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zebra finches

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Goldberg shares research at Russekoff lecture

The Mitzi Sutton Russekoff ’54 Lecture took place Nov. 15 at the Cornell Club in New York City.
Red flag (of China) with medical syringe and bottle on top of it

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Why protesters are targeting Xi Jinping for China’s ‘zero covid’ failures

Simmering anger at Beijing’s “zero covid” restrictions exploded over the past few days, writes Jeremy Lee Wallace, associate professor of government, in Washington Post commentary.
abstract pattern featuring green dots in neat rows, intersected by orange lines

Article

Physicist identifies how electron crystals melt

Eun-Ah Kim and Michael Matty, M.S. ’19, Ph.D. ’22, describe a phase in between the liquid and the solid for electron structures.
A black and white image of Tom Davis in suit and tie, wearing black plastic glasses and smiling.

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Economist Tom Davis dies at 93

Tom E. Davis, professor emeritus of economics, was an expert on economic development in Latin America.
A plate of Peruvian fried rice

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Goffe: Collaboration is key to major humanities grants

Grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Mellon Foundation will help make humanities research more accessible to scholars and the public.
someone holding vegetables

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Town-gown awards honor food-related community partnerships

The awards celebrate cooperation between the university and the greater Ithaca community.
student wearing VR headset

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Students visit virtual world to learn research technique

Students experienced cryo-electron microscopy as part of a collaboration with Cornell’s Center for Teaching Innovation.
A star shining brightly onto the red surface of a planet.

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Webb telescope shows exoplanet atmosphere as never seen before

“This is the first time we see concrete evidence of photochemistry – chemical reactions initialized by energetic stellar light – on exoplanets.”
three women with tote bags

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Laidlaw scholars at Cornell gain global perspectives

Four current Laidlaw scholars share their summer research or leadership in action experiences.
Person speaking passionately into a microphone

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Anthology celebrates Nuyorican Poets Cafe founder

A digital and print collection, co-edited by Karen Jaime, pays tribute to the late Miguel Algarín.
man speaking

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Cornell, global partners discuss the next ‘grand challenge’

Global Cornell will host a town hall in December for additional feedback and announce the new Global Grand Challenge theme in the coming year.
woman

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Moderna scientist to speak about COVID vaccine development

Melissa Moore led early-stage research teams developing Moderna’s platform technologies in mRNA design and delivery.
Bryn Rosenfeld

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Professor wins award for book about middle class and democracy

Bryn Rosenfeld, assistant professor of government, won for her book, “The Autocratic Middle Class: How State Dependency Reduces the Demand for Democracy.”
Large aircraft without a cockpit parked on a runway at sunset

Article

Public views drone strikes with other countries’ support as most legitimate

A first-of-its kind survey reveals that Americans consider tactical strikes, used with the consent of other nations, to be the most morally legitimate or appropriate.
Anil Menon

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Klarman fellow: How do past events affect political present?

Anil Menon is researching the political legacies of forced migration, which is on the rise globally due to climate change and conflict.
Baobao Zhang

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Zhang, Klarman fellow, named Schmidt Futures AI2050 Fellow

Zhang will work with the Center for New Democratic Processes to test whether public assemblies can be an effective method for increasing public participation in AI governance.
woman outside

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Senior wins award from SETI Institute for planetary research

Ze-Wen Koh plans to pursue a doctorate in planetary science after graduation.
Two people wearing suits speak, seated on a stage among plants

Article

Iceland president: ‘Turn smallness into strength’

During a highlight of a two-day visit to Cornell, Guðni Th. Jóhannesson discussed his country’s commitment to peace, diversity and science-based climate solutions during a sold-out lecture held Nov. 10.
Two red shacks on log platforms in a bay

Article

Designed for rural living

Small communities struggle with infrastructure ill-suited to rural life. Phoebe Sengers is improving design processes for better outcomes.
Red white and blue flag merges with a red and yellow flag

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Biden, Xi meeting a chance to ‘step back from the brink’ of conflict

Government professor Jessica Chen Weiss: "I hope that both leaders will come prepared to test the proposition that the two governments could begin a range of discussions in areas of shared concern and explore potential terms of coexistence.”
Six people stand in a group at the front of a classroom, conversing

Article

Breaking barriers: Peer outreach boosts student veterans

The number of undergraduate veterans enrolled at Cornell has nearly quadrupled over the past five years, thanks in part to outreach by a team of student veteran peer counselors.
Rocket blasting off from SpaceX, blazing fire and huge clouds of smoke behind.

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The promise and perils of the new space boom

The rapid expansion of commercial space activity, as well as its integration into key government programs and services, represents a leap into uncharted waters.
A few dozen men sit and stand in a group, talking intensely

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‘Young, male and aimless’: Why are men in India delaying marriage?

Economic changes in India are forcing adaptations in traditional marriage practices, but not enough for a modernizing overhaul to this deeply traditional institution.
Book cover: Black Women's Rights

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Book: Time for Black women to claim the right to lead

Extending her research on writing by Black women around the world, Carole Boyce Davies examines the stories of Black women political leaders in Africa and in the global African Diaspora.
boys outside a school

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Faculty members' film focuses on boarding school escape

The film by Jeffrey Palmer and Austin Bunn has been entered into five film festivals; they’ll hear word of acceptance soon.
Cornell's central campus with lake beyond

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Over 50 Students Receive NSF Graduate Fellowships

The National Science Foundation offers approximately 2,000 fellowships per year to research-based master’s and doctoral students pursuing STEM studies.
Jennifer Wissink

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Winter Session spotlight: Jennifer Wissink

Students can earn up to four credits in the three-week winter session – including Wissink's ECON 1110 Introductory Microeconomics course.
Picture of Judith Byfield

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Professor’s book wins American Historical Association prize

Judith Byfield's book "The Great Upheaval: Women and Nation in Postwar Nigeria" was awarded the Martin A. Klein Prize.
An airplane-shaped drone with narrow wings and a propellor on one end

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Latest U.S. drone transfer to Ukraine signals shift in ‘character of war’

Lieutenant Colonel Paul Lushenko, senior policy fellow at Cornell's Tech Policy Lab, comments on the announcement of the inclusion of the MQ-9 Reaper in a U.S. defense aid package to Ukraine
Data science illustration

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Students can now choose new minor in data science

The minor is distinctive in including courses from many disciplines, from across Cornell’s schools and colleges.
Peter Enns

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Cornell-led election survey seeks to improve science of polls

The survey boasts a sample size 20 times larger than most nationally representative surveys.
Webb’s First Deep Field is galaxy cluster SMACS 0723

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A dream of discovering alien life finds new hope

For Lisa Kaltenegger and her generation of exoplanet astronomers, decades of planning have set the stage for an epochal detection.
Voting stickers on a roll

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Fear of election violence highlights how political landscape has changed

Concerns about violence are growing as Election Day in the U.S. nears, says scholar Mabel Berezin: “The expectation of violence at the polls this year signals how much has changed in the American electoral landscape since 2018."
Headshots of three people

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Experts will offer day-after election analysis

The in-person event The Day After: What Happened on Election Night and What Happens Next will be held November 9 from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. in Martha Van Rensselaer Hall Room 155.
woman outside Space Sciences building

Article

Nexus Scholar applications open for summer 2023

The program matches undergraduate students with summer opportunities to work side by side with faculty from across the College.
Person wearing a suit

Article

‘Fearmongering’ drives Netanyahu’s comeback in Israel

Government scholar Uriel Abulof comments that in Israel, Netanyahu’s comeback appears powered by politician Itamar Ben-Gvir and the far-right.  
Brick building with stone columns; people walking on a lawn

Article

History offers the best argument for continuing affirmative action

Affirmative action still has a vital role to play for addressing the history of discrimination: perspective by Glenn Altschuler
woman with test tubes and pipette

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Undergrad publishes research on genetic information exchange

A study by Margaret Keymakh '23 and others in her lab was just published in PLOS Genetics.
Three young people stand in a wood-paneled room

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Students get out the vote, on campus and across the state

“The youth have so much power, and we just don’t use it,” said Lauren Sherman ’24, Arts and Sciences student.
Horizontally-oriented abstract shapes in purple, green and black

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Common dietary fiber promotes allergy-like immune responses

Inulin, a type of dietary fiber commonly used in health supplements and known to have certain anti-inflammatory properties, can also promote an allergy-related type of inflammation in the lung and gut, and other parts of the body, according to a preclinical study from Cornell researchers.
Red flag against a white sky

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People over numbers: Book charts China’s neopolitical turn

Jeremy Lee Wallace explains how a few numbers came to define Chinese politics “until they did not count what mattered and what they counted did not measure up,” and the “stunning about-face” led by Xi Jinping within the Chinese Communist Party.
Eleven people pose on a staircase

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Cornell students to work at UN’s COP27 conference in Egypt

Eleven Cornell students, including two from Arts & Sciences, will help delegations from specialized agencies and small countries gain a stronger voice at the United Nations’ COP27 conference.
Person wearing a bright yellow jacket places a ticket on a car windshield

Article

Parking ticket reminders work, but not for all

New research by Cornell behavioral economists reveals that people who would benefit the most from gentle “nudges” to pay their fines – those who are least responsive to tickets in the first place – respond least to those reminders.
man in office

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Polarization research in Ecuador underscores risks to U.S. democracy

When political parties stoke partisan conflicts – often by contesting formal state institutions, like systems for managing elections – actual democratic capacity may take a hit as public opinion polarizes.
model

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New research reveals how genes turn on and off

Yeast has revealed for Cornell researchers a key mechanism in how genes are controlled.
abstract pattern

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$1.25M grant to advance control of 2D materials

The research will help give unprecedented insight into electron behavior and quantum phenomena.
White-haired Aviam wearing a leather cowboy hat, wearing sunglasses and a white t-shirt.

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Noted archaeologist to speak on new discoveries in Israel in Cornell lecture

Israeli archaeologist Mordechai Aviam and his colleagues made headlines by finding possible evidence, near the Sea of Galilee, of the house of St. Peter.
six women on steps of Goldwin Smith Hall

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Student group, Women of Color Athletics, creates space

A new group provides female athletes of color at Cornell with a community of women who understand their challenges.
woman

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Scholar offers talk about Brazilian crackdowns and feminist response

Her talk is one of three in the African Diaspora Knowledge Exchange Series.
Stamps showing Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Toni Morrison

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Morrison, Ginsburg to be honored with U.S. postage stamps

Both Morrison and Ginsburg graduated from the College of Arts & Sciences.
Red wires on a black background

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Cornell joins Schmidt AI in Science postdoc research initiative

Cornell, including A&S, will recruit and train a cohort of up to 100 postdoctoral fellows in the fields of natural sciences and engineering. 
Two multi-story gray buildings with people walking in front

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As Kerry presses World Bank on climate, field staff drive global lending reform

Prof. Richard Clark comments on U.S. special climate envoy John Kerry's call for the World Bank and other multilateral institutions to expand financing for low-carbon projects in developing countries.
A city of countless skyscrapers with a wide river off to the left and an orange sunrise in the sky.

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Xi’s personalized, opaque rule eroding trust in Chinese economy

Prof. Jeremy Wallace comments on China's report that its third-quarter gross domestic product grew.
a circle of small gold stars surrounding the green silhouette of the African continent superimposed on a starburst image

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Role of African Union scrutinized in Ethiopia, Tigray peace talks

Prof. Oumar Ba comments on the first formal peace talks between the Ethiopian government and Tigray forces since war broke out two years ago.
Scott Emr

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Emr receives lifetime achievement award

Professor Scott Emr's work focuses on a pathway that's a key aspect of membrane biology.
Asian American Studies Program

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Asian American Studies celebrates 35th anniversary

The Asian American Studies Program will hold a symposium with second director Gary Okihiro and other events this year.
Historical black and white photo of a person seated, in formal clothes and a serious expression

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‘Words as battle axes’: A&S professors appear in Frederick Douglass film

Derrick Spires, Edward Baptist, and Gerard Aching help tell the story of the man born into slavery who became an advocate for African American freedom. 
Madi Fulchiero '23

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Senior explores concept of space, representation in films

Madi Fulchiero is studying Spanish and English and focused her senior thesis on two Disney films.
Person speaking into a microphone

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eLab announces record cohort of student startups

Student founders from any field across Cornell may apply; once accepted, participants engage in entrepreneurship bootcamps, conduct customer discovery, refine their business plans and gain access to a network of successful Cornell alumni, all while earning college credit.
Two seated figures sillhouetted against a red sky

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AI is changing scientists’ understanding of language learning

And it is also raising questions about innate grammar.
Goldwin Smith Hall in the fall

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Weiss teaching award honors eight exceptional faculty

Four A&S faculty members have been honored for their excellence in undergraduate teaching and mentoring.
Arched hallway with sunlight

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Klarman fellow’s research prompts Stanford to investigate its practices

An archive discovery by Cornell historian Charles Petersen reported in an August 2021 newsletter prompted Stanford University to establish a task force to investigate its admissions practices for Jewish students in the 1950s.
Person gesturing at a projection on a wall

Article

Latin America—Party Systems and Inequality

When citizens take the law into their own hands, what’s behind this behavior? Observing such a mob scene drove Vincent Mauro to study the question.
City blocks lit up at night, seen from far above

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Drones ‘arms race’ renews debate on global governance

The United States is calling for a United Nations Security Council briefing regarding news that Russia is using Iranian drones for its war on Ukraine. Paul Lushenko, doctoral student and co-editor of "Drones and Global Order: Implications of Remote Warfare for International Society,” comments.
Book cover: Space-Time Colonialism

Article

Juliana Hu Pegues wins ASA book prize for ‘Space-Time Colonialism’

The prize recognizes the best first book in American Studies released during 2021.
Drab buildings under a cloudy sky: Big Ben reconizable in the distance

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Policy inconsistent with UK reality: Cornell experts available on Truss resignation

Britain’s Prime Minister Liz Truss has announced she will resign after 44 days in office. Cornell University professors discuss what’s next for the United Kingdom and the European Union.
Book cover: Blood Novels

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‘Blood Novels’ explores material, metaphor in Spanish realist fiction

Julia Chang examines the presence of blood and its deeper literary and cultural meaning in novels by three Spanish authors.
Yellow streak against a pale blue and pink sky; a missile launch

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America and China Don’t Need to Knock Each Other Out to Win

Competition and conflict between the United States and China have continued to intensify, writes Jessica Chen Weiss, in New York Times commentary.
person on ladder looking through telescope

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Crowd gathers to wish ‘happy birthday’ to Fuertes telescope

Partygoers enjoyed space-themed cupcakes, peered through the telescope and pored over a display of observatory instruments to celebrate Fuertes Observatory's 100th birthday.
Photograph of Wynne Williams-Ceci '24

Article

Junior explores possibilities of influencers in public health messaging

Wynne Williams-Ceci's research focuses on improving public health messaging for vaping.
Person standing in a field, surrounded by green, yellow and red plants

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From fabric arts to human waste: Student Biennial projects transcend

More than a dozen students are taking part in the Cornell Biennial, which aims to serve as an anchor for the arts at Cornell.
book cover: Contemporary State Building

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How security crises can spur state-building in Latin America

Gustavo Flores-Macías analyzes key factors of public safety across Latin America in his new book.
Pattern of six-sided shapes in oranges, yellows and black

Article

Electrons in a Strange Metal World

Why do electrons in high-temperature superconductors behave the way they do? A quantum explanation could have planetary payoffs.
Fourteen people stand on the steps of a house, ready to party

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Student veteran finds a sense of community at Cornell

Matthew Garcia '25 was in the first cohort of student-veterans to move in to the university’s new Veteran Program House on University Avenue.
A few dozen people sit around a large square of tables in a room decorated with maps

Article

Global Cornell awards support new international courses

Five International Cornell Curriculum grants totaling $114,000 will support faculty developing courses that feature international experiences for students.
Person speaks in front of a class sitting using dynamic hand gestures

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Grant supports language learning research

“Understanding the impact of Languages Across the Curriculum on all participants will allow us to build on its success and offer multilingual students more opportunities to engage with their disciplinary content in languages other than English."
Frank Schroeder in glasses, beard and black shirt in front of lab equipment and next to woman with long black hair, white shirt and glasses.

Article

Chemist offers new insights into how serotonin regulates behavior

The findings could ultimately lead to more effective treatments for a wide range of mental health disorders.
Looking down on a campus with buildings, green lawn, and a lake in the distance

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Staff changes will support interdisciplinary research

Julia Thom-Levy, professor of physics in the College of Arts and Sciences, has been named associate vice provost for physical sciences.
Vincent Mauro

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Tips for Grad Students from a Global PhD Research Scholar

Government PhD candidate Vincent Mauro shares his strategies for making the most of your time at an international collection of primary materials.
Person wearing red and pearls, speaking at a podium

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Pollack lauds ‘amazing Cornellians’ in State of the University speech

Cornell's president highlighted recent achievements of Arts and Sciences faculty.
Two squares: on the left, large squares of black, purple and green. On the right, much higher resolution

Article

Lipid expansion microscopy uses the ‘power of click chemistry’

Cornell researchers have discovered a way to apply expansion microscopy, which expands cell components to make them more visible, to lipids using click chemistry, recognized with the 2022 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.
Book cover: Pandemic Politics

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Book: Partisanship led to disastrous response to COVID-19

Survey data shows how the Trump administration’s partisan response led ordinary citizens to prioritize what was good for their “team” rather than what was good for their country.
Three people sitting on a couch, laughing

Article

New podcast explores imaging technique cryo-EM

Co-host Liz Kellogg, assistant professor of molecular biology and genetics: "In every interview, we heard stories that we hadn’t expected and learned something new about each other and about the field."
poster for show

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Indigenous dance troupe show focuses on residential schools

The internationally-renowned Indigenous Canadian Kaha:wi Dance Theatre will perform their poignant "The Mush Hole" at Cornell on Friday, Oct. 28.
Sandeep Parmar

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Sandeep Parmar, Zalaznick Distinguished Visiting Writer, to read Oct. 20

This year’s Richard Cleaveland Memorial Reading will include a conversation with poet Valzhyna Mort, associate professor of literatures in English.
Two people performing with dramatic hand gestures and facial expressions

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American Sign Language (ASL) Literature Series features ASL Poets/Storytellers

Six American Sign Language (ASL) poets and storytellers will visit Cornell between Oct. 12 and Nov. 28, in conjunction with this semester’s ASL Literature course.
artist drawing of Jupiter's moon Europa

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Juno’s new views heighten Europa Clipper excitement

Scientists believe Europa’s global ocean contains more than twice as much water as all of Earth’s oceans combined and may be suitable for life.
abstract art

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Conference explores the theme of “Repair” from multiple humanities disciplines

Friday’s concluding keynote will be delivered by Jonathan Flatley, a scholar of literature and the relationship between politics and aesthetics .
Seamus Davis

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Prestigious Buckley Prize awarded to physicist J.C. Séamus Davis

Quantum microscopes based on Davis designs have galvanized quantum materials visualization studies globally.
A painting (generated by AI) depicts a person looking stressed while a bubble over his head reflects the colors of a scene outside his window

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Conference considers the Art & Science of Thinking Oct. 21-22

“We want to open a robust dialogue between humanists and scientists around the very notion of ‘thought’ and ‘thinking,."
Tweezers placing a black square onto a green rectangle

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U.S. tech restrictions on China could backfire without ally support

The U.S. is increasingly seeing China as a significant military threat and seeking to maintain as large a lead as possible in its tech competition with China, says Sarah Kreps.
Person speaking in front of a microphone

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Belarusian poet: Nobel Peace Prize win must galvanize support

Viasna, founded by activist Ales Bialiatski, was ‘liquidated’ by Lukashenka’s regime in 2003 but he has continued to fight for human rights in Belarus under the great pressure, says poet Valzhyna Mort.
woman

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Alumni return to celebrate theatre troupe’s 30th anniversary

A series of special events, including visits from alumni involved in theatre, film and television, is being planned to celebrate the 30th anniversary of Teatrotaller, a theatre troupe formed to promote Spanish, Latin American and Latino culture.
Two people talking in a wooded setting

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‘Our story’: Native American writers cultivate their craft

Fourteen authors from upstate New York participating in the Oñgwaga•ä’ Writers Workshop this month.
two people at pianos

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Doctor/musician alumnus takes stage in Van Cliburn competition

"At every point in your life, different music will speak to you in new ways."
police mug shots of four women

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“The Janes” director: ‘I think we’re going way backwards.’

Tia Lessin '89 will be on campus Oct. 13 for a screening at Cornell Cinema.
Among several people in a tent, a woman in red traditional clothing faces three officials in white shirts and black trousers, sitting on a couch

Article

Creating ‘political economy of hope’ at Pakistan-India border

When politicians get close to constituents, either physically or digitally, they manage expectations and offer assurances to constituents. But they also expose themselves to scrutiny, giving people the chance to see beyond the performance into imperfect government workings.
Magnified image shows an arrow-shaped embryo, glowing red, yellow and purple at the edges, appearing to give off red smoke

Article

Cornell chemists contributed to Nobel Prize-winning work

Jeremy M. Baskin and Pamela Chang were doctoral students in Carolyn Bertozzi’s lab at the University of California, Berkley, in the mid-2000s.
Two people wearing gloves work with football-sized museum object

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Mummified bird gets second life in multisensory exhibition

“A Tale of Two Mummies: Multisensory Experience” runs Oct. 7-9, from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., in Upson Hall’s Lounge 116.
Two-part illustration: on the left, a three-color wheel; on the right, an elongated tangle of blue, grey and purple threads

Article

Protein family shows how life adapted to oxygen

“By understanding the evolution of these proteins, we can understand how nature adapts to environmental changes at the molecular level. In turn, we also learn about our planet’s past.”