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J. Robert Lennon

Article

Lennon chases down literary thrills in new series

J. Robert Lennon’s “weird hike through the wilderness” of publishing has led him to a new and unexpected place: writing his first thriller, “Hard Girls,” published Feb. 20 by Mulholland Books.
Tower as seen from Mcgraw

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Four early-career faculty win 2024 Sloan Research awards

Assistant professors Anna Y.Q. Ho, Chao-Ming Jian, Rene Kizilcec and Karan Mehta are among 126 early-career researchers who have won 2024 Sloan Research Fellowships from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.
colorful burst of light: purple, yellow, orange

Article

Cornell astronomers on newly approved UVEX NASA mission

The space telescope, targeted to launch in 2030, has Cornell astronomers Anna Y. Q. Ho and Shrinivas R. Kulkarni on the mission team.
Jake Turner

Article

Earth to be exhibit A for lunar exoplanet research

With the help of a Cornell astronomy researcher, the first radio telescope ever to land on the moon will lay the foundation for detecting habitable planets in our solar system by observing Earth as if it’s an exoplanet.
Ishion Hutchinson

Article

Book-length poem narrates struggle of young Black fighters in WWI

In the new book-length work, “School of Instructions: A Poem,” Ishion Hutchinson writes of the psychic and physical terrors of West Indian soldiers volunteering in British regiments in the Middle East during World War I.
Two people leaning back to back against a wall, shadowed

Article

For couples, negative speaks louder than positive

People with stronger negative implicit judgments about a partner are more likely to perceive negativity in daily interactions with them, which hurts relationship satisfaction over time, Cornell psychology research finds.
Kimberlé Crenshaw ’81

Article

Scholar to speak on intersectional justice at annual MLK lecture

This year’s Martin Luther King, Jr. Commemorative Lecture on Feb. 19 will focus on the importance of understanding and addressing systems of oppression and their impact on multiple identities, including race and gender.
Sun rising over a flooded field

Article

Climate roundtable sparks insight and invites collaboration

Song Lin, Tisch University Professor of chemistry and chemical biology, talked about how his lab is trying to mimic the way plants fix CO2, via the abundant enzyme Rubisco.
Person stands with microphone, speaking intently while three others listen

Article

Students debate free speech in the workplace

Students from ILR and the College of Arts and Sciences debated “Speechless: Should Union Organizers Have Free Speech Rights in the Workplace?” on Jan. 31 in Ives Hall, supporting the Freedom of Expression Theme Year.
metal puck levitates above a slightly pitted white surface

Article

'Flawed' material resolves superconductor conundrum

Researchers developed a more controlled way of making nickelates, a material that could potentially help pinpoint the key qualities that enable high-temperature superconductivity.
Illustration of leaves

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Speaker series to examine antisemitism, Islamophobia

Leading academics from around the country will join Cornell experts in a semester-long series, “Antisemitism and Islamophobia Examined."
Outline of a brain in colorful lines against a black background

Article

Mouse social calls and distress calls linked to different neurons

“Vocal communication is central to our experience as humans and fundamental to social success for animals generally,” said Prof. Katherine Tschida.
Illustration consisting of several orange slashes forming an upward V shape

Article

Researchers develop new model to predict surface atom scattering

Helium beams are potentially very useful for understanding the surface characteristics of materials on the molecular level.
Piece of scientific equipment the size of a room, shaped in a circle

Article

Cornell takes role in advancing software at CERN

Cornell and other U.S. universities have been awarded $25 million from the National Science Foundation for research at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN in Switzerland.
Eight people stand shoulder to shoulder

Article

Student grant board funds social justice community projects

Thirteen student-community projects received grants through the Community Partnership Funding Board’s latest round of funding. Their shared goal: to bring social justice to the community.
Armita holding cramp-bites

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Cornell student creates alternative remedy to relieve period pain

Armita Jamshidi ‘25, a computer science major and Harrison College Scholar, founded Aunt Flo’s Kitchen and is a new member of eLab.
Sign showing Populism going one way and democracy the other

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Democratic decline a global phenomenon, even in wealthy nations

Democratic backsliding is occurring in an unprecedented number of wealthy countries once thought immune to such forces – the United States among them, finds a new analysis led by Cornell political scientists.
Michell Chresfield

Article

Breaking silence: Speak up to honor MLK Jr., historian says

A Cornell historian says one of the most important aspects of Martin Luther King Jr.’s legacy was his insistence on speaking up against social and economic injustice.
Kate Manne

Article

‘Fatphobia’ a form of oppression, says philosopher Kate Manne

In her new book, “Unshrinking: How to Face Fatphobia,” Prof. Kate Manne draws on personal experience as well as scientific research.
Two dark brown fish, seen from above

Article

In chatty midshipman fish, the midbrain awakens a gift of gab

The midbrain in these fish may serve as a useful model for how mammals and other vertebrates, including humans, control vocal expressions.
Black and white historic image of Filipino family traveling on carabao from an American concentration camp, circa 1900

Article

Digitized images illuminate U.S. colonial period in the Philippines

Idyllic images of the Philippines taken by a Cornell alumnus in 1902 illuminate the tumultuous U.S. annexation of the archipelago in the aftermath of the Philippine-American War, according to a Ph.D. student in history.
college campus buildings under a partly cloudy sky, with a lake beyond

Article

Cornell’s ’24-25 Schwarzman Scholars named

A&S young alumni are among this year’s group of 150 scholars, who are from 43 countries and 114 universities. Schwarzman Scholars, an international program, nurtures a network of future global leaders.
Book cover: Racial Blackness and Indian Ocean Slavery

Article

Tracing Indian Ocean slavery through Iranian cinema

In a new book, Professor Parisa Vaziri explores how Iranian cinema preserves the legacy of Indian Ocean slavery.
A gold building foregrounded by rows of stalls and many parked motorcycles

Article

In India, computer typists embody ‘fuzzy’ nature of state borders

State borders are taken for granted as fixed, hard lines, but Natasha Raheja argues that crossing spaces are, in reality, expansive and indistinct.
A few musician rock out on a stage lit by yellow and purple spotlights

Article

The Dead rise: Cornell '77 tribute show among top stories of 2023

When Dead & Company came to Cornell in May for a benefit concert commemorating the Grateful Dead’s famed “Cornell ’77” show, it drew thousands to Barton Hall. The March announcement of the show was the most-viewed Chronicle story of 2023.
Jamila Michener

Article

Poverty is a political choice, Michener tells NYS Senate

On Dec. 12, Jamila Michener offered expert testimony during a New York State Senate committee hearing focused on the causes and effects of poverty in the state’s small and midsized cities.
Seven people cluster around a table holding wooden boxes of butterfly specimens

Article

Class explores Nabokov as writer and ‘butterfly man’

Writer Vladimir Nabokov spent much of his time on campus in nature and in the Cornell Insect Collection.
Four people on a stage, with instruments

Article

Long-lost Moog synthesizer finally makes it to the stage

The rebuilt and rewired instrument, designed by theorist David Rothenberg and built by renowned synthesizer pioneer Robert Moog Ph.D. ’65, is now a part of Cornell’s instrument collection.
Statue facing a campus building; fall foliage

Article

Cornell Center for Social Sciences announces 2023 fall grantees

Faculty member Douglas Kriner and graduate student Aaron Childree received grants in CCSS's fall round, among 16 awards across eight Cornell schools and colleges.
five smoke stacks against a blue sky; the second from left belches smoke

Article

Researchers win grants to remove carbon from air, manufacturing

Cornell Atkinson faculty fellow Phillip Milner has won a Carbontech Development Initiative grants to develop carbon removal technologies.
Oval shaped sea creature with an orange inside emits blue light

Article

Sea fireflies synchronize their sparkle to seek soulmates

In sea fireflies’ underwater ballet, the males sway together in perfect, illuminated synchronization, basking in the blue-like glow of their secreted iridescent mucus.
Jessica Chen Weiss

Article

China expert, present at Xi visit to US, aims to cool tensions

Professor Jessica Chen Weiss, an expert on U.S.-China relations, was among the attendees of the dinner following President Joe Biden and Chinese President Xi Jinping’s historic summit on Nov. 15 in San Francisco.
group of women

Article

New group unites, empowers female students of color

Women Leaders of Color at Cornell aims to increase representation of women of color in leadership positions across professions.
Circular cluster of fibrous strands; the strands in the center are purple

Article

Oral delivery a possibility for silica-based C’Dots

New research has shown that ultrasmall Cornell Prime Dots, or C’Dots, which are among the nanocarriers for therapeutics once thought to be viable only by injection, have the potential to be administered orally.
Person gestures from behind a podium with a microphone

Article

Talk explores connections of antisemitism, Islamophobia, racism

Professor Ross Brann discussed how racist depictions of the behavior and appearance of Jews and Muslims encouraged ancient peoples to view them as others in a talk held Nov. 16.
Candle

Article

Martin Shefter, professor of government, dies at 79

Martin Shefter ’64, professor of government emeritus in the College of Arts and Sciences, died Nov. 3 in Ithaca. He was 79.
Book cover: Critical Hits

Article

From pages to pixels: Writers offer literary take on video games

In “Critical Hits,” a new essay anthology co-edited by J. Robert Lennon, writers explore their own experiences with video games, and how those simulated worlds connect to real life.
Three people sitting in chairs on a stage

Article

What’s worth protecting about a free press? NPR’s Folkenflik asks panelists

“News is so important because it’s the foundation for critical thinking and critical debate,” said Texas Tribune editor-in-chief Sewell Chan.
Person pointing to a brightly lit, colorful computer schreen

Article

With unprecedented flares, stellar corpse shows signs of life

The bright, brief flashes – as short as a few minutes in duration, and as powerful as the original explosion 100 days later – appeared in the aftermath of a rare type of stellar cataclysm.
Frances Cayton

Article

Einaudi fellowships support students learning uncommon languages

Now in her third year as a doctoral student in government, Frances Cayton believes that growing her skills in Ukrainian is key to her dissertation in comparative politics
Six people

Article

Banerjee named Mellon Fellow in diversity network

Banerjee will participate in a two-year academic leadership and governance fellowship.
White haired, mostly bald, with a mustache and a tweed jacket and a smile

Article

Louis Hand, pioneer of high-energy physics, dies at 90

Colleagues remember Hand as a scientist devoted to discovery, both in his field of expertise and beyond.
A few dozen people stand on a stage below a banner: 2023 President's Awards for Employee Excellence

Article

Employee Excellence awards honor staff achievements

Seventeen individuals and three teams of Cornell employees received President's Awards for Employee Excellence in seven categories, highlighting the achievements of staff and faculty who excel in their roles.
tiny beads in yellow, green and blue

Article

Cornell chemists image basic blocks of synthetic polymers

Cornell chemists have developed a technique that allows them to image polymerization catalysis reactions at single-monomer resolution, key in discovering the molecular composition of a synthetic polymer.
A person holds up a green vest -- a military flack jacket from the U.S. Navy

Article

Cornell’s military veterans share their histories

A current student veteran has been exploring the stories of Cornell's military veterans through a collection of interviews and memorabilia.
Cornell campus seen from above in autumn, with Cayuga Lake in the distance

Article

Einhorn Center announces new Engaged Faculty Fellows

A&S faculty are among twenty-five faculty and academic staff from nine Cornell colleges and units are Engaged Faculty Fellows for the 2023-24 academic year.
Illustration of a tree, a dinosaur and a bird

Article

Jurassic worlds might be easier to spot than modern Earth

Telescopes could better detect potential chemical signatures of life in the atmosphere of an Earth-like exoplanet more closely resembling the age the dinosaurs inhabited than the one we know today, Cornell astronomers find.
Cornell campus seen from above in autumn, with Cayuga Lake in the distance

Article

Weiss teaching awards honor exceptional faculty

Three A&S faculty members are recipients of 2023 Stephen H. Weiss Teaching Awards, which honor a sustained commitment to teaching and mentoring undergraduate students.
Historical black and white image of a young man reading

Article

James John, medieval historian, dies at 95

A specialist in the study of Latin manuscripts and the history of universities, John was a part of the Cornell community for more than 50 years, teaching medieval intellectual history, historiography and paleography – the study of historical writing systems and manuscripts.
Book cover: The Activist Humanist

Article

Humanists have the power and the tools to fight climate change

Humanities scholars have an important role to play in the current political struggle to stave off environmental collapse, Caroline Levine argues in her new book.