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Byline: Linda B. Glaser

A drawing of the telescope at the mountain site, with a person next to it to show how large it is.

Article

Cornell-led telescope project completion in sight

The Fred Young Submillimeter Telescope “will be able to look regularly at frequency ranges very few other telescopes can even detect."
Andrew Morse

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Morse named A&S Zubrow Distinguished Visiting Journalist

Recently appointed president and publisher of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Andrew Morse ’96, a former leader at CNN, Bloomberg and ABC News, will be on campus in March and April.
Three people handle chemistry equipment in a lab

Article

Chemist wins National Academy of Science award

Geoffrey Coates’ discoveries have revolutionized polymer recycling, materials for green hydrogen generation, and the synthesis of sustainable plastics.
A white box with a lense on the right end with complex equipment on the underside; a sensor bound for Mars

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Perseverance rover records sound of dust devils on Mars

Thanks to the first working microphone to traverse the surface of Mars, the sound of a tiny, extraterrestrial dust tornado has reached Earth.
Riccardo Giovanelli

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Eminent astronomer Riccardo Giovanelli dies at 76

An observational cosmologist studying the structure, evolution and environments of galaxies, Giovanelli had broad research interests.
Collage of black and white text fragments shaped like a fiddle

Article

Freedom on the Move project inspires music performances

A Cornell-based database of “runaway ads” placed by enslavers in 18th- and 19th-century U.S. newspapers was the starting point for a new song cycle, “Songs in Flight,” that will premiere Jan. 12 in New York City.
Stone tower with a tree in front of it; a flock of birds perched in the branches

Article

Physicist receives DOE grant for particle accelerator research

With $410,000 Ivan Bazarov will research long lifetime spin-polarized electron sources in particle accelerators.
Book cover: Genetic Afterlives

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‘Genetic Afterlives’ receives book prize

Anthropologist Noah Tamarkin has received the Jordan Schnitzer Book Award from the Association for Jewish Studies in the category of social science, anthropology, and folklore.
abstract pattern featuring green dots in neat rows, intersected by orange lines

Article

Physicist identifies how electron crystals melt

Eun-Ah Kim and Michael Matty, M.S. ’19, Ph.D. ’22, describe a phase in between the liquid and the solid for electron structures.
model

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New research reveals how genes turn on and off

Yeast has revealed for Cornell researchers a key mechanism in how genes are controlled.
Person speaks in front of a class sitting using dynamic hand gestures

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Grant supports language learning research

“Understanding the impact of Languages Across the Curriculum on all participants will allow us to build on its success and offer multilingual students more opportunities to engage with their disciplinary content in languages other than English."
Seamus Davis

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Prestigious Buckley Prize awarded to physicist J.C. Séamus Davis

Quantum microscopes based on Davis designs have galvanized quantum materials visualization studies globally.
Multi-colored ribbons of light form the infinity symbol

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Cornell mathematician featured in Netflix film

“The main idea of the film involves an exploration of infinity from several perspectives: mathematical, physical, philosophical, theological."
Chorale members standing in four rows in front of a stone building with stone archway

Article

Chorale is back!’ says new director

“We welcome singers from any department of the university and from the community,” said Michael Poll, music director and Klarman Fellow.
White-haired smiling man with hands clasped in front of his stomach, wearing a blue blazer and dress shirt.

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Frank Drake ’51, astronomy pioneer, dies at 92

“Frank Drake was a pioneer of radio astronomy and the search for extraterrestrial intelligence using radio telescopes."
Antonio Fernandez-Ruiz 

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Neuroscientist receives Freedman Prize

Antonio Fernandez-Ruiz has been awarded the 2022 Freedman Prize, which recognizes exceptional clinical and basic research in mental illness.  
3-D shapes, black on top and orange red beneath, in a square of textured gray

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Ice Age human footprints discovered in Utah desert

Altogether 88 footprints were documented, including both adults and children, offering insight into family life in the time of the Pleistocene.
Stephan's Quntet

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Cornell astronomers cheer new space telescope’s first images

Faculty respond to the release of the first images from the James Webb Space Telescope.
Ann Simmons smiling, with very short hair, red lipstick, earrings and a black jacket over a black top.

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WSJ Moscow Bureau Chief named A&S Zubrow Visiting Journalist for fall 2022

“We’re privileged to host Ann Simmons on campus at this time of global turmoil to share her deep insights with the Cornell community,” said Ray Jayawardhana, the Harold Tanner Dean of Arts and Sciences.
Martha Haynes with glasses, shoulder-length gray hair in a red top, with blurred stars on screen behind her

Article

‘Follow your dreams,’ writes astronomer Martha Haynes

“The Sky Is for Everyone” is a collection of autobiographical essays by “women who broke down barriers and changed the face of modern astronomy.”
J Nation blowing on an instrument made out of long white pipes, with a yellow balloon attached

Article

Instrument-building festival challenges, inspires

Hosted by the Cornell ReSounds Project, the FutureSounds Festival featured guest builders and performers as well as newly designed instruments and compositions by Cornell students.
The three researchers are sitting around a desk and Ailong Ke is pointing to an image of the IscB molecule on the computer screen.

Article

Discovery offers starting point for better gene-editing tools

“Transposons are specialized genetic hitchhikers, integrating into and splicing out of our genomes all the time...by defining these enzymes in high resolution, we can tap into their powers.”
An African man's head with a ray-like collar above the face of a roaring lion with other artwork from the Sculpture Shoppe exhibition in the background.

Article

Contemporary and ancient art exhibit enlivens Ithaca Mall

The “Sculpture Shoppe” exhibition displays selections from Cornell’s plaster cast collection of Greco-Roman sculptures alongside – and sometimes within – contemporary artists’ responses to cast culture and classical art.
Glowing orange circle against a black background

Article

Team reveals first image of the black hole at our galaxy’s heart

Cornell researchers contributed to the first direct visual evidence of something compact and very massive at the center of the Milky Way.
Modern building, illuminated windows a sunset

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Graduate student selected for DOE program

Zepyoor Khechadoorian’s project in high energy physics will be the measurement of the muon anomalous magnetic moment, working with Fermilab advisor Chris Polly.
Flat ground and four construction vehicles; mountians in background

Article

Major progress made in construction of Fred Young Submillimeter Telescope

Project scientists are looking forward to collecting data that will give them insight into the universe’s earliest days; the telescope will also play a role in the search for gravitational waves and dark matter.
Installation by artist Rhonda Weppler, featuring cast resin fungi and Cornell’s cast of the Apollo Sauroktonos.

Article

Sculpture Shoppe launches with ancient Greek song performance

The Sculpture Shoppe, located in a former retail space in Ithaca Mall, will be open through the month of May.
Person wearing graduation cap, seen from the back

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Girls raised by Jewish parents more likely to graduate college

Researchers from Cornell, Tulane and Stanford universities concluded that girls raised by at least one Jewish parent acquire a particular way of viewing the world that influences their education choices, career aspirations and various other experiences.
Three people wearing lab coats and protective glasses

Article

Chemist Song Lin honored by Chemical & Engineering News

Lin said he is honored and proud to be included in a special LGBTQ+ Trailblazers issue of the newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.
Marc Lacey

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Alum Marc Lacey named managing editor of the New York Times

In his new role, Lacey, Arts & Sciences' inaugural Distinguished Visiting Journalist, will oversee the breadth of the paper's news operation.
J.J. Zanazzi sitting on a white wooden bench underneath a leafless tree, writing in a notebook; smiling.

Article

Astronomy alum chosen for 51 Pegasi b Fellowship

J.J. Zanazzi, Ph.D. ’18, has been selected for a 2022 51 Pegasi b Fellowship, which provides exceptional postdoctoral scientists with the opportunity to conduct theoretical, observational, and experimental research in planetary astronomy.
Person speaking at the front of a room

Article

Visiting journalist: Science writing is ‘good for the world’

On March 15, award-winning science journalist Natalie Wolchover, the College's Zubrow Distinguished Visiting Journalist, gave a master class on “Bringing Science to Life Through Storytelling.”
Natalie Wolchover

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Award-winning journalist offers master class on science storytelling

The class will cover how to turn discoveries in science and mathematics into compelling, accurate narratives that engage lay readers and scientists alike.
Maya Phillips

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New York Times critic at large wins 2020-21 Nathan Award

Maya Phillips, a critic at large for The New York Times, has been named winner of the 2020-21 George Jean Nathan Award for Dramatic Criticism. The award committee comprises the heads of the English departments of Cornell, Princeton and Yale Universities.
Morten Christiansen

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Psychology professor elected to Denmark’s Royal Academy

Morten H. Christiansen, William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of Psychology in the College of Arts and Sciences, has been elected a foreign member of the Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and Letters.
Logo for the Arts Unplugged showing an outline of a city with computer like design, spelling out "small"

Article

Science of the very, very small featured in next Arts Unplugged

The event will explore the nanoscale and quantum innovations shaping our future. You can join online at eCornell!
Trevor Pinch smiling and holding his book "The Golem at Large"

Article

Pioneering professor Trevor Pinch dies at 69

Trevor Pinch, Distinguished Professor of Arts and Sciences in Science and Technology Studies in the College of Arts and Sciences, who helped found multiple areas of study related to science, technology and sound, died Dec. 16.
Legislative chamber

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‘Tipping point’ of polarization threatens democracy’s survival

In a new study, researchers have identified a point beyond which extreme political polarization becomes irreversible.
artificial intelligence graphic with brain,  lights and circuits

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AI innovators to speak at Cornell BrAIn symposium Dec. 9-10

The symposium will bring together innovators to explore the connections being forged between neurotechnology, deep learning, natural intelligence and AI.
Paul Ginsparg

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arXiv founder Ginsparg wins Einstein Foundation Berlin Award

The inaugural Einstein Foundation Berlin Award for Promoting Quality in Research by the Einstein Foundation has been awarded to Paul Ginsparg, professor of physics in the College of Arts and Sciences and professor of information science in the Cornell Ann S. Bowers College of Computing and Information Science, for his work in developing arXiv.org, the first platform to make scientific preprints immediately available globally.
The cover of Trans Historical showing a person with long red hair and a mustache.

Article

New edited volume explores plurality of gender experiences

“The book is a collection of essays about trans, nonbinary and gender-complicated people across a broad geographic range, from Poland to France to early Colonial America, going all the way back to Byzantine and Ancient Roman writings.”
A multi-colored image of the Crab Nebula

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Cornell faculty contribute to Astro2020 decadal survey

A quarter of the faculty from the Department of Astronomy participated in the newly released decadal survey sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Air Force.
woman with microphone

Article

Transdisciplinary film explores Trinidad and Tobago

“We Love We Self Up Here” is a new documentary focused on the complex histories of labor and migration in Trinidad and Tobago.
Malott Hall with a banner saying "curiosity, discovery, creativity" in front of it.

Article

Cornell mathematicians featured at International Congress of Mathematicians

Five Cornell mathematicians -- an unusually high number -- have been invited to speak at the world-renowned International Congress of Mathematicians (ICM) this year.
Jamila Michener, Assistant Professor of Government

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Michener testifies to House committee about health care

Health is an exceptionally expensive resource in the United States, “though it should not be,” political scientist Jamila Michener told the House Rules Committee on Oct. 13.
Andy Strominger

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Hans Bethe Lecture to illuminate black hole paradox

This year's Hans Bethe Lecture, “Probing the Edges of the Universe: Black Holes, Horizons and Strings,” will be on Wed., Oct. 27 at 7:30 pm in the David Call Alumni Auditorium, Kennedy Hall.
people at tables

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New moral psychology minor takes on challenging questions

… approaches to problem-solving make it the ideal place for this new minor. This minor invites students to explore … minor was developed with the help of a grant from David M. Einhorn Center for Community Engagement, and will be housed in the …
Dried up and cracking river bed

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Grant to fund conference on climate change in South Asia

A Cornell-led international team of researchers has received a $65,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) for its project, “The Next Monsoon: Climate Change and Contemporary Cultural Production in South Asia.”
Blue circles and lines showing neutrino trail in bubble chamber

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A&S Dean featured in PBS/BBC documentary

Astronomer Ray Jayawardhana, the Harold Tanner Dean of Arts and Sciences, is featured in “Particles Unknown,” airing Oct. 6.
Natalie Wolchover wearing a blck shirt and earrings

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Natalie Wolchover named A&S Zubrow Visiting Journalist for Spring 2022

The program brings accomplished journalists to Cornell each year to interact with faculty, researchers and students.
Nikole Hannah-Jones

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Creator of 1619 Project to give Kops Lecture

Nikole Hannah-Jones, the Pulitzer Prize-winning creator of the 1619 Project and a staff writer at The New York Times Magazine, will give the Daniel W. Kops Freedom of the Press Lecture on Sept. 9 at 5 p.m.
Modern building lit up at dusk, seen from above

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Applications now open for Klarman postdoc fellowships in A&S

Applications are now being accepted for the third cohort of the Klarman Postdoctoral Fellowships program in the College of Arts and Sciences. The deadline for submission is Oct. 15.
Students in biology class

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$2M grant to fund assessment of biology education

Funding for the five-year project derived from the NSF’s Vision and Change Program.
DNA helix

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New technique illuminates DNA helix

Cornell researchers have identified a new way to measure DNA torsional stiffness – how much resistance the helix offers when twisted – information that can potentially shed light on how cells work.
spacecraft on a planet
Johns Hopkins/APL Artist's impression of Dragonfly in flight over Titan.

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Dragonfly mission to Titan announces big science goals

NASA’s Dragonfly mission, which will send a rotorcraft relocatable lander to Titan’s surface in the mid-2030s, will be the first mission to explore the surface of Titan, and it has big goals.
Saul Teukolsky

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Teukolsky awarded 2021 Dirac Medal

Saul Teukolsky, the Hans A. Bethe Professor of Physics and Astrophysics in the College of Arts and Sciences, has been awarded the International Centre for Theoretical Physics’ 2021 ICTP Dirac Medal and Prize for his contributions to the detection of gravitational waves.
woman

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Student Awards 2021-2022 TK

This is a page for review.
pixelated image of grey and blue texture
Davis lab/provided This composite image shows where the selenium atoms reside in the crystal of niobium diselenide, a transition metal dichalcogenide, using conventional scanned tunneling microscopy (left, in grey) and where the electron pairs are observed using scanned Josephson tunneling microscopy (right, in blue).

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Electron-pair discovery advances field of quantum materials

Physicist Séamus Davis and his team have found an exotic state of quantum matter.
Ekaterina Landgren
Sue Longhini Ekaterina Landgren

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Applied math/astronomy student receives Zonta Amelia Earhart Fellowship

Ph.D. student Ekaterina Landgren has received a 2021 Zonta Amelia Earhart Fellowship. The program recognizes women pursuing doctoral degrees in aerospace engineering and space sciences.
Red cylandar with wires
CCAT Observatory, Inc. Mod-Cam receiver for the Fred Young Submillimeter Telescope.

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Annual conference on new telescope moves science ahead

More than a hundred people gathered virtually at the end of April for the 2021 annual conference on the CCAT-prime project, which is building the Fred Young Submillimeter Telescope (FYST) in Chile. “First light” is scheduled for 2023.
Flowering tree

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Advising, teaching awards honor Arts and Sciences faculty

“During this challenging year, our faculty have demonstrated exemplary caring and commitment to our students."
A cityscape with tall buildings and smoke coming from a building

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Final ‘Racism in America’ webinar on April 27 to focus on our economic system

The webinar will feature four Cornell faculty experts looking at the past as well as present of the relationship of racism to capitalism and the unequal impact of COVID-19 on different sectors of the economy.
small helicopter flying over a barren, orange landscape
JPL/ NASA An illustration depicting Mars Helicopter Ingenuity during a test flight on Mars

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Roving Mars, by air and land

The Ingenuity helicopter and other rotorcraft could provide reconnaissance for rovers to help guide their routes.
Tree in bloom outside building with marble columns

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Dean announces transitions on Arts & Sciences leadership team

Ray Jayawardhana, the Harold Tanner Dean of Arts and Sciences, has announced transitions in the College’s senior leadership team that will take place on July 1.
Book cover: Constants of the Motion

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Poetry book by Nobel-winning chemist features science, nature

Roald Hoffmann received a Nobel Prize in 1981 for chemistry—and he’s been writing poetry since the 1970s. His fifth book of poetry, “Constants in Motion,” was recently published by Dos Madres Press. These poems interweave Hoffmann’s scientific perspective with his poetic sensibility.
Red book cover: How to Tell a Joke

Article

Translation updates Cicero’s treatise on jokes as ‘weapons’

Michael Fontaine’s lively new translation amuses as well as instructs.
Mother holding her child

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Health inequities the focus of ‘Racism in America’ webinar on March 29

The fourth webinar in our Racism in America series features faculty from A&S, CALS and Weill Cornell Medicine.
White blocky structure in a desert; mountains in background

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FYS Telescope partners in Canada receive new $4.9 million grant

A team of Canadian researchers have been awarded $4.9 million in funding from the Canada Foundation for Innovation to help build a next generation telescope, the Fred Young Submillimeter Telescope (FYST), part of the CCAT-prime project, an international collaboration including Cornell University.
Richard Boyd

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Pioneering philosopher Richard Boyd dies at 78

Richard Newell Boyd, the Susan Linn Sage Professor of Philosophy and Humane Letters Emeritus, died in his sleep in Cleveland, Ohio on Feb. 20. He was 78.
Poster featuring photo of woman and police officer

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‘Racism in America’ webinar to examine protest movements

Moderated by Kat Stafford, national investigative writer at The Associated Press, the webinar will feature five Cornell faculty experts.
Coiled snake, spitting venom
Wolfgang Wuster Mozambique spitting cobra

Article

Study: Did cobras first spit venom to scare pre-humans?

New research by Harry Greene, professor emeritus of ecology and evolutionary biology, suggests that for some cobras, the venom evolved additional complexity to deter potential enemies– possibly including bipedal, larger-brained hominins like Homo erectus, our extinct close relative.
Alexis Soloski
Provided Alexis Soloski, theater critic

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NY Times theater critic wins 2019-20 Nathan Award

Alexis Soloski’s articles about theater during the first months of the COVID-19 pandemic “transcended the limits of traditional reviews," the award committee said.
Smart phone showing graphic of U.S. map

Article

Roper Center hosts forum on public opinion polling

While some consider public opinion polls critical to democratic accountability, others question the ability of today’s pollsters to accurately reflect the public’s preferences on issues and candidates.

On Air sign near microphone

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Cornell faculty featured on ‘The Academic Minute’

The program, airing on 70 stations, covers new and emerging topics in higher education.
Bulldozers at the site of the telescope, with mountains in the background

Article

Ground broken in Chile for alum-backed telescope

The telescope itself will arrive in mid- to late 2022, with first light anticipated in 2023.
Person talking with two others

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Yuri Orlov memorial webinar held Nov. 18

Some of the world’s most prominent human-rights leaders honored the late Yuri Orlov, professor emeritus of physics in the College of Arts and Sciences, in a webinar Nov. 18 at 10 a.m.

Eye-glasses on top of a stack of books

Article

Reading series finale to feature Black feminist scholars

Black feminist scholars will examine the current socio-political and cultural moment in “Triangle Breathing: A Conversation with Hortense Spillers and Alexis Pauline Gumbs,” the final Barbara & David Zalaznick Reading Series: At Home virtual event of the fall.

A map showing redlining next to a school bus

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‘Racism in America’ webinar to examine education, housing

Join us at 7 p.m. Nov. 19 for the next event in this yearlong webinar series.
One of the ALMA telescopes in foreground with others in background

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Astronomers find evidence for a rapid evolution of galaxies in the early universe

"It rather seems to be the norm for galaxies to mature quite rapidly at these early epochs."
John Kerry

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John Kerry will speak at Belnick presidential forum Oct. 29

Former U.S. Sen. John Kerry, secretary of state in former President Barack Obama’s administration and 2004 Democratic presidential nominee, will be the Belnick Family LaFeber/Lowi Presidential Forum speaker Oct. 29 at 5 p.m. The virtual event is open to those with a Cornell NetID; registration is required.

Person with camera in a field, dark sky

Article

Alum’s film to be available for online sneak peek Oct. 16

Director Robert H. Lieberman ’62 takes viewers on a journey into the vast and little-known country of Mongolia in his latest film, “Echoes of the Empire: Beyond Genghis Khan,” in a one-week online sneak peek beginning Oct. 16.

Cornell Cinema and Cinemapolis of Ithaca are presenting the advance showings, ahead of the film’s international release. The film will be available for two-day rental, for $12.

Building on a hillside

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Physics graduate student receives DOE grant

Christopher Morrison Pierce, a doctoral candidate in the field of physics, has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for the Office of Science Graduate Student Research (SCGSR) Program.

Carl Sagan

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Jeep’s new ad will support the Carl Sagan Institute

The Carl Sagan Institute is getting a boost from an unexpected source: Fiat Chrysler Automotive’s ad for its new plug-in hybrid, Jeep’s Wrangler 4XE. The ad features the late Carl Sagan’s famous “Pale Blue Dot” monologue and images -- and for every view of the ad on Jeep’s Youtube channel, a donation will be made to the Carl Sagan Institute (CSI).
 

The top of the U.S. Capitol building, half in blue and half in red

Article

Polls, voters and election 2020: A&S webinar on Oct. 19

Polls don’t tell the whole story and many forecasts in 2016 were proved wrong: what can we expect this year?
Yuri Orlov

Article

Renowned dissident Yuri Orlov, professor emeritus, dies at 96

Internationally renowned physicist, human rights champion and Soviet-era dissident Yuri Orlov, professor emeritus of physics in the College of Arts and Sciences (A&S), died Sept. 27 in Ithaca. He was 96.

Fred Young standing in front of snow-covered mountain

Article

Breakthrough telescope in Chile renamed for benefactor alum

Fred Young ’64, M.Eng. ’66, MBA ’66 has been instrumental in keeping the telescope project moving forward.
Fred Young ’64, M.Eng. ’66, MBA ’66 in front of the summit of Cerro Chajnantor in the Atacama Desert of northern Chile, site for the Fred Young Submillimeter Telescope.

Article

Breakthrough telescope in Chile renamed for benefactor alum

The powerful new telescope being built for an exceptional high-elevation site in Chile by a consortium of U.S., German and Canadian academic institutions, led by Cornell, has a new name: the Fred Young Submillimeter Telescope (FYST).
Black Lives Matter protest, masked people holding signs of men who have been killed

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A&S launches ‘Racism in America’ webinar series Sept. 16

The year-long series features faculty experts and journalist moderators exploring the far-reaching impacts of institutional racism.
Ray Jayawardhana

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A&S dean Ray Jayawardhana awarded Carl Sagan Medal

The medal is given for excellence in public communication in planetary science.
Roger Livesay

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Roger Livesay, emeritus professor of math, dies at 95

G. Roger Livesay, professor emeritus of math in the College of Arts and Sciences, died Aug. 1 in Ithaca after a long illness. He was 95.

Livesay received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in 1948 from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, and his Ph.D. in 1952 from the same institution.

Person speaking on a stage

Article

A&S dean delivers keynote at K-12 ed conference

Jayawardhana showed teachers how the at-times esoteric subject matter of astronomy “is not only relevant but integral to our lives.”
Black woman doctor sitting in chair with stethoscope around her neck and expression of exhaustion

Article

Webinar to examine systemic racism, health equity

What can, and should, faculty members, staff, students and the community be doing in response to institutional racism and its role in shaping health equity?

Person holds a map and points to it

Article

New book explores maps as tools of political power

Maps are more than two-dimensional representations of three-dimensional terrain. They are also powerful political tools to control territory, as Cornell sociologist and science studies scholar Christine Leuenberger explains in her new book, “The Politics of Maps: Cartographic Constructions of Israel/Palestine,” co-written with Izhak Schnell of Tel Aviv University.

Young person, talking into microphone

Article

Study finds hidden emotions in the sound of words

New research reveals that the sound of the word "virus" was likely to raise your blood pressure – even before “corona” was added to it.
Robert and Carola Jain

Article

Alum establishes scholarship for Black students

The gift is part of the Cornell Promise initiative to support students in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.
Depiction of Rosa Parks made of fabric

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Richardson explores Rosa Parks’ life in new animated video

“One of our goals with the project was to spotlight dimensions of Rosa Parks that are less familiar and to help viewers move beyond the myths."
Cartoon of person working at a computer in front of a bright screen

Article

New video engages public in cosmic exploration

A new animation about two innovative telescopes being developed at Cornell has just been released by the research group led by Michael Niemack, associate professor of physics and astronomy in the College of Arts and Sciences.

The two-minute video explains how researchers are “measuring the oldest light in the universe with the highest telescopes on Earth.”

Hand putting ballot in box

Article

That swing: Many systems hinge on ‘pivotal components’

In a group decision-making process such as the one happening in the U.S. this November, swing voters are crucial. At least that’s the conventional wisdom.

Whether it’s a presidential election, a Supreme Court vote or a congressional decision – and especially in highly partisan environments, where the votes of the wings are almost guaranteed – the votes of the few individuals who seem to be in the middle could tip the scales.