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Book cover: Ancient Greek Lists

Article

Athena Kirk explores ancient Greek lists in new book

Athena Kirk's new book, “Ancient Greek Lists: Catalogue and Inventory Across Genres,” argues that the list form was the ancient mode of expressing value through text, examining the ways in which lists can “stand in for objects, create value, act as methods of control, and approximate the infinite.”
Susan Choi
Heather Weston Susan Choi

Article

Susan Choi MFA ’95, National Book Award winner, to read on April 22

Novelist Susan Choi MFA ’95, whose novel "Trust Fall" won the 2019 National Book Award, will read from her New Yorker story "Flashlight" during a virtual event on April 22.
Medical worker putting a bandage on a vaccinated person

Article

A blow to health and the pocketbook

A new Univision News poll in partnership with UnidosUS found that Hispanics in areas with non-traditional Latino communities report more problems due to Covid-19, Garcia-Rios reports, while President Joe Biden's approval among Hispanics overall is nearly 80%, and almost 9 in every 10 approve of the latest economic stimulus package.
Hubble Space Telescope

Article

Space Tech Industry Day a convergence of research, business

A constellation of scientists, technologists and businesses will offer a glimpse into how space will be explored in the years to come during the inaugural Space Tech Industry Day, a virtual symposium hosted by Cornell on April 23.
Large lab dominated by a blue ring device
Provided The muon g-2 ring sits in its detector hall amidst electronics racks, the muon beamline and other equipment at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. This experiment studies the precession (or wobble) of muons as they travel through the magnetic field.

Article

Elusive particle may point to undiscovered physics

The muon, a tiny particle, has the giant potential to upend our understanding of the subatomic world.
Book cover: Subdivision

Article

Lennon publishes doubleheader of new fantastical fiction

J. Robert Lennon, who teaches fiction in Cornell’s Creative Writing Program, published two new books on April 6: “Subdivision,” a fantastical novel about memory and trauma; and “Let me Think,” 71 short stories collected from years of observing and chronicling the American absurd in fiction.
Silhouette of person kneeling by a pond

Article

Religion follows patterns of politicization during COVID-19

The analysis confirmed a documented benefit of religion: increased mental health.
Asian actress on stage

Article

‘Asiamnesia’ tackles racial stereotypes in entertainment industry

“Asiamnesia,” being presented online April 15-17 by the Department of Performing and Media Arts, explores the stereotypes that plague Asian/Asian American actresses throughout their careers, but also celebrates their versatility and endurance.
Laura Jones-Wilson, Ph.D. ’12

Article

From Cornell to NASA to an icy moon of Jupiter

Laura Jones-Wilson, M.S. ’10, Ph.D. ’12, has long had her sights set on outer space. Cornell faculty, including astronomy professor Terry Herter, helped send her to a dream job with NASA.
small helicopter flying over a barren, orange landscape
JPL/ NASA An illustration depicting Mars Helicopter Ingenuity during a test flight on Mars

Article

Roving Mars, by air and land

The Ingenuity helicopter and other rotorcraft could provide reconnaissance for rovers to help guide their routes.
William J. Kennedy

Article

Kennedy recognized by Renaissance Society of America

The Renaissance Society of America has given William J. Kennedy its Paul Oskar Kristeller Lifetime Achievement Award, honoring “a lifetime of uncompromising devotion to the highest standard of scholarship accompanied by exceptional achievement in Renaissance studies.”
James Walsh

Article

Klarman fellow bridges divide between math and philosophy

Working in the field of logic, James Walsh, a Klarman Postdoctoral Fellow in philosophy, studies the axiomatic method, a central methodology in mathematics whereby claims are proven from axioms.
Gregor Siegmund

Article

Grad student wins fellowship to connect research to policy

Gregor-Fausto Siegmund, a doctoral student in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, was recently awarded the Ecological Society of America’s Katherine S. McCarter Graduate Student Policy Award.
Person holding a baby close

Article

Faculty examine racism ‘embedded’ in US health care

During the “Racism in America: Health” webinar on March 29, four Cornell faculty members elaborated on ways the COVID-19 pandemic has exposed race-based discrepancies in health care and health outcomes under the American health care system.
Nanjala Nyabola

Article

Nyabola to speak at Race and Racism Across Borders event

Writer, activist and political analyst Nanjala Nyabola will discuss her upcoming book, Travelling while Black: Essays Inspired by a Life on the Move, as part of Global Cornell’s Race and Racism Across Borders webinar on April 12.
Book cover: Feral Ornamentals

Article

‘Playful uncertainty’ apparent in new poetry by Charlie Green

In “Feral Ornamentals,” Literatures in English senior lecturer Charlie Green finds whimsy in uncertainty and humor in the “terrifying,” creating new poems with a fact-based look at the natural world and a sense of exploration through process.
Salah Hassan

Article

Hassan honored for elevating the study of global modern art

Salah Hassan, Distinguished Professor of Arts and Sciences in Africana Studies, has been elected as the 2021 Distinguished Scholar by the College Art Association for his scholarship and curatorial work, which have been deeply formative in bringing recognition to the study of modern and contemporary African and African diaspora art.
Kapil Longani

Article

Kapil Longani ’97: shaping NYC’s COVID-19 response

Since 2018, Kapil Longani ’97 has served as chief counsel to New York City’s Mayor Bill de Blasio. Since the start of the pandemic, Longani has helped shape the city’s plans for reopening schools, creating outdoor dining protocols, and thinking through legal issues around COVID testing and vaccine distribution.
Taylor Shuler
Taylor Shuler

Article

College names new director of human resources

The College of Arts & Sciences will welcome a new director of human resources, Taylor Shuler, beginning on April 1. Shuler, senior HR business partner in the Ann S. Bowers College of Computing and Information Science and Cornell Engineering HR Service Center, will take over for Sara Bloxsom, who’s worked in the dean’s office for more than 36 years, 27 of those directing the college’s human resources efforts and who is retiring this year.
Samantha Trumbo

Article

Astronomy to host 51 Pegasi b Fellow Samantha Trumbo ’13

As a 51 Pegasi b Fellow hosted by the astronomy department, Samantha Trumbo ’13, a doctoral student in planetary science at the California Institute of Technology, will follow up on her breakthrough research on Europa and other of Jupiter's moons.
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