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Ekaterina Landgren, long blonde hair and glasses with a blue shirt, smiling

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Student Spotlight: Ekaterina Landgren

Ekaterina Landgren is a doctoral candidate in applied mathematics from Moscow, Russia.
Family gathering for a group hug

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Religious have fewer children in secular countries

The study reveals that “societal secularism” is a better predictor of fertility rates than surveys of individuals’ religiosity or secularism.
Cover art for "The Queer Nuyorican"

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Book explores historical queerness of the Nuyorican Poets Cafe

“What’s really interesting about the space and these artists is that there is a queerness that has always been at the cafe, but that has never been used to frame the space.”
Reflections of Mars' South Pole
ESA/Mars Express Mars’ south pole – which looks like creamy swirls in cappuccino – is an icy cap with carbon dioxide and other geologic traits. About a mile below the cap is smectite, a hydrated version of clay.

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Mars’ bright south pole reflections may be clay – not water

“Those bright reflections have been big news over the last few years because they were initially interpreted as liquid water below the ice.”
Beams of light

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Chaotic electrons heed ‘limit’ in strange metals

"We are finally unlocking the enigma behind the intense motions of electrons in strange metals.”
Fuertes Observatory against a starry sky

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Lai and Mish win initial graduate, professional teaching prize

Dong Lai, M.S. ’91, Ph.D. ’94, professor of astronomy, has won Cornell’s inaugural Provost Award for Teaching Excellence in Graduate and Professional Degree Programs.
Mukoma Wa Ngugi

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From Kenya to Cornell, writer Mukoma ranges across genres

Mukoma Wa Ngugi channeled his fascination with Ethiopian "Tizita" songs into his fourth novel, “Unbury Our Dead With Song,” which will be published Sept. 21
Person receiving vaccine

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Vaccine acceptance higher in developing nations than U.S.

The study provides one of the first insights into vaccine acceptance and hesitancy in a broad selection of low- and middle-income countries, covering more than 20,000 survey respondents.
Wedding bouquet and rings

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Choose wisely: Spouses consolidate resources in families

In consolidating multiple types of resources, married partners deal themselves and their children better hands with long-term payoffs, but the process may amplify inequality across generations.
Image of hundreds of microscopic proteins shaped like cylinders

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Advanced microscopy shines light on new CRISPR-Cas system

The interdisciplinary team used a state-of-the-art microscopy technique to reveal protein structures and key steps of a CRISPR-Cas system that holds promise for developing an improved gene editing tool.
Samantha Sheppard
Samantha Sheppard

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PMA professor named Academy Film Scholar

Samantha N. Sheppard, associate professor of performing and media arts, has been named a 2021 Academy Film Scholar by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences
people protesting

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3 tropes of white victimhood

History professor Lawrence Glickman writes in The Atlantic that in the conservative world, the idea that white people in the United States are under siege has become doctrine.
People placing their hands together in a circle

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Following the ‘wisdom of crowds’ can stifle diversity

People who believe there is a single right answer to a question are better at coordinating with others, but that benefit may come at the expense of a diversity of opinions.
Wind turbines in a green, hilly landscape

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Wilson wins grant to explore rare earth element opportunities

Justin Wilson has received a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy to develop more efficient methods of separating rare earth elements, which are found in wind turbines, liquid crystal displays, batteries, and portable electronics.
Graphic featuring yellow, red and blue balls
Provided Ligands can attract and help each other adsorb at some surface sites, but can often impair each other’s efforts as well.

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Small molecule plays outsize role in controlling nanoparticle

A breakthrough imaging technique enabled Cornell researchers to gain new insights into how tiny ligands adsorb on the surface of nanoparticles and how they can tune a particle’s shape.
woman smiling

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Alumna encourages citizen involvement in space science

Amy Kaminski '98 is the editor of a new book about space science and public engagement and has a career that’s dedicated to helping people become involved in science research in a meaningful way.
Glowing gold mountian
NASA/JPL Maat Mons, a large volcano on Venus, is shown in this 1991 simulated-color radar image from NASA’s Magellan spacecraft mission.

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Trace gas phosphine points to volcanic activity on Venus

Cornell astronomers say the detection of phosphine in the atmosphere of Venus shows evidence of explosive volcanoes on the mysterious planet.
Book cover: Hijacking the Agenda

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Money talks: Wealthy ‘hijack’ agenda to gain policy influence

Analyzing more than 20 years of floor speeches by members of Congress, a new book co-authored by Peter K. Enns, professor in the Department of Government, explains why corporate and wealthy interests dominate the national economic agenda.
Ancient stone building in a rocky landscape, seen from above
Provided The 7th-century Armenian church of Vankasar in Azerbaijan. In April, Caucasus Heritage Watch reported a possible threat to the church due to satellite detection of heavy machinery in the area.

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Satellite monitoring documents cultural heritage at risk

Cornell researchers are using satellite imagery to protect endangered and damaged cultural heritage in the South Caucasus, where an ethnic conflict between Armenia and Azerbaijan has raged for decades.
Gabe Godines

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Navy veteran/student tackles problem of recidivism

Gabe Godines ’23 hopes to use the Warrior Scholar Project model to help formerly incarcerated individuals pursue college degrees.
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