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Book cover: Iberian Moorings

Article

‘Iberian Moorings’ compares Muslim and Jewish golden ages

In his new book “Iberian Moorings,” professor Ross Brann compares the histories of the Jewish and Muslim traditions in the Iberian Peninsula between the tenth and thirteenth centuries, tracing how Islamic al-Andalus and Jewish Sefarad were invested with special political, cultural and historical significance across the Middle Ages.
Dark space, interrupted by two black holes
Aurore Simonnet/LIGO-Caltech-MIT-Sonoma State An artist’s conception shows two merging black holes similar to those detected by LIGO.

Article

Black hole spin finding could shed light on relativity, stars

Klarman Fellow Vijay Varma applied a new method of studying binary black holes to analyze data gathered by the LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave detectors.
City buildings

Article

Panel: Pandemic and protests laid economic injustices bare

Four faculty members and a Washington Post reporter discussed the ways racism shapes economic policies, and how economic policies shape inequality in America – historically and today.
Book cover: Rational Rules

Article

‘Rational Rules’ book examines how we learn morals

In his new book, “Rational Rules: Towards a Theory of Moral Learning,” philosophy professor Shaun Nichols argues that we can explain many of the features of moral systems and how humans form them in terms of rational learning from evidence.
Person writing in a notebook

Article

Time and sanctuary: Writing program shapes promising voices

Cornell’s Creative Writing Program gives promising fiction writers and poets the time, space and mentoring they need to find their voices, develop their art and produce important work at a time when the world needs insight from artistic voices.
Interior of a self-driving car, looking out at palm trees

Article

Event examines the ethics, politics and future of AI

Three leading Cornell scholars discussed governmental, social and moral ramifications of artificial intelligence in “Politics, Policy & Ethics of the Coming AI Revolution” on April 15, an Arts Unplugged event sponsored by the College of Arts and Sciences and moderated by Andrew Ross Sorkin ’99, of CNBC and The New York Times.
Book cover: Githa Sowerby, Three Plays

Article

Githa Sowerby study illuminates women writers' struggle

In a new critical edition of three plays by Githa Sowerby (1876-1970) J. Ellen Gainor argues for the lasting merit of this writer's artistry and for recognition of women in theater.
Book cover: Emancipation's Daughters

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‘Emancipation’s Daughters’ celebrates five iconic Black women

In her new book, Riché Richardson examines iconic Black women leaders who have contested racial stereotypes and constructed new national narratives of Black womanhood in the United States.
Book cover: Subdivision

Article

Lennon publishes doubleheader of new fantastical fiction

J. Robert Lennon, who teaches fiction in Cornell’s Creative Writing Program, published two new books on April 6: “Subdivision,” a fantastical novel about memory and trauma; and “Let me Think,” 71 short stories collected from years of observing and chronicling the American absurd in fiction.
Silhouette of person kneeling by a pond

Article

Religion follows patterns of politicization during COVID-19

To find the impact of religion during the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States, Landon Schnabel, the Robert and Ann Rosenthal Assistant Professor of Sociology in the College of Arts and Sciences, analyzed responses from 11,537 Americans surveyed March 19-24, 2020, shortly after the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a global health pandemic.
William J. Kennedy

Article

Kennedy recognized by Renaissance Society of America

The Renaissance Society of America has given William J. Kennedy its Paul Oskar Kristeller Lifetime Achievement Award, honoring “a lifetime of uncompromising devotion to the highest standard of scholarship accompanied by exceptional achievement in Renaissance studies.”
James Walsh

Article

Klarman fellow bridges divide between math and philosophy

Working in the field of logic, James Walsh, a Klarman Postdoctoral Fellow in philosophy, studies the axiomatic method, a central methodology in mathematics whereby claims are proven from axioms.
Person holding a baby close

Article

Faculty examine racism ‘embedded’ in US health care

During the “Racism in America: Health” webinar on March 29, four Cornell faculty members elaborated on ways the COVID-19 pandemic has exposed race-based discrepancies in health care and health outcomes under the American health care system.
Book cover: Feral Ornamentals

Article

‘Playful uncertainty’ apparent in new poetry by Charlie Green

In “Feral Ornamentals,” Literatures in English senior lecturer Charlie Green finds whimsy in uncertainty and humor in the “terrifying,” creating new poems with a fact-based look at the natural world and a sense of exploration through process.
Salah Hassan

Article

Hassan honored for elevating the study of global modern art

Salah Hassan, Distinguished Professor of Arts and Sciences in Africana Studies, has been elected as the 2021 Distinguished Scholar by the College Art Association for his scholarship and curatorial work, which have been deeply formative in bringing recognition to the study of modern and contemporary African and African diaspora art.
Samantha Trumbo

Article

Astronomy to host 51 Pegasi b Fellow Samantha Trumbo ’13

As a 51 Pegasi b Fellow hosted by the astronomy department, Samantha Trumbo ’13, a doctoral student in planetary science at the California Institute of Technology, will follow up on her breakthrough research on Europa and other of Jupiter's moons.
Yehonathan Indursky

Article

Director of Netflix hit “Shtisel” highlights Jewish Studies event

Yehonathan Indursky, director and writer of Netflix hit “Shtisel,” will talk about the series during an online event hosted by Cornell’s Jewish Studies Program on March 24.
Barbara Baird

Article

Baird honored among Distinguished Women in Chemistry, 2021

Barbara Baird, the Horace White Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biology in the College of Arts and Sciences, has been honored as one of the 2021 Distinguished Women in Chemistry or Chemical Engineering by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry.
cell tissue magnified in bright red and blue
Tissue slice of mouse melanoma, with all cells labeled in blue and cancer cells labeled in red by immunofluorescence

Article

Baskin lab identifies pathway for treating deadly melanomas

Baskin said he is excited about this potential pathway for treating melanoma, which is dangerous because of its ability to spread from skin to other tissues.
Three students in the back of a classroom

Article

Latinos, Blacks less swayed by college-bound friends

In new research, Steven Alvarado reports that having college-bound friends increases the likelihood that a student will enroll in college. However, the effect of having college-bound friends is diminished for Black and Latino students compared with white and Asian students, especially for males and especially for selective and highly selective colleges, due to structural and cultural processes.
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