Olive leaves

Antisemitism and Islamophobia Examined

With a concerning increase in antisemitic and Islamophobic acts around the country, and unfortunately, on the Cornell campus as well, the College of Arts & Sciences has partnered with the Office of the Provost and departments and programs across the university to bring four leading academics to campus in the Spring 2024 semester to explore the history of these forms of prejudice, examine the impact on Jews and Muslims in America today, and map the legal landscape for addressing these issues. These cross-disciplinary talks will also reflect on the relationship between the history of Israel/Palestine, as well as the outbreak of the current conflict, and contemporary manifestations of antisemitism and Islamophobia.

All events will also be live streamed and recorded via eCornell. 

Sponsored by: Office of the Provost; College of Arts & Sciences; Department of Near Eastern Studies; Jewish Studies Program; Religious Studies Program; Center for Racial Justice and Equitable Futures; Clarke Initiative for Law and Development in the Middle East at the Cornell Law School; Comparative Muslim Societies; Critical Ottoman + Post-Ottoman Studies; Einhorn Center for Community Engagement; Mario Einaudi Center for International Studies; Society for the Humanities

We strive to host inclusive, accessible events that enable all individuals, including individuals with disabilities, to engage fully. To request an accommodation or for inquiries about accessibility, please email Lori Sonken at ljs269@cornell.edu.

 

Menachem Rosensaft photo

“Antisemitism, the Israel-Hamas War, and Distorting the Law of Genocide: A Perfect Storm”

Feb. 12, 5 p.m.
401 Warren Hall

Click here to watch the recorded event

Menachem Rosensaft
Adjunct Professor of Law at Cornell University and
General Counsel Emeritus, World Jewish Congress

Born in 1948 in the Displaced Persons camp of Bergen-Belsen in Germany, the son of two survivors of the Nazi death and concentration camps of Auschwitz and Bergen-Belsen, Menachem Z. Rosensaft is also general counsel emeritus of the World Jewish Congress, and a past president of Park Avenue Synagogue in New York City. He has taught about the law of genocide at Cornell Law School since 2008 and at Columbia Law School since 2011; beginning this semester, he is teaching separate courses on antisemitism in the courts and in jurisprudence to Cornell law students and to undergraduates. He is the author of "Poems Born in Bergen-Belsen" (Kelsay Books, 2021) and editor of "God, Faith & Identity from the Ashes: Reflections of Children and Grandchildren of Holocaust Survivors" (Jewish Lights Publishing, 2015).

References and Resources

Moustafa Bayoumi

“Out of Time: On the Rise and Resilience of Anti-Muslim Bigotry Today”

March 18, 5 p.m.
401 Warren Hall

Moustafa Bayoumi
Journalist and Professor of English, Brooklyn College, City University of New York

Moustafa Bayoumi is the author of “How Does It Feel To Be a Problem?: Being Young and Arab in America” and “This Muslim American Life: Dispatches from the War on Terror.” He is a columnist for The Guardian as well as a regular contributor to The Nation, and his writing has also appeared in The New York Times, New York Magazine, The Daily Beast, CNN, The London Review of Books, The National, The Chronicle of Higher Education and The Progressive.

References and Resources

Sahar Aziz

“Racializing Religion: Islamophobia, Antisemitism and Palestine”

March 28, 5 p.m.
Room G10, Biotech Building

Sahar Aziz
Distinguished Professor of Law, Middle East Legal Studies Scholar and Chancellor’s Social Justice Scholar, Rutgers University Law School

Sahar Aziz is also the founding director of the Center for Security, Race and Rights. Her book “The Racial Muslim: When Racism Quashes Religious Freedom” examines how national security laws and policies impact the civil rights of racial, religious, and ethnic minorities in the U.S.

References and Resources

Derek Penslar

“Beyond Sympathy and Antisemitism: The International Community and the Creation of the State of Israel, 1947-1949”

April 8, 5 p.m.
Room G10, Biotech Building

Derek Penslar
William Lee Frost Professor of Jewish History, Department of History, Harvard University

Derek Penslar’s research has engaged with a variety of approaches and methods, including the history of science and technology, economic history, military history, biography, post-colonial theory and the history of emotions. His most recent book is “Zionism: An Emotional State,” and he is currently writing a book about worldwide reactions to the 1948 Palestine War.

References and Resources