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Natalie Wolchover wearing a blck shirt and earrings

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Natalie Wolchover named A&S Zubrow Visiting Journalist for Spring 2022

“Natalie’s writing is followed closely by other journalists as well as the broader public, so she wields considerable influence when it comes to science coverage,” said Dean Ray Jayawardhana, who founded the DVJ program.
Dean Colleen Barry with microphone in hand, speaking at podiumSchool of Public Policy

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Decades in making, public policy school now a reality

The Cornell Jeb E. Brooks School of Public Policy advances the university’s mission, Pres. Pollack said, by creating a home for policy-oriented faculty to study and teach, and for students to learn, about effective, thoughtful policymaking, analysis and management.
Houses of Kabul

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Cornell informs, takes action on Afghanistan

A&S faculty moderated two panels on Afghanistan hosted by Global Cornell.
Ngoc Truong sitting on a rock in front of a lake and a mountain with glacier

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Student Spotlight: Ngoc Truong

Ngoc Truong chose to study at Cornell because of its tradition of faculty/staff/student involvement with spacecraft missions and its many notable planetary scientists and astrophysicists such as Carl Sagan and Edwin Salpeter.
Colored three-dimensional scan of the hands and footprints

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Hand and footprint art dates to mid-Ice Age

To answer whether this could be the oldest art ever found, the team turned to A&S research scientist Thomas Urban.
St. James AME Zion Church

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Excavation to explore church’s role in Underground Railroad

A multidisciplinary team of Cornell students and faculty and local schoolchildren will begin an archeological dig Sept. 18 at St. James, to deepen the understanding of the church’s role in safeguarding enslaved freedom-seekers in the 19th century and shed new light on the church’s long history.
A woman standing with her fist upraised at a protest at the White House

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Should hatemongers and extremists have free speech rights? Cornell lecture

Hate speech is increasingly discouraged, even banned, by many institutions and media platforms. But allowing open forums for all speech -- including hate speech -- is essential to democracy.
Beams of light memorializing the Twin Towers with the Manhattan skyline below.

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What 9/11 taught us about the president, Congress and who makes war and peace

In this op-ed, Prof. Douglas Kriner reflects on the lessons learned about war powers in the U.S. since 9/11.
Samantha Wesner

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Student spotlight: Samantha Wesner

Samantha Wesner is a doctoral candidate in history from Dallas, Texas. After attending Harvard University as an undergraduate, she chose to pursue further study at Cornell due to the field of history’s reputation as well as the library’s resources.
student looking at book

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Students explore 9/11 from multiple perspectives in new class

This fall, 20 juniors are exploring that time period in a new class, “Introduction to the Humanities: Afterlives of 9-11.”
Steve Johnson

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Best-selling science writer to talk about epidemics, life expectancy, innovation

New York Times best-selling science and technology writer Steven Johnson will visit campus Sept. 22 to meet with students and faculty and offer a talk to the Cornell community, “20,000 More Days: How We Doubled Global Life Expectancy in Just 100 years.”
 Arts quad in the fall

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New Fellowships support diverse scholars in the humanities

Two recent College of Arts and Sciences’ doctoral graduates, Sadia Shirazi PhD ‘21 and Dexter Lee Thomas PhD ’20, have been named Emerging Voices Fellows by the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS). Cornell will also be hosting an ACLS post-doctoral fellow in the Department of History.
microsope

Article

Freeze! Researchers develop new protein crystallography tool

Combining state-of-the-art X-ray technology and cryogenics, Cornell physics researchers have developed a new method for analyzing proteins in action, a breakthrough that will enable the study of far more proteins than is possible with current methods.
two people talking

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Tech/Law Colloquium features privacy, COVID and incarceration

The Technology and Law Colloquium – a hybrid Cornell University course and public lecture series – will return this semester with talks from 13 leading scholars who study the legal and ethical questions surrounding technology’s impact in areas like privacy, sex and gender, data collection, and policing.
rally

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FGSS/LGBT programs plan yearlong anniversary celebration

Faculty, staff, students and alumni are planning a series of events to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Cornell’s women’s studies program, now Feminist, Gender and Sexuality Studies (FGSS), as well as Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) activism and advocacy on campus.
Nikole Hannah-Jones

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Creator of 1619 Project to give Kops Lecture

Nikole Hannah-Jones, the Pulitzer Prize-winning creator of the 1619 Project and a staff writer at The New York Times Magazine, will give the Daniel W. Kops Freedom of the Press Lecture on Sept. 9 at 5 p.m.
Lyrianne González

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Student spotlight: Lyrianne González

Lyrianne González is a doctoral student in history from Los Angeles, California. After attending California State University, Northridge as an undergraduate, she chose to pursue further study at Cornell for the opportunity to work alongside her mentors and the flexibility of the field of history.
students on sidewalk

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Caribbean studies finds home at Einaudi Center

In addition to changing its name, the program – celebrating its 60th year – has renewed and expanded its commitment to the study of the Caribbean cultures, places and people.
 Workers walking with a solar panel

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Scientists harness machine learning to lower solar energy cost

A Cornell-led collaboration received a $3 million grant from the U.S. Department of Energy to use machine learning to accelerate the creation of low-cost materials for solar energy.
Two mice perched on flowers and facing each other

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Lonely mice more vocal, more social after isolation

Female mice exhibit a strong drive to socialize with other females following periods of acute isolation.
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