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Byline: Kate Blackwood

Double helix strands made out of tiny blue beads against a dark blue background

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CRISPR insight: How to fine-tune the Cas protein’s grip on DNA

A new explanation of nanoscale mechanics by Michelle Wang's lab contributes to the future of CRISPR technology.
A black and white image of Tom Davis in suit and tie, wearing black plastic glasses and smiling.

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Economist Tom Davis dies at 93

Tom E. Davis, professor emeritus of economics, was an expert on economic development in Latin America.
Person speaking passionately into a microphone

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Anthology celebrates Nuyorican Poets Cafe founder

A digital and print collection, co-edited by Karen Jaime, pays tribute to the late Miguel Algarín.
A plate of Peruvian fried rice

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Goffe: Collaboration is key to major humanities grants

Grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Mellon Foundation will help make humanities research more accessible to scholars and the public.
Anil Menon

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Klarman fellow: How do past events affect political present?

Anil Menon is researching the political legacies of forced migration, which is on the rise globally due to climate change and conflict.
Baobao Zhang

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Zhang, Klarman fellow, named Schmidt Futures AI2050 Fellow

Zhang will work with the Center for New Democratic Processes to test whether public assemblies can be an effective method for increasing public participation in AI governance.
A few dozen men sit and stand in a group, talking intensely

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‘Young, male and aimless’: Why are men in India delaying marriage?

Economic changes in India are forcing adaptations in traditional marriage practices, but not enough for a modernizing overhaul to this deeply traditional institution.
Book cover: Black Women's Rights

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Book: Time for Black women to claim the right to lead

Extending her research on writing by Black women around the world, Carole Boyce Davies examines the stories of Black women political leaders in Africa and in the global African Diaspora.
abstract pattern

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$1.25M grant to advance control of 2D materials

The research will help give unprecedented insight into electron behavior and quantum phenomena.
Historical black and white photo of a person seated, in formal clothes and a serious expression

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‘Words as battle axes’: A&S professors appear in Frederick Douglass film

Derrick Spires, Edward Baptist, and Gerard Aching help tell the story of the man born into slavery who became an advocate for African American freedom. 
Arched hallway with sunlight

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Klarman fellow’s research prompts Stanford to investigate its practices

An archive discovery by Cornell historian Charles Petersen reported in an August 2021 newsletter prompted Stanford University to establish a task force to investigate its admissions practices for Jewish students in the 1950s.
Book cover: Space-Time Colonialism

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Juliana Hu Pegues wins ASA book prize for ‘Space-Time Colonialism’

The prize recognizes the best first book in American Studies released during 2021.
Book cover: Blood Novels

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‘Blood Novels’ explores material, metaphor in Spanish realist fiction

Julia Chang examines the presence of blood and its deeper literary and cultural meaning in novels by three Spanish authors.
Two squares: on the left, large squares of black, purple and green. On the right, much higher resolution

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Lipid expansion microscopy uses the ‘power of click chemistry’

Cornell researchers have discovered a way to apply expansion microscopy, which expands cell components to make them more visible, to lipids using click chemistry, recognized with the 2022 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.
A painting (generated by AI) depicts a person looking stressed while a bubble over his head reflects the colors of a scene outside his window

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Conference considers the Art & Science of Thinking Oct. 21-22

“We want to open a robust dialogue between humanists and scientists around the very notion of ‘thought’ and ‘thinking,."
Among several people in a tent, a woman in red traditional clothing faces three officials in white shirts and black trousers, sitting on a couch

Article

Creating ‘political economy of hope’ at Pakistan-India border

When politicians get close to constituents, either physically or digitally, they manage expectations and offer assurances to constituents. But they also expose themselves to scrutiny, giving people the chance to see beyond the performance into imperfect government workings.
Two-part illustration: on the left, a three-color wheel; on the right, an elongated tangle of blue, grey and purple threads

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Protein family shows how life adapted to oxygen

“By understanding the evolution of these proteins, we can understand how nature adapts to environmental changes at the molecular level. In turn, we also learn about our planet’s past.”
Person sitting in a chair, speaking dynamically

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What is ‘media?’ Klarman Fellow strives to define a capacious concept

Scholar, writer and crossword star Anna Shechtman bridges the academic study and the real-world practice of media.
Charles Kane

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2022 Bethe Lectures: Harnessing quantum matter for future technologies

Physicist Charles Kane will explain how mysterious features of quantum mechanics can be harnessed for future technologies on Oct. 19, 7:30 p.m.
Abstract blue, grey and black pattern

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Layering, not liquid: Astronomers explain Mars’ watery reflections

Using computer simulations, Cornell researchers demonstrate that strong reflections can be generated by interference between geological layers, without liquid water or other rare materials.
Todd Hyster

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Hyster wins Fresenius Award for early-career excellence

New tools being developed by the Hyster lab can be applied in the pharmaceutical and agrochemical industries.
Person wearing a hat in a sunny field, using electronc equipment

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Klarman Fellow tracks impact of social bonds on animal health

“My focus is on how an animal’s mother can impact a wide range of outcomes: in childhood, adulthood, and even between generations."
Margaret Rossiter

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Rossiter honored for 'writing women back into the history of science'

Her major work, “Women Scientists in America,” has redrawn the historical landscape of women in science.
Elizabeth Kellogg

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Kellogg honored for insight into mechanics of biological systems

The 2023 Margaret Oakley Dayhoff Award is given each year to a woman who has achieved prominence while in the early stages of a career in biophysical research.
Sydney Shoemaker

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Sydney Shoemaker, leading figure of Cornell philosophy, dies at 90

Remembered as a powerful thinker and brilliant teacher, Shoemaker contributed to the outstanding reputation of Cornell philosophy during the second half of the twentieth century,
Modern building rising into fog

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At global turning point, economists take stock of 100 years of development

Major figures in world economics will gather in Ithaca Sept. 15-17 to re-think the foundations of economics and the nature of regulation – with particular care for the environment.
Spiral galaxy

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UVEX NASA mission advances with Cornell astronomers on team

Cornell astronomers Anna Y. Q. Ho and Shrinivas R. Kulkarni are part of the mission team for the UltraViolet Explorer (UVEX) mission, which has advanced toward a 2028 launch with NASA.
Book cover: Organic Chemistry

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McMurry makes bestselling chemistry text free in memory of son

Starting fall 2023, the 10th edition of McMurry’s Organic Chemistry will be available an open educational resource (OER) through OpenStax.
Historic photo from 1873, of a young woman

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Lectures to unearth stories ‘that don’t get told’ in classical scholarship

Oxford scholar Constanze Güthenke will bring to light untold stories of classical scholarship during the 2022 Townsend Lectures Sept. 7, 9, and 12.
Several people sit on a shadowed lawn between university buildings

Article

Reporters discuss history of “land grab” universities in press freedom lecture

Journalist Tristan Ahtone and historian Robert Lee will talk about how Indigenous land expropriated by the 1862 Morrill Act is the foundation of the land-grant university system in the 2022 Kops Lecture.
Green lawn intersected by gray paths, seen from the air

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A&S opens application portal for Klarman postdoc fellowships

Klarman Fellows pursue research in any discipline in the College, including natural sciences, social sciences, humanities and the creative arts as well as cross-disciplinary fields. The application deadline is October 14.
Charles "Chip" Aquadro

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Aquadro honored for contributions to population genetics

A world leader in the study of population genetics of the fruit fly, Aquadro studies the amount of diversity that exists within and between the genomes of organisms.
Geoffrey Coates

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Coates wins 2022 Eni Award for environmental solutions in chemistry

An international honor recognizes Prof. Geoffrey Coates for innovations in sustainable plastics.
entomology lab

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Study identifies 'transformative learning experiences’ of field courses

While many scientists say field courses shaped their careers and benefit their students, few studies quantify their effects. Cornell researchers want to change that.
book cover

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Book views virtual, real world through a new media artist’s eyes

In a new book, Prof. Timothy Murray illuminates technological improvisation at the intersection of art and politics.
Book cover: The Zelensky Method

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‘The Zelensky Method’ unpacks Ukrainian president’s panache

In an extended essay, Grant Farred focuses on actor-turned-wartime president, examining the intersection of pop culture and politics.
Book cover: The Downfall of the American Order

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Is American influence waning? Book considers what comes next

The collection, “The Downfall of the American Order?” explores global affairs at this moment in history, a turning point in American influence.
Two people hold a laptop-sized piece of equipment

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$3.8M NSF grant begins a new era of early universe research

The grant from the National Science Foundation will support a team of Cornell physicists who smash matter into its component parts to learn about elementary particles and their interactions.
Poster: Communicating Mathematics

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Talking numbers: Cornell hosts math communication workshop

August 8-11, mathematics researchers and college-level teachers will discuss what it takes to communicate effectively among mathematicians, to students, and to the public.
Person writing on a chalkboard

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Klarman Fellow achieves ‘beautiful results’ with outstanding math problems

Christian Gaetz uses his specific focus in mathematics – algebraic combinatorics – to make exciting progress on open problems.
Person holds baby up in the air

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Babies learn power of voice through experimentation

Cornell researchers have found that babies learn their prelinguistic vocalizations – coos, grunts and vowel sounds – change the behaviors of other people, a key building block of communication.
Book cover: Medicine in the Talmud

Article

Ancient Jewish text preserves real-world remedies

The Babylonian Talmud, a collection of rabbinic writings produced in ancient Persia, contains a great deal of medical knowledge, according to a recent book by the new director of the Jewish Studies Program.
Five clusters of bright orange light surrounding one cluster of dimmer magenta light

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Harnessing machine learning to analyze quantum material

Prof. Eun-Ah Kim's research, using a machine learning technique developed with Cornell computer scientists, sets the stage for insights into new phases of matter.
Colorful painting of cartoonish hills, animals, buildings and people

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New book documents lives of unaccompanied minors

For six years, Klarman Fellow Chaira Galli helped youths from Central America navigate the United States’ labyrinthine asylum process while doing an ethnographic study.
Oil painting of a person in robes at a desk, holding a flaming heart

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Klarman Fellow traces ideas of slavery from ancient Rome to upstate NY

Toni Alimi’s book project, “Slaves of God,” delves deep into the Augustine cannon, explaining the philosopher’s reasons for justifying slavery.
Person staning inside a room with a book shelf

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Michael Koch, Epoch editor, remembered for ‘quiet grace’

Koch’s expertise made a mark on American literature and influenced writers who went on to publish bestselling and prize-winning works of fiction and poetry.
Song Lin

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Song Lin wins EPA Green Chemistry Challenge award

Lin's new process uses readily available substances and inexpensive electrodes to create the large and complicated molecules widely used in the pharmaceutical industry.
woman outside

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Mong fellowship advances neuroimaging collaboration

Their work could have future implications for human health, setting a path for research into understanding brain function.
Two people stand near a poster listing awards

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Arts and Sciences faculty honored for teaching, advising excellence

"These faculty members and graduate teaching assistants have made tremendous contributions for the benefit of our students, guiding their educational paths and molding their experiences."
transparent sea creature with six tentacles

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Jellyfish’s stinging cells hold clues to biodiversity

Biologist Leslie Babonis studied sea anemones to understand how a neuron could be reprogrammed to make a new cell.
Large pink blooms foreground a bell tower

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New Frontier Grants push boundaries in A&S research

The College has awarded seven New Frontier Grants totaling $1.25 million to faculty members pursuing critical developments in areas across sciences and humanities.
Historical black and white photo of a military band

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Victorian medicine shaped modern concepts of race

Medical statistics compiled and published by the British military played an important role in introducing “race” as a categorical reality, Suman Seth argues.
Microchip embedded in computer hardware

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Early Silicon Valley championed meritocracy through ‘flexible masculinity’

Klarman Fellow Charles Petersen won the Martha Moore Trescott Prize at the 2022 Business History Conference for his gender analysis of tech company leadership.
Animal Behavior Podcast logo

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Frog song, shrimp and evolution: Animal Behavior Podcast launches Season 2

Klarman Fellow and animal behavior researcher Matthew Zipple started the podcast to share the vast array of animal behaviors.
Person carries a heavy cement block around a wall

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Klarman Fellow Nancy P. Lin interprets urban on-site art

Focusing on Chinese contemporary art, Lin brings her fascination with urban spaces to her work as an art historian.
John Martinis

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Quantum computing pioneer to share insights in Bethe lectures

On April 27, physicist John Martinis will explain the basic concepts behind quantum computing for a general audience.
A huge pile of white styrofoam shipping boxes jumbled together.

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Light, oxygen turn waste plastics into useful benzoic acid

The new reaction can even take place in a sunny window, as the researchers demonstrated in their experiments.
Alejandro Martínez-Marquina

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Klarman fellow questions common financial decisions

Behavioral and experimental economist Alejandro Martínez-Marquina wants to know the mechanisms through which people make choices about money, especially when debt or uncertainty are present.
Several small, striped fish against a dark background

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Rational neural network advances machine-human discovery

This machine-human partnership is a step toward the day when artificially intelligent deep learning will enhance scientific exploration of natural phenomena such as weather systems, climate change, fluid dynamics, genetics and more.
Five people working on laptops at a long table

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Women want to work, despite workforce precarity

Despite persistent gaps in workforce participation, when it comes to wanting to work, the gender gap has all but disappeared over the last 45 years, according to Cornell sociologist Landon Schnabel.
graphic showing a hydrogen fuel cell

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Carbon-coated nickel enables fuel cell free of precious metals

The new discovery could accelerate the widespread use of hydrogen fuel cells, which hold great promise as efficient, clean energy sources for vehicles and other applications.
The Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX)

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Chasing data: Astronomers race to explore ancient galaxies

At a dizzying elevation in Chile, two astronomers had only hours left to collect data from light that had taken 11.5 billion years to reach Earth.
Book cover: I'm a Neutrino

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Meet the neutrinos: Kids’ book introduces mystery particles

Physics researcher Eve Vavagiakis published “I’m a Neutrino: Tiny Particles in a Big Universe,” a picture book introducing children (and adults) to tiny particles that have an outsized effect on the universe.
Person wearing black holds out an elaborate pink shape

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Klarman Fellow blends physics and math to explore string theory

Richard Nally will spend his three-year fellowship seeking to understand the mathematical structures at the root of gravity and quantum mechanics.
Two pink and blue figures side by side

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Magnetism helps electrons vanish in high-temp superconductors

Cornell physicist’s discovery could lead to the engineering of high-temp superconducting properties into materials useful for quantum computing, medical imaging.
Book cover: Revolution, An Intellectual History

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New history of revolution offers hope for “our troubled present”

Enzo Traverso's research reinterprets the history of 19th and 20th century revolutions through a constellation of images, from Marx’s ‘locomotives of history’ to Lenin’s mummified body to the Paris Commune’s demolition of the Vendome Column.
People in a town square hold hands in a large circle

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People rethink nationalist beliefs in uncertain times

Based on an in-depth study of ordinary people in Russia, new research explores how citizens engage with the principles of nationalism in making sense of disruptive social change.
Campus buildings, cloudy sky, lake

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Six A&S professors named 2022 Simons fellows

"These outstanding physicists and mathematicians are pushing the boundaries of our understanding," said Ray Jayawardhana, the Harold Tanner Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences.
Book cover: The End of Pax Americana

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Book describes dislocation of ‘the West’

In his new book, Prof. Naoki Sakai examines a new order taking place that dislocates America and Europe from the center of world power.
Book cover: Free Will

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Book explores free will and determinism

Cambridge University Press called upon Prof. Derk Pereboom to write a definitive overview of research on the free will debate.
Person wearing protective lab gear handles virus test samples

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Economist helps solve COVID-19 missing data problems

Professor of economics Jörg Stoye proposes new methods of deriving the prevalence of a disease when only partial data is available — with applications for epidemiology and public health policy.
Glass building; tree-lined street

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A&S announces third cohort of Klarman Fellows

Seven exceptional early-career scholars will be awarded three-year fellowships to pursue independent research in the arts and humanities, social sciences and natural sciences.
Book cover: Naked Agency

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Naminata Diabate wins ASA book prize for ‘Naked Agency’

“It is my hope that ‘Naked Agency’ will reframe the terms of the conversation on defiant disrobing by inviting readers to take seriously the circulation of women’s grievances and hopes and the (mis)use of their bodies’ images in our hyper-visual world.”
Amalia Skilton

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Klarman Fellow Skilton studies language development across cultures

During a three-year Klarman Postdoctoral Fellowship, Amalia Skilton will study joint attention behaviors – which include pointing – by doing field work in Peru's Amazon basin.
Book cover: Street Sounds

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Fahmy wins Urban History Association book prize

Ziad Fahmy won a 2021 book prize from the Urban History Association (UHA) for “Street Sounds: Listening to Everyday Life in Modern Egypt." Fahmy’s book was recognized for Best Book in Non-North American Urban History.
Illustration of two black holes

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Binary black hole spin behavior revealed using novel techniques

Research done at Cornell has uncovered the first potential signs of spin-orbit resonances in binary black holes, a step toward understanding the mechanisms of supernovas and other big questions in astrophysics.
Historical black and white photo of a large waterfall

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Indigenous-Cornell partnership publishes Gayogo̱hó꞉nǫɁ history

The Tompkins County Historical Commission will release a short book written by Cornell Professor Kurt Jordan with the help of Gayogo̱hó꞉nǫɁ community members, titled “The Gayogo̱hó꞉nǫɁ People in the Cayuga Lake Region: A Brief History.”
Illustration of nSWAT mechanism stretching DNA molecules

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‘Lab on a chip’ can measure protein-DNA interactions

New nanophotonic tweezers developed by Cornell researchers can stretch and unzip DNA molecules as well as disrupt and map protein-DNA interactions, paving the way for commercial availability.
Watercolor painting of a coastline with a sail boat

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Watercolor views advanced the British empire

Watercolor 'views' of enemy coastline, commissioned by the eighteenth century British Royal Navy, are both art and navigational tool, writes Kelly Presutti.
Robert Strichartz

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Robert Strichartz, math analyst, dies at 78

Robert Strichartz, professor of mathematics in the College of Arts and Sciences, died on December 19 after a long illness. He was 78.
Book cover: Veronica Franco in Dialogue

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Marilyn Migiel wins MLA prize for book on ‘proto-feminist’ poet

Marilyn Migiel, professor of Romance studies, has won the Modern Language Association’s Aldo and Jeanne Scaglione Publication Award for “Veronica Franco in Dialogue,” forthcoming from the University of Toronto Press in spring 2022.
people in tents

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Schmidt: Exploring Earth’s oceans to reach Europa

Britney Schmidt is in Antarctica through February 2022 with a small team of researchers to explore the confluence of glaciers, floating ice shelves and ocean, using a submarine robot called Icefin.
Eun-Ah Kim at whiteboard

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Grant funds machine learning discovery in quantum physics

Physicist Eun-Ah Kim and collaborators are leading the way in the discovery of new quantum materials and the development of quantum computing.
Wind turbines in a green, hilly landscape

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Wilson wins grant to explore rare earth element opportunities

Justin Wilson has received a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy to develop more efficient methods of separating rare earth elements, which are found in wind turbines, liquid crystal displays, batteries, and portable electronics.
Ancient stone building in a rocky landscape, seen from above
Provided The 7th-century Armenian church of Vankasar in Azerbaijan. In April, Caucasus Heritage Watch reported a possible threat to the church due to satellite detection of heavy machinery in the area.

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Satellite monitoring documents cultural heritage at risk

Cornell researchers are using satellite imagery to protect endangered and damaged cultural heritage in the South Caucasus, where an ethnic conflict between Armenia and Azerbaijan has raged for decades.
Valzhyna Mort

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A&S poet wins 2021 Griffin Poetry Prize

Valzhyna Mort, assistant professor of literatures in English, won the 2021 Griffin Poetry Prize in the international category for her 2020 book, “Music for the Dead and Resurrected.”
Porcelain plate painted with a landscape
The Metropolitan Museum of Art Collection A porcelain plate in the "Service des Departments" series by Sèvres

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A fragmented France depicted on dessert plates

In a new essay, Kelly Presutti describes the ultimate failure of a set of Sèvres porcelain dessert plates, 1824-32, to represent all of France.
Kaushik Basu

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Kaushik Basu receives Humboldt Research Award

Basu plans to use the Humboldt Research Award for economics to work on moral philosophy and game theory, and on law and economics.
Francesco Sgarlata

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Klarman postdoc tackles ‘theory of everything’ with first principles

Physicist Francesco Sgarlata is taking a bottom-up approach to finding a theory of quantum gravity.
Crowd of people holding signs

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Reunion panel steers racism conversation toward action

The panel suggested listening to scholarly experts, implementing new initiatives and engaging students and faculty in organizations beyond the university.
Liz Kellogg

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Pew scholar builds on gene-editing technology

Elizabeth Kellogg, assistant professor of molecular biology and genetics in the College of Arts and Sciences, has been named to the Pew Scholars Program to pursue research into advancing gene editing capability.
Person serving a piece of pie
Jason Koski/Cornell University Michael Stillman enjoys some pie during a Pi Day celebration, 2015

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Stillman receives UI achievement award for mathematics

A 2021 Outstanding Achievement Award from the University of Illinois Department of Mathematics recognizes advances in the field by Michael Stillman, professor of mathematics.
University campus seen from above, sunny day

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New impact grants expand humanities research

The Society for the Humanities added to its grant offerings in 2021, awarding Humanities Impact Grants to humanities projects that “engage in broader public conversations with social impact in mind.”
Stack of books

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New A&S faculty bring Indigenous studies expertise

Two new faculty members who specialize in Native American and Indigenous literatures will join the Department of Literatures in English for the fall of 2021.
Scott Emr

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Emr wins $1.2M Shaw Prize in Life Science and Medicine

Scott Emr's landmark discoveries focus on complexes that are central to life, health and disease.
Antique postcard featuring a smiling woman
One object in the digital archive connected to the online game “Found in the Archive” is a Spanish postcard advertising a play from 1909, containing text that, characteristic of the time and genre, discriminates against disabled men.

Article

Online game replicates frustrations of research and disability

With a grant from the Society for the Humanities, Julia Chang has developed an online game with an undergrad computer science researcher, based on her research on disability in modern Spain. The game will launch during an online event June 2 at 2 p.m.
Baobao Zhang

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Klarman Fellow Zhang named CIFAR Azrieli Global Scholar

As a CIFAR Azrieli Global Scholar, Baobao Zhang, Klarman Postdoctoral Fellow in government, will investigate challenges governments face when addressing public perceptions of inequalities brought about by new technologies.
Illustration of building silhouettes

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$2M in New Frontier Grants boost high-impact A&S research

… of human experience on the Underground Railroad.” Tristan Lambert , professor of chemistry and chemical biology, will … reaction to react with, and thus trap, carbon dioxide,” Lambert said. “If successful, this research could lead to new …
colorful illustration featuring ghosts
Ghost Graffiti by Andrea Dezsö

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Society for the Humanities 'Afterlives' theme draws record interest

During 2020, Cornell’s Society for the Humanities chose “Afterlives” as its theme for 2021-22. Scholars from all over the world and all around the College of Arts and Sciences responded to the call, resulting in a record number of applications for the Society’s fellowships.