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Ancient ship underbody, just a skeleton of wood

Article

Almonds, pottery and wood help date famed Kyrenia shipwreck

The Cornell Tree-Ring Laboratory identified the likeliest timeline of the Hellenistic-era ship's sinking as between 296-271 BCE, with a strong probability it occurred between 286-272 BCE.
solar panels under a sun rise

Article

‘Two-for-one’ fission aims to improve solar cell efficiency

A Cornell-led team used ultrafast laser spectroscopy to scrutinize a key intermediate state during singlet fission and found that in certain molecules the intermediate can be directly generated with a strikingly simple technique.
Dark background with a pattern of white dots in diagonal lines

Article

Backdoor method creates high-entropy material at lower temps

An interdisciplinary team developed a backchannel method that uses solubility, not entropy, to overcome thermodynamic constraints and synthesize high-entropy oxide nanocrystals at lower temperatures.
Book cover: Wisecracks

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Philosopher mines the ethical line in caustic wisecracking

In his new book, David Shoemaker, professor of philosophy, explores the need for spirited, sometimes prickly humor and the ethics that distinguish an innocent gibe from an offensive insult.
Nicholas Kiefer

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Nicholas Kiefer, economist and ‘towering intellect,’ dies at 73

Nicholas Kiefer, an economist whose deep curiosity and sharp insights into statistics and economic theory enabled him to parse a range of financial and banking systems, died March 12.
Graph showing a curve sprinkled with rainbow dots

Article

Replica theory shows deep neural networks think alike

A collaboration between researchers from Cornell and the University of Pennsylvania found that most successful deep neural networks follow a similar trajectory in the same “low-dimensional” space.
J. Robert Lennon

Article

Lennon chases down literary thrills in new series

J. Robert Lennon’s “weird hike through the wilderness” of publishing has led him to a new and unexpected place: writing his first thriller, “Hard Girls,” published Feb. 20 by Mulholland Books.
metal puck levitates above a slightly pitted white surface

Article

'Flawed' material resolves superconductor conundrum

Researchers developed a more controlled way of making nickelates, a material that could potentially help pinpoint the key qualities that enable high-temperature superconductivity.
Book cover: Critical Hits

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From pages to pixels: Writers offer literary take on video games

In “Critical Hits,” a new essay anthology co-edited by J. Robert Lennon, writers explore their own experiences with video games, and how those simulated worlds connect to real life.
Book cover: The Activist Humanist

Article

Humanists have the power and the tools to fight climate change

Humanities scholars have an important role to play in the current political struggle to stave off environmental collapse, Caroline Levine argues in her new book.
Pattern in green, blue and yellow

Article

Tiny networks intertwine to mimic design of bird colors

The resulting materials could prove useful in a variety of applications, from making sustainable pigments to energy storage and filtration.
 Multi-colored terrain on Mars, seen from above

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Decadal survey sets agenda for biological, physical sciences in space

A&S Astronomy and Cornell Center for Astrophysical and Planetary Science (C-CAPS) faculty are key to “Thriving in Space,” released Sept. 12.
Looking down into a large scientific facility dominated by a blue ring the size of an auditorium

Article

Latest muon measurement doubles precision

A Cornell team is designing some of the technology that captures the muon data.
Yellow metal array of almost-triangles on a blue-green background

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Hummingbird beak points the way to future micro machine design

Building smaller and smaller machines is not simply a matter of shrinking the components.
long plank with smaller arms coming off it and a long rod of metal with a loop at the end suspended over it

Article

Current takes a surprising path in quantum material

The findings will help settle a decades-long debate and offers insights that will inform the development of topological materials for next-generation quantum devices.
purple dots in a grid against a turquoise background

Article

Imaging shows microbes turning CO2 into bioplastic

"We provide quantitative assessments of protein behaviors and also a mechanistic understanding of how the electron transport occurs from the semiconductor to the bacteria cell.”
Illustration of a molecule featuring spheres attached by black rods

Article

Bulky size frustrates radical molecules to boost chemical reactions

The technique, the approach of a new Cornell-led collaboration, could prove to be a boon for creating new and improved derivatives of pharmaceutical compounds.
Richard Miller

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Political philosopher Richard Miller dies at 77

… at Chinese University of Hong Kong. Other honors include fellowships with the National Endowment for the Humanities, …
Campus buildings seen from above, under a partly cloudy sky

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Cornellians named Schwarzman, Goldwater and Udall scholars

Three students and a recent graduate have won national scholarships that will prepare them for future global leadership and careers in STEM and public service.
Yellow paper with six sides and six holes on each side folded together into a shape

Article

Self-folding origami machines powered by chemical reaction

The approach could one day lead to the creation of a new fleet of tiny autonomous devices that can rapidly respond to their chemical environment.
a drawing showing a round disk of gray with a green arrow encircling it hovering above a purple disk with a red arrow going in the other direction. Gold colored thick lines run from the bottom disk.

Article

Magnetic imaging unlocks crucial property of 2D superconductor

“I’m excited that we can use this tool now and apply it to this large class of really fascinating superconductors, which are a rich playground in condensed matter physics for realizing extraordinary superconducting phenomena.”
Tamika Nunley

Article

Historian explores limits of justice for enslaved women in Virginia

The creation of slave laws throughout the antebellum South can be traced back to the legal system in Virginia.
book cover: Subsurface

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Book goes underground to find how climate change shapes stories

Prof. Karen Pinkus confronts the global threat of climate change by using select literary works from the 19th century.
three people use a wheeled machine on a grassy plot of land

Article

Radar, AI identify Alaska Native Spanish flu victims burial site

The finding helps clarify the historical record for the Indigenous communities devastated by the 1918-19 pandemic.
Dark blue background with two orange mice (a thermal image)

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Imaging captures social dynamics of 'pee-shy' mice

Cornell research is shining a new light – via thermal imaging of mice – on how urine scent mark behavior changes depending on shifting social conditions.
Purple field showing a lattice pattern and orange and yellow highlights

Article

Semiconductor lattice marries electrons and magnetic moments

A model system created by stacking a pair of monolayer semiconductors is giving physicists a simpler way to study confounding quantum behavior.
White flag showing a red, white and blue skull graphic in front of a campus clock tower

Article

Dead & Co. to play benefit at Barton Hall, honoring legendary ’77 show

Remaining members of the Grateful Dead will return to play a benefit concert in Barton Hall on May 8 as part of the band’s final tour.
Hand holding a colorful rectangle

Article

Postcards from Earth: Hologram project showcased at Intrepid

A yearslong effort to launch Cornell-made satellite technology into a neighboring solar system is making a terrestrial stop at the Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum in New York City.
Dry landscape featuring a hill and partly cloudy sky

Article

Rare drought coincided with Hittite Empire collapse

An interdisciplinary collaboration used tree ring and isotope records to pinpoint a likely culprit: three straight years of severe drought in an already dry period.
DNA strand

Article

Tweezers untangle chemotherapeutic’s impact on DNA

New research into a common chemotherapy agent is advancing the study of cancer inhibitors.
golden spheres connected by dark lines

Article

Electrochemistry converts carbon to useful molecules

Cornell chemists discovered they could produce two products used in medicinal chemistry by changing the electrochemical reactor.
Golden honeycomb pattern over black

Article

Cornell to lead new semiconductor research center

Dan Ralph, Ph.D. ’93, the F.R. Newman Professor of Physics, is among the center’s 25 principal investigators.
Cover of Science Advances showing fruit fly

Article

Fruit flies use two muscles to control pitch for stable flight

The finding provides evidence for an organizational principle in which each muscle has a specific function in flight control.
Composit image of a man wearing glasses, a purple moon, a mountain, and a metal monument

Article

Fictional civilization leaves behind lasting legacy

Llhuros – its relics, rituals, poetry, and music – as well as the academic commentary it inspired, "documents just one tiny little sliver of Cornell’s history. But it’s a fascinating one.”
Magnified image shows an arrow-shaped embryo, glowing red, yellow and purple at the edges, appearing to give off red smoke

Article

Cornell chemists contributed to Nobel Prize-winning work

Jeremy M. Baskin and Pamela Chang were doctoral students in Carolyn Bertozzi’s lab at the University of California, Berkley, in the mid-2000s.
Two people wearing gloves work with football-sized museum object

Article

Mummified bird gets second life in multisensory exhibition

“A Tale of Two Mummies: Multisensory Experience” runs Oct. 7-9, from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., in Upson Hall’s Lounge 116.
Book cover: State of Disaster

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Book: Policymakers are failing ‘climate refugees’

The United States must transform its outdated migration policies to address the human devastation that is left in the wake of climate change and environmental catastrophe, Maria Cristina Garcia argues.
Illustration of a blocky silver robot

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Brains on board: Smart microrobots walk autonomously

Electronic “brains” on solar-powered robots that are smaller than an ant’s head allow them to walk by themselves.
Red cliffs reaching down to blue ocean; a city of white buildings appears small

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Statistical analysis aims to solve Greek volcano mystery

Sturt Manning has zeroed in on a much narrower range of dates, approximately 1609–1560 BCE, for the eruption on Santorini, a pivotal event in the prehistory of the region.
Ancient stone building with a spire and foliage growing on the roof

Article

Report shows near-total erasure of Armenian heritage sites

The study compiled decades of high-resolution satellite imagery from the Nakhchivan Autonomous Republic of Azerbaijan.
James Turner, the founding director of Cornell’s Africana Studies and Research Center and a a professor emeritus of African and African American Politics and Social Policy in the College of Arts and Sciences,

Article

James Turner, a ‘giant’ of Africana studies, dies at 82

James Turner, the founding director of Cornell’s Africana Studies and Research Center and a pioneer of the multidisciplinary approach to exploring the African diaspora, died Aug. 6 in Ithaca.
Book cover: Sonorous Desert

Article

Desert sounds offer lessons in solitude and community

In a new book, Kim Haines-Eitzen explores the rich range of desert sounds and what they can teach us about place, the past, solitude and community.
Book cover: Adventure Capitalism

Article

Think twice before founding that free-market utopia

In a new book, Raymond Craib writes that libertarian attempts to escape regulation and build communities structured entirely through market transactions often have calamitous consequences for local populations.
Wei Wang, in a blue shirt and black plastic-framed glasses, sits in a lab looking at an instrument while he adjusts another instrument with his right hand.

Article

Artificial cilia could someday power diagnostic devices

The technology could enable low-cost, portable diagnostic devices for testing blood samples, manipulating cells or assisting in microfabrication processes.
The sun shining over a field next to a powerplant spewing huge clouds into the air.

Article

Spongy material captures carbon dioxide in cavities

The materials are made from sugar and low-cost alkali metal salts, so they would be inexpensive enough for large-scale deployment.
Stop motion images of a dragonfly turning over in flight

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Dragonflies use vision, subtle wing control to straighten up and fly right

As one of the oldest insect species on the planet, dragonflies are an early innovator of aerial flight.
Shiny spikes organized into a sphere

Article

Mechanism ‘splits’ electron spins in magnetic material

Cornell researchers have discovered a technique that could eventually lead to the development of more energy-efficient magnetic memory devices.
Spots of orange light against a dark background

Article

Light-infused particles go the distance in organic semiconductors

Prof. Andrew Musser and his team have found a way to tune the speed of polaritons' energy flow, using an approach that could eventually lead to more efficient solar cells, sensors and LEDs.
A.R. Ammons

Article

‘Ammons & the Falls’ highlights poet’s ties to Ithaca landscape

The April 26 celebration will include the unveiling of a new display of Ammons’ poem “Triphammer Bridge," a screening of an episode of “Poetry in America," and more.
Circular logo that says John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation around the outside and 1925 on the inside

Article

Musicologist and poet awarded Guggenheim fellowships

… this year, selected from nearly 2,500 applicants. The fellowships are awarded on the basis of prior achievement and … Popular Music, among other recognitions. He has received fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies, … textblock … Musicologist and poet awarded Guggenheim fellowships