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A gold swirving line leads toward a bright vanishing point through a dark purple tunnel

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Powerful X-ray laser ushers in a new era of science

Cornell researchers contributed critical knowledge in the early days of the LCLS-II project.
Carl Wieman

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Nobel Prize winner to talk about science education research

Physicist Carl Wieman will visit campus Sept. 25-29 as an A.D. White Professor-at-Large, working with students and faculty and offering a public talk about his work in science education.
People silhouetted against a sunset over water

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Fulbright-Hays awardees prioritize community-engaged discoveries

The competitive fellowships send PhD students abroad for up to 12 months to build on their language proficiency, engage with other cultures and complete significant dissertation research on global cultures and societies.
Multi-colored terrain on Mars, seen from above

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Decadal survey sets agenda for biological, physical sciences in space

A&S Astronomy and Cornell Center for Astrophysical and Planetary Science (C-CAPS) faculty are key to “Thriving in Space,” released Sept. 12.
Orange fruit fly on a green backgroun

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NIH-funded fly study to pinpoint brain’s role in navigation

A NIH-funded project, led by Itai Cohen, professor of physics, will use the fruit fly to study how the brain processes multisensory information involved in flight, possibly offering insight into human neurological function.
a dark forest with sun rays

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DOE grant funds study of forests in changing climate

The Cornell-led team will conduct studies at two sites – in Hubbard Brook, New Hampshire, and in the Arnot Forest, near Ithaca – to gain a better understanding of the nitrogen cycle.
tiny island sprouting palm trees and a few buildings

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From bottom up, bureaucrats elevate climate change as priority

Climate has gained priority, driven by bureaucrats who learn about its importance in highly vulnerable countries and then spread that knowledge.
pink ball suspended in a purple field

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Promising quantum state found during error correction research

A team of Cornell researchers unexpectedly discovered the presence of a “quantum spin-glass” while conducting research designed to learn more about quantum algorithms.
Jamelle Bouie

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NYT columnist to be featured at Kops Lecture

Jamelle Bouie, columnist for the New York Times, will be the featured speaker at the 2023 Daniel W. Kops Freedom of the Press Lecture Sept. 12.
scientific image showing a broad gray area with webs of colors at the far right end

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New research sheds light on origins of social behaviors

The fruit fly’s visual system, not just chemical receptors, are deeply involved with their social behaviors.
person sitting with records and other items around them

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From breaking to Beyoncé: Hip Hop Collection empowers students

Cornell's collection is the largest hip-hop collection in the world.
person on top of mountain

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Einaudi Center welcomes new and returning program directors

Climate justice will be a priority across the Einaudi Center this year.
Tree branches bearing yellow leaves in front of an illuminated window

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Five early-career professors win NSF development awards

Philippe Sosoe, mathematics, is among those at Cornell who recently received National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development Awards.
Looking down into a large scientific facility dominated by a blue ring the size of an auditorium

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Latest muon measurement doubles precision

A Cornell team is designing some of the technology that captures the muon data.
Yellow metal array of almost-triangles on a blue-green background

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Hummingbird beak points the way to future micro machine design

Building smaller and smaller machines is not simply a matter of shrinking the components.
long plank with smaller arms coming off it and a long rod of metal with a loop at the end suspended over it

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Current takes a surprising path in quantum material

The findings will help settle a decades-long debate and offers insights that will inform the development of topological materials for next-generation quantum devices.
Students standing around an open wastewater treatment facility, which looks like a big cement rectangle with green water and wooden separaters.

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Engaged Opportunity Grants fund projects from Tompkins to Tanzania

The funded community-engaged learning projects provide opportunities for students to excavate ancient Pompeii, establish a community garden in Moshi, Tanzania and more.
A rainbow against a deep blue sky, over a brick building with a peaked roof

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Balance, Nicholson honored for research, teaching and service

Two faculty members in the College of Arts and Sciences are the recipients of the 2023 Faculty Award for Excellence in Research, Teaching and Service through Diversity.
purple dots in a grid against a turquoise background

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Imaging shows microbes turning CO2 into bioplastic

"We provide quantitative assessments of protein behaviors and also a mechanistic understanding of how the electron transport occurs from the semiconductor to the bacteria cell.”
Grey sphere backed by the darkness of space

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James Webb Space Telescope sees Jupiter moons in a new light

A Cornell astronomer who is part of JWST’s Early Release Science program report the first detection of hydrogen peroxide on Ganymede and sulfurous fumes on Io, both the result of Jupiter’s domineering influence.
Vials of colored substances

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Blamed for fouling the environment, polyester may help save it

A Cornell team has created a way to reuse some polyester compounds to make fabrics and to halt the proliferation of garment waste in landfills.
Illustration of a molecule featuring spheres attached by black rods

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Bulky size frustrates radical molecules to boost chemical reactions

The technique, the approach of a new Cornell-led collaboration, could prove to be a boon for creating new and improved derivatives of pharmaceutical compounds.
Person in a white lab coat piping something into a test tube

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Space-ready menstrual cup a giant leap for womankind

“With AstroCup, what we really wanted was not only to launch the cup but to launch this conversation.”
Ray Jayawardhana

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A&S dean Jayawardhana named provost at Johns Hopkins

Rachel Bean, the Jacob Gould Schurman Professor in the Department of Astronomy and senior associate dean for math and science, has been named interim A&S dean.
Two people sit on the ground; one types on a laptop, the other holds a compact disc

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Music student helps expand Ethiopian nun’s musical legacy_image

Thomas Feng, a doctoral student in performance practice, is identifying and cataloging the piano music of the late Emahoy Tsege-Mariam Gebru, a composer with a cult following.
Dark image with squares in the center

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Breakthrough identifies new state of topological quantum matter

A crystalline yet superconducting state in a new and unusual superconductor could have significant consequences for quantum computing.
Blue pattern

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Machine learning enhances X-ray imaging of nanotextures

Intricate nanotextures in thin-film materials offer scientists a new, streamlined approach to analyzing potential candidates for quantum computing and microelectronics.
graphic showing a human head in a circle surrounded by computer-style wiring

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New center merges math, AI to push frontiers of science

The Scientific Artificial Intelligence Center is being launched with a grant from the Office of Naval Research.
Two people sitting face to face, one's back turned

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Online ‘sexual double standard’ disadvantages women

In a new Cornell psychology study, female applicants for scholarships or jobs were viewed less favorably than males when study participants, acting as decision-makers, were shown “sexy” social media photos of the applicants.
Andy Shin

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Student veteran celebrates July Fourth as a new citizen

After graduating high school, enlisting in the U.S. Army, and nearly finishing his undergraduate studies at Cornell – Andy Shin '23, M.P.A. '25 gained his citizenship last November.
illustration of gravitaional waves

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After 15 years, gravitational waves detected as cosmic ‘hum’

A 15-year collaboration in which Cornell astrophysicists have played leading roles has found the first evidence of gravitational waves slowly undulating through the galaxy.
Steven Jackson

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Steven Jackson named vice provost for academic innovation

“Teaching is at the center of what we do,” said Jackson, who has a with a dual appointment in the Department of Science and Technology Studies.
Black and white image of two people sitting on a bench, seen from behind

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Spouses sharing friends may live longer after widowhood

New Cornell sociology research: The “widowhood effect” – the tendency for married people to die in close succession – is accelerated when spouses don’t know each other’s friends well.
Illustration of three planets side-by-side

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Exoplanet may reveal secrets about the edge of habitability

A recently discovered exoplanet may be key to solving how close a rocky planet can be to a star, and still sustain water and life.
Richard Miller

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Political philosopher Richard Miller dies at 77

Remembered as "a remarkable scholar and teacher, a true polymath," Miller was heralded for extending traditional boundaries of philosophy to incorporate the social sciences.
Illustration: seven human figures at the bottom, connected to pathways containing yellow and blue circles representing DNA

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Lingering effects of Neanderthal DNA found in modern humans

A research team has developed computational genetic tools to address the genetic effects of interbreeding between humans and Neanderthals.
Person gesturing to two others: a theatre director at work

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Theatre collaboration sets stage for community engagement

A&S faculty and students are part "Fertile Grounds,” a community-based play premiered by Ithaca theater organization Civic Ensemble.
Several people in long red robes and black caps walk in a line against a red background; one turns to give a thumbs up

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Ph.D. graduates celebrated for contributions to knowledge

Cornell’s newest doctoral graduates crossed the line "from students to scholars" at the 2023 Ph.D. Recognition Ceremony May 27.
Steven Strogatz in front of a blackboard with "small world" and an illustration on it showing a circle and interconnected lines inside

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Mathematical model that ‘changed everything’ turns 25

The work, along with a few subsequent papers, ushered in the modern era of network science – the results of which are ubiquitous in today’s world.
Steven Strogatz standing next to a table of students who are working on a math problem

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$5M gift establishes first-of-its-kind professorship in math and science outreach

Distinguished mathematician, award-winning teacher and well-known science communicator Steven Strogatz has been appointed as the inaugural holder of the Winokur chair.
person speaks into a microphone

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Merrill Scholars honor mentors at 35th annual ceremony

Forty-three student scholars, including nine from Arts and Sciences, were honored at this year’s 35th Merrill Presidential Scholars ceremony on May 23.
Two whales swim in a dark blue underwater scene

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Cornell Atkinson awards $1.6M in seed grants

The Cornell Atkinson Center for Sustainability’s Academic Venture Fund will support 11 new projects across nine colleges; three include Arts & Sciences investigators.
Two people stand with crossed arms in front of a large, complicated machine

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HERACLES beamline to accelerate cathode research

Cornell is breaking new ground in electron beam research with the HERACLES beamline, a state-of-the-art electron gun that mimics the harsh environments of the world’s largest particle colliders.
Digital image of purple building-like shapes emerging from a blue floor

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Kreps: Generative AI holds promise, peril for democracies

Popularized in 2022 by Open AI’s ChatGPT, generative artificial intelligence threatens to undermine trust in democracies when misused, but may also be harnessed for public good.
People sitting in a college classroom

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CTI announces 2023 Active Learning Postdoctoral Fellowship recipients

These grants provide a unique opportunity for faculty who are new to active learning and want to learn more or for those who want to expand upon initial efforts in implementing these teaching strategies.
Grid of 20 black and white images of an oblong shape: a brain seen from above

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Diversity of neurons affects memory, study finds

Understanding this diversity could lead to better knowledge of the brain’s computational flexibility and memory capacity.
Illustration in bright red of Earth and a doctor's gloved hand

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$2.5M in A&S New Frontier Grants supports bold projects

A&S faculty members will delve into questions ranging from quantum computing to foreign policy development and from heritage forensics to effects of climate change.
star-like crystals on a green background

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Picking up good vibrations – of proteins – at CHESS

A new method for analyzing protein crystals – developed by Cornell researchers and given a funky two-part name – could open up applications for new drug discovery and other areas of biotechnology and biochemistry.
Three ponds reflect trees and sky

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Einaudi seed grants finding fertile soil

Faculty from six colleges across Cornell tackle issues ranging from the health of endangered wild dogs to the spread of misinformation through social media.
Illustration: stack of blue grids shot through with green and red glowing lines

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Cornell, Google first to detect key to quantum computing future

The method, realized in theory by Prof. Eun-Ah Kim and Yuri Lensky, could protect bits of quantum information by storing them nonlocally.