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Derek Chang

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Radio show features Derek Chang on anti-Asian/Pacific Islander bias

The May 4 episode of All Things Equal featured Derek Chang, Cornell Associate Professor of History and Asian American Studies. Chang discussed the context and history of the rise in anti-Asian/Pacific Islander bias during the past year.
people in business clothes check smart phones

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‘Who is guarding Facebook’s guardians?’ Lawmakers can step up oversight

Facebook’s Oversight Board voted to uphold the social media company’s suspension of former President Donald Trump on its platforms but insisted the company must review the suspension to determine an appropriate length of time and develop clearer policies to balance freedom of expression and public safety. Professor of government Sarah Kreps says that Facebook’s Oversight Board acts like a private firm without real accountability of its own and that its consequential decision making over Facebook’s policies require additional independent oversight.
Three children walk away down a path between tents

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Despite refugee boost and family reunification, Biden has ‘long road to go’

On Monday, the Biden administration announced a significant increase in the number of refugees allowed to enter the United States. The announcement comes as the administration also begins to reunite parents separated from their children under the Trump administration’s family separation policy. Maria Cristina Garcia, professor of history and Latino studies, and Chiara Galli, sociologist and Klarman Postdoctoral Fellow, comment.
Book cover: Iberian Moorings

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‘Iberian Moorings’ compares Muslim and Jewish golden ages

In his new book “Iberian Moorings,” professor Ross Brann compares the histories of the Jewish and Muslim traditions in the Iberian Peninsula between the tenth and thirteenth centuries, tracing how Islamic al-Andalus and Jewish Sefarad were invested with special political, cultural and historical significance across the Middle Ages.
one woman on screen

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Science journalists on the pandemic: ‘We couldn’t trust our regular sources’

From flame wars on twitter to sleepless nights, four of the country’s leading science journalists spoke of the challenges they’ve faced covering the COVID-19 pandemic during an April 28 event hosted by the College of Arts & Sciences.
Artwork showing a woman in a blue dress looking into a mirror.
Mirror, Mirror II by Alison Saar

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Online exhibit marks women’s suffrage centennial

Though the pandemic made it difficult to celebrate, 2020 marked a significant milestone – 100 years of women’s suffrage in the United States. The anniversary prompted co-instructors Shirley Samuels, professor of Literatures in English, and recently retired Johnson Museum Gale and Ira Drukier Curator Nancy Green, to create a History of Art course, “The Museum and the Object Practicum on American Women and Work.”
Red ink magazine cover from 1931

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In honor of May Day, ‘Di Linke’ conference videos available online

The archives of the Jewish Peoples Fraternal Order (JPFO), which flourished for two decades before the Cold War, are now housed at Cornell’s Kheel Center, Catherwood Library. Videos from a December 2020 conference focused on the archives are now available online.
Band on stage, bright lights, worshippers

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Religion both helped and hurt during the pandemic

In a Scientific American op-ed, sociologist Landon Schnabel reports that during the COVID-19 pandemic religion was good, on balance, for people’s mental health—but not so good for physical health.
View between two library shelves full of books

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Grants advance social sciences research, collaboration

The Cornell Center for Social Sciences has awarded spring grants supporting research and conferences involving more than 30 faculty and researchers across campus, including collaborations within new and expanded superdepartments.
bottles labeled 'coronavirus vaccine'

Article

Skipping the second shot could prolong pandemic, study finds

Many Americans remain confused about when COVID-19 vaccines provide strong protection and the need for continued public health precautions, according to new Cornell research.
 A.D. White House, home of the Society for the Humanities

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Humanities students share wide variety of research in spring event

More than 30 students who have conducted research will present their work in a virtual conference May 6-7. One panel investigates the ideas of Goldwin Smith, while other presentations focus on migrant workers in Singapore, political violence in Africa and other topics.
City buildings

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Panel: Pandemic and protests laid economic injustices bare

Four faculty members and a Washington Post reporter discussed the ways racism shapes economic policies, and how economic policies shape inequality in America – historically and today.
Dark space, interrupted by two black holes
Aurore Simonnet/LIGO-Caltech-MIT-Sonoma State An artist’s conception shows two merging black holes similar to those detected by LIGO.

Article

Black hole spin finding could shed light on relativity, stars

Klarman Fellow Vijay Varma applied a new method of studying binary black holes to analyze data gathered by the LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave detectors.
Satellite view of a canal
Ursa Space/provided Dozens of oil tankers and commercial cargo ships line up at Great Bitter Lake to enter the Suez Canal in this early April satellite image

Article

Cosmos unveils space-tech business, science opportunities

More than a dozen space industry leaders, capital investors, startup entrepreneurs, a Jet Propulsions Lab manager and Cornell professors gathered virtually for Cornell’s first Space Tech Industry Day/K.K. Wang Day symposium on April 23 – featuring this year’s event theme, “New Opportunities in Space Technology.”
Amartya Sen

Article

Nobel laureate Sen to lecture on protecting democracy

Amartya Sen, professor of economics and philosophy at Harvard University and recipient of the 1998 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences, will give the annual Bartels World Affairs Lecture on May 5. His talk, “Attacks on Democracy,” is Hosted by the Mario Einaudi Center for International Studies; this year’s virtual lecture is part of the center’s democratic resilience global research priority.
Person holding protest sign on steps

Article

Americans aren’t learning about anti-Asian bias. We have the data.

Peter K. Enns, professor of government, and Katherine Zaslavsky, graduate student in sociology, write in the Washington Post that since the coronoavirus pandemic began, Asian, Asian American and Pacific Islander communities have endured a spike in hate crimes, with elderly people attacked on the street and an Atlanta gunman killing eight people, six of them women of Asian descent. Are Americans aware of the trend? they ask.
Book cover: Rational Rules

Article

‘Rational Rules’ book examines how we learn morals

In his new book, “Rational Rules: Towards a Theory of Moral Learning,” philosophy professor Shaun Nichols argues that we can explain many of the features of moral systems and how humans form them in terms of rational learning from evidence.
Yiddish textbooks

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Yiddish to fulfill A&S language requirement

This fall, Cornell's new Yiddish program is setting its sights higher, riding a generational trend in interest and changing attitudes towards the language.
Tree in bloom outside building with marble columns

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A&S students win prestigious Truman, Goldwater scholarships

Three students in the College of Arts & Sciences have been honored with Harry Truman and Barry Goldwater scholarships.
Carolyn Forché

Article

'Poet of witness' Carolyn Forché to read on April 29

The Spring 2021 Zalaznick Reading Series culminates with a reading by poet, memoirist, translator, and human rights advocate Carolyn Forché on Thursday, April 29.
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