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Person helps a small child knead bread dough

Article

Mothers live longer as child mortality declines

The dramatic decline in childhood mortality during the 20th century has added a full year to women’s lives, according to a new study.
Tree in bloom at sunrise

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National Humanities Center selects two A&S professors as 2024-25 Fellows

… in residence at the NHC in Durham, North Carolina. “NHC fellowships are highly selective. It is a real honor to have … scholars from Cornell Arts and Sciences recognized with fellowships in the same year,” said Deborah Starr , professor …
pink blossoms on branches in the foreground; McGraw Tower in the background with a clear blue sky

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Outstanding A&S teachers, advisors honored with 2024 awards

Among the faculty members being recognized this year for exceptional teaching and mentorship are Liliana Colanzi, Durba Ghosh, and Nick Admussen.
College clock tower rises up beyond a small hill under a lovely blue summery sky

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Projects funded by 2024 New Frontier Grants look toward the future

The College of Arts and Sciences (A&S) has awarded five New Frontier Grants to cutting edge projects in science, social science and the humanities led by A&S faculty.
 Durba Ghosh talks with students

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Ghosh to lead Cornell’s Society for the Humanities

Recently the faculty director of the Humanities Scholars Program, Ghosh brings to the Society scholarly background in the history of British colonialism on the Indian subcontinent; academic focuses on gender and sexuality and South Asia; and broad experience with interdisciplinary collaborations.
metal puck levitates above a slightly pitted white surface

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Ultrasound experiment identifies new superconductor

With pulses of sound through tiny speakers, Cornell physics researchers have clarified the basic nature of the newly discovered superconductor uranium ditelluride.
Book cover: Households in Context

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Exploring the remains of ancient daily life

The collection “Households in Context: Dwelling in Ptolemaic and Roman Egypt” shifts the archaeological perspective from public and elite spaces such as temples, tombs and palaces to everyday dwellings and interactions of families.
Three people sit in armchairs, part of a panel discussion event

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Paying a price to speak out, dissident writers help preserve freedoms

Speakers at “Dissident Writers: A Conversation” explored how writers keep freedoms open for others by taking risks to criticize governments or societies in environments where there is a cost.
Wenbo Tang

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Klarman Fellow: AI has a lot to learn from 'flexible and reliable' human memory

Greater understanding of beneficial characteristics of the human brain, such as flexibility and reliability, will help Wenbo Tang develop therapies for human diseases – and improve AI systems.
Person standing on a path in front of columned ruins of the Parthenon

Article

‘Adventurous’ classical scholar Pietro Pucci dies at 96

Pietro (Piero) Pucci, an influential classical scholar who spent more than 50 years in the Department of Classics in the College of Arts and Sciences, died in Paris on April 7. He was 96.
One person puts off another with a hand gesture

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Persistent questioning of knowledge takes a toll

A new study highlights how demoralizing it can be for a person to work in a climate of repetitive skepticism and doubt.
Five people perform a dance, creating a V formation with their bodies

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'A place at the table': Exploring free expression through dance

Student-artists will reimagine the Kiplinger Theater in a work titled “This table has been a house in the rain,” through choreography and improvisation, innovative staging and ties to other art forms.
three people working in a film set that looks like a mid-century living room. The fly space of a theater is visible above the room's walls

Article

Film set in Schwartz Center: A pop-up laboratory for building worlds

Throughout spring 2024, a set installed on the Kiplinger Theatre stage for the short film “Remembering Colin Stall" doubled as an experimental zone for film and theater technology classes.
Theda Skocpol

Article

A.D. White professor addresses threats to democracy

Theda Skocpol, Harvard scholar and A.D. White Professor-at-Large at Cornell, will present the public lecture “Rising Threats to U.S. Democracy – Roots and Responses” on April 9.
Shiqi Lin

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Klarman Fellow: Digital media connects people in a polarized world

Situated at the intersection of media and politics, Shiqi Lin's research explores how critical media culture can push open new spaces for social participation and how new forms of media can bring people together, particularly at times of crisis and radical change.
Tapan Mitra

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Economics department receives $500K gift honoring Tapan Mitra

The Dr. Tapan Mitra Economics Fund continues the passion of the late professor for top-level collaboration in economic theory and his legacy of generosity.
Margarita Suñer

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‘Innovative’ linguist Margarita Suñer dies at 82

Margarita Amalia Suñer, professor of linguistics emerita in the College of Arts and Sciences (A&S), died in Ojai, California on Feb. 29 after a long bout with Alzheimer’s disease. She was 82.
Anna Shechtman

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‘Queen of crosswords’ recovers the puzzle’s feminist side

In “The Riddles of the Sphinx: Inheriting a Feminist History of the Crossword Puzzle,” Klarman Fellow Anna Shechtman combines a history of the crossword highlighting its early women innovators with her memoir of a personal challenge.
Painting of mountains

Article

Grant to enhance art history book

A Millard Meiss Publication Fund award will support the publication of Kelly Presutti's "Land into Landscape: Art, Environment, and the Making of Modern France.”
Daniel Baugh

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Daniel Baugh, ‘giant’ of British maritime history, dies at 92

Daniel A. Baugh, professor emeritus of history, died Feb. 9 at his home in Williamsburg, Virginia. He was 92.
Book cover: Subjunctive Aesthetics

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On climate change, artists ‘imagine the world otherwise’

Carolyn Fornoff explores how contemporary Mexican writers, filmmakers and visual artists have reacted to climate change in her book "Subjunctive Aesthetics: Mexican Cultural Production in the Era of Climate Change."
Lenka Zdeborová

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Spring 2024 Bethe Lecture bridges physics and computer science

During three events March 13-15, Lenka Zdeborová will explore how principles from statistical physics provide insights into challenging computational problems.
Book cover: The Mechanical Tradition of Hero of Alexandria

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Book brings elusive Greek technical writer into focus

Hero of Alexandria's writings on things like pneumatics, pure geometry and catapults have influenced many others through the ages and his principles touch early modern inventions including the player piano and the fire engine.
Jake Turner

Article

Earth to be exhibit A for lunar exoplanet research

With the help of a Cornell astronomy researcher, the first radio telescope ever to land on the moon will lay the foundation for detecting habitable planets in our solar system by observing Earth as if it’s an exoplanet.
Ishion Hutchinson

Article

Book-length poem narrates struggle of young Black fighters in WWI

… of the First World War. It was short-listed for the 2023 T. S. Eliot Prize . The College of Arts and Sciences …
Book cover: Sharing Less Commonly Taught Languages

Article

Book shines light on teaching ‘Less Commonly Taught Languages’

How can institutions, programs, and LCTL instructors collaborate and think across institutional boundaries to strengthen language offerings?
Graphic representing a material with yellow and purple balls connected by lines

Article

Physicists detect elusive ‘Bragg glass’ phase with machine learning tool

The discovery settles a long-standing question of whether this almost–but not quite–ordered state of Bragg glass can exist in real materials.
Jacob Anbinder

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How did our housing get so expensive? Klarman Fellow dives into the history

Jacob Anbinder is finding political as well as economic reasons for the current housing crisis.
Overhead view of Cornell's campus buildings under a light sky, with a lake in the distance

Article

Twelve new Klarman Fellows to pursue innovative, timely research in A&S

… The Klarmans renewed and expanded their support in 2023 . “Klarman Fellows exemplify the spirit of curiosity and …
Illustration of a DNA double helix in blue and purple dots

Article

‘Shredding’ cancer cells: Study of CRISPR-Cas3 brings us a step closer

Cornell researchers have taken an important step toward harnessing CRISPR gene editing in “targeted, safe and potent” cancer treatment.
A dense forest; trees covered with gree leaves

Article

Pinkham wins British Journalism Award for feature on migrants

Pinkham’s winning story follows migrants from Syria “wandering in a cold, wet purgatory” on the Polish border of the European Union.
Satellite of the middle east region, seen from space: brown land, dark blue sea, highlights of snow, unusual for the region

Article

Maps have political power, sociologist says

A new paper examines the politics at play in the maps published in 2020 as part of a peace plan proposed by the Trump Administration.
college campus buildings under a partly cloudy sky, with a lake beyond

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Cornell historian testifies in landmark Indigenous rights case

Jon Parmenter helped the defense successfully assert an Aboriginal right to trade based on 18th century treaties.
Book cover: The Counterhuman imaginary

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Animals, disasters, love: Book traces nonhuman voices in literature

Laura Brown's research looks beyond “the singular, autonomous, rational, human protagonist" to find that many other-than-human presences appear in literature – with a lot to say to readers.
Book cover: Racial Blackness and Indian Ocean Slavery

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Tracing Indian Ocean slavery through Iranian cinema

In a new book, Professor Parisa Vaziri explores how Iranian cinema preserves the legacy of Indian Ocean slavery.
A gold building foregrounded by rows of stalls and many parked motorcycles

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In India, computer typists embody ‘fuzzy’ nature of state borders

State borders are taken for granted as fixed, hard lines, but Natasha Raheja argues that crossing spaces are, in reality, expansive and indistinct.
person adjusting an experimental set up

Article

Klarman Fellow: Studying electron interactions with ultrafast lasers and more

New experimental tools developed by Hongyuan Li give insight into an exponentially complicated world.
Candle

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Martin Shefter, professor of government, dies at 79

Martin Shefter ’64, professor of government emeritus in the College of Arts and Sciences, died Nov. 3 in Ithaca. He was 79.
Three people sitting in chairs on a stage

Article

What’s worth protecting about a free press? NPR’s Folkenflik asks panelists

“News is so important because it’s the foundation for critical thinking and critical debate,” said Texas Tribune editor-in-chief Sewell Chan.
Person writing on a dry-erase board with a window in the background

Article

Klarman Fellow’s mission: Break cycles of poverty through fact-based policy

Neil Cholli studies labor and public economics with a goal of helping to shape social policy in the U.S.
White haired, mostly bald, with a mustache and a tweed jacket and a smile

Article

Louis Hand, pioneer of high-energy physics, dies at 90

Colleagues remember Hand as a scientist devoted to discovery, both in his field of expertise and beyond.
tiny beads in yellow, green and blue

Article

Cornell chemists image basic blocks of synthetic polymers

Cornell chemists have developed a technique that allows them to image polymerization catalysis reactions at single-monomer resolution, key in discovering the molecular composition of a synthetic polymer.
Images, most of them black and white, hung on a white museum wall

Article

Exhibit, symposium consider art ‘Between Performance and Documentation’

Live events Nov. 16-17 will illuminate questions about performance, photograph and video – and the complex relationship between the three – posed in a current Johnson Museum exhibition.
Book cover: Scholars in COVID Times

Article

Book reexamines scholarship, teaching in the era of COVID-19

Three years after the disruptions of 2020, teaching and research continue to be immensely different from pre-pandemic times, according to scholar Debra Castillo.
Historical black and white image of a young man reading

Article

James John, medieval historian, dies at 95

… Medieval Studies honored John for his work in 2009. He won fellowships and awards from the National Endowment for the …
Grey city buildings look very small compared to billowing steel- and linen-colored clouds filling the sky above

Article

Metal organic frameworks turn greenhouse gas into ‘gold’

Researchers have found an innovative way to handle fluorinated gases as stable solids -- and the same process could someday be used to capture greenhouse gases.
Painting showing a regal woman in magnificent black dress; a servant holds a red parasol over her

Article

Clothing is key: Van Dyck portrait captures ‘moment in the history of race-making’

Ana Howie used her expertise in cultures of dressing and European imperialism to uncover a story tying Genoa’s elite families to globalized material trade – and Atlantic and Mediterranean slavery.
Three people sitting on a city bench with one standing behind; they are laughing together

Article

Performance and conference honor Viramontes

Held Oct. 20-21, “Lest Silence Be Destructive" will feature readings, discussions and the first public performance of a musical album based on Viramontes' work.
Book cover: The Routledge Anthology of Women's Theatre Theory and Dramatic Criticism

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Scholars spearhead anthology of women’s theater writing

The first wide-ranging anthology of theater theory and dramatic criticism by women and woman-identified writers contains entries by more than 80 scholars, including Cornell faculty and alumni.
A figure featuring four black and white grids with colorful shapes on each

Article

Physicists realize fractionalization without a magnetic field 

The Kim Group leveraged geometric thinking in a twisted bilayer graphene lattice to predict new effects, a novel approach.