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mother and daughter in field

Article

Webinar explores issues for Southeast Asian refugee communities in U.S.

An April 1 webinar, “Critical Refugee Studies: Militarism, Migration, and Memory-work,” will bring together three leading scholars of refugee studies to explore those questions as they relate to a range of humanitarian efforts, refugee and migration policies, as well as artistic/cultural practices and performances that have formed in the wake of U.S. wars in Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia
Jake Turner

Article

Cornell Postdoc Jake Turner receives prestigious NASA Hubble Fellowship

“These outstanding young scientists are the future of astrophysics, and their impact on our understanding of the cosmos will be felt for decades to come."
AI Revolution

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Panel to examine the intersection of artificial intelligence with ethics, politics and policy

The April 15 Arts Unplugged virtual event will be moderated by Andrew Ross Sorkin ’99, of CNBC and The New York Times.
People walking on a city sidewalk

Article

Why we are more cautious when there's a light at the end of the tunnel

People tend to be more cautious when there’s a light a the end of the tunnel, writes Thomas D. Gilovich, professor of psychology, in a Los Angeles Times op-ed.
Sky full of stars, time lapse, over palm trees

Article

DJs, Linnaeus, and Plantation History

Professor Tao Leigh Goffe works at the intersection of environmental humanities, science, and technology. As a researcher, writer, and DJ, she is especially interested in histories of imperialism, migration, and globalization.
Kevin Bloomfield in front of a book stack.
Kevin Bloomfield, History Ph.D. Candidate.

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Researching the cultural impacts of climate change on Italy

Kevin Bloomfield, a Ph.D. candidate in history, publishes the paper - Beyond One-Way Determinism: San Frediano's Miracle and Climate Change in Central and Southern Italy in Late Antiquity, which examines the cultural impacts of climate change in Italy during the first millennium by studying scientific data and historical records.
girl at dig
Harper Tooch

Article

Summer experience grant removes barriers of access for students

Students can receive financial support for their remote and in-person summer work opportunities.
Person working at a computer
Vida Maralani/Provided Doug McKee, senior lecturer in economics, teaches his Applied Econometrics class via Zoom.

Article

In pandemic, students with tech-savvy teachers fared better

“It is the courses that have intentional, structured peer interaction that have the least loss in learning."
Yellow "polling place" sign and voters
Owen Yancher, Creative Commons license 4.0 Voters line up outside a Voter Assistance Center in Davis, California to cast their votes early in the 2020 General Election.

Article

Voter suppression started way before Jim Crow. It’s a longstanding American tradition.

David A. Bateman, associate professor of government, writes in the Washington Post that a new law passed by the Georgia legislature that would restrict access to voting is part of a nationwide push among Republicans to curtail ballot access, the latest wave of efforts to restrict voting, dating back to the 2000s.
Construction equipment on a work site

Article

Expert discusses Biden’s sweeping infrastructure package

The Biden administration is making a pitch this week for new legislation that could provide a combined $3 trillion for infrastructure such as roads, rail lines, electric vehicle charging stations and grid upgrades, while investing in universal pre-kindergarten, paid family leave and free community college. Noliwe Rooks, the W.E.B. Du Bois Professor in Africana studies and an expert on the role of segregation in American society, comments.
comic showing ghost, McGraw Tower and COVID mask

Article

Alumnus shares public health messages through comic illustrations

What began as a class project exploring a fraught period of Ithaca history has transformed into a COVID-related comic that Leo Levy ’20, hopes can reach people with a lesson from the past and an accessible message about public health.
Tree in bloom outside building with marble columns

Article

Dean announces transitions on Arts & Sciences leadership team

Ray Jayawardhana, the Harold Tanner Dean of Arts and Sciences, has announced transitions in the College’s senior leadership team that will take place on July 1.
Campus buildings seen from above, in evening light

Article

New residence halls named for three Arts & Sciences alumni

Hu Shi 1914, Toni Morrison, M.A. ’55, and Ruth Bader Ginsburg ’54 are honored in the North Campus expansion.
Evanston, Illinois
Image by Madcoverboy; Creative Commons license 3.0 Evanston, Illinois

Article

'Not a local affair': Evanston reparations could harm national movement

On Monday night the city of Evanston, Illinois approved the nation’s first government-run reparations program that would make funds available to Black families for homeownership and mortgage assistance. Olúfémi Táíwò, professor of Africana studies, and Noliwe Rooks, the W.E.B. Du Bois Professor in Africana studies and director of the American Studies Program, comment.
Student and dad on Libe Slope
Amy Crouch, right, and her dad Andy, relax on Libe Slope

Article

How to make peace with your phone (and other screens)

Amy Crouch ’22 thinks fellow students should take a look at the ways tech influences their lives.
Neil Ashcroft

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Neil Ashcroft, world-renowned theoretical physicist, dies at 82

Neil W. Ashcroft, the Horace White Professor of Physics Emeritus in the College of Arts and Sciences and a leading theorist in condensed matter physics, died March 15 in Ithaca. In the late 1960s and first half of the 1970s, he collaborated with David Mermin, professor emeritus of physics, to write “Solid State Physics,” which became the gold standard of textbooks for their discipline.
Tianyao Qu

Article

Student Spotlight: Tianyao Qu

Tianyao Qu is a doctoral student in sociology from China.
Walter LaFeber sitting in front of a bookcase, smiling
Cornell University Walter F. LaFeber, the Andrew H. and James S. Tisch Distinguished University Professor Emeritus in the Department of History.

Article

New professorship honors Walter LaFeber

Tom Pepinsky will be the inaugural Walter F. LaFeber Professor.
student near water

Article

Student’s Hawaii experience reinforces environmental classwork

Carl Beach '22 wasn't giving up on a semester abroad -- he decided to take a semester off to work on an organic lettuce farm and learn more of what he's been studying in his environmental education classes.
Book cover: Constants of the Motion

Article

Poetry book by Nobel-winning chemist features science, nature

Roald Hoffmann received a Nobel Prize in 1981 for chemistry—and he’s been writing poetry since the 1970s. His fifth book of poetry, “Constants in Motion,” was recently published by Dos Madres Press. These poems interweave Hoffmann’s scientific perspective with his poetic sensibility.
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