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Person in lab coat holding a glass bottle

Article

In search for alien life, purple may be the new green

Purple bacteria is one of the primary contenders for life that could dominate a variety of Earth-like planets orbiting different stars, and would produce a distinctive "light fingerprint," Cornell scientists report.
Person in military fatigues addresses others

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5K run, remembrances to honor fallen Cornell war hero

On April 13, the Navy Reserve Officers' Training Corps will celebrate the legacy of U.S. Marine Maj. Richard J. Gannon II '95, nearly 20 years after he was killed in Iraq.
hundreds of workers wearing red caps bend over long tables, rolling cigarettes

Article

Why kretek – ‘no ordinary cigarette’ – thrives in Indonesia

In a new book, anthropologist Marina Welker examines the staggering success of clove-laced tobacco cigarettes called “kretek” in Indonesia, the world’s second-largest cigarette market.
Metal machine with wheels on a rocky landscape

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Mars Sample Return a top scientific priority, Lunine testifies

Samples of Martian rock and soil could be stranded if Congress doesn't adequately fund a NASA mission to retrieve them, Astronomy Chair Jonathan Lunine told a U.S. House subcommittee on March 21.
The frozen ocean world of Enceladus, a moon of Saturn.

Article

Ice shell thickness reveals water temp on ocean worlds

Decades before any probe dips a toe – and thermometer – into the waters of distant ocean worlds, Cornell astrobiologists have devised a way to determine ocean temperatures based on the thickness of their ice shells, effectively conducting oceanography from space.
Two people leaning back to back against a wall, shadowed

Article

For couples, negative speaks louder than positive

People with stronger negative implicit judgments about a partner are more likely to perceive negativity in daily interactions with them, which hurts relationship satisfaction over time, Cornell psychology research finds.
Outline of a brain in colorful lines against a black background

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Mouse social calls and distress calls linked to different neurons

“Vocal communication is central to our experience as humans and fundamental to social success for animals generally,” said Prof. Katherine Tschida.
Sign showing Populism going one way and democracy the other

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Democratic decline a global phenomenon, even in wealthy nations

Democratic backsliding is occurring in an unprecedented number of wealthy countries once thought immune to such forces – the United States among them, finds a new analysis led by Cornell political scientists.
Jamila Michener

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Poverty is a political choice, Michener tells NYS Senate

On Dec. 12, Jamila Michener offered expert testimony during a New York State Senate committee hearing focused on the causes and effects of poverty in the state’s small and midsized cities.
Person pointing to a brightly lit, colorful computer schreen

Article

With unprecedented flares, stellar corpse shows signs of life

The bright, brief flashes – as short as a few minutes in duration, and as powerful as the original explosion 100 days later – appeared in the aftermath of a rare type of stellar cataclysm.
Illustration of a tree, a dinosaur and a bird

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Jurassic worlds might be easier to spot than modern Earth

Telescopes could better detect potential chemical signatures of life in the atmosphere of an Earth-like exoplanet more closely resembling the age the dinosaurs inhabited than the one we know today, Cornell astronomers find.
Orange tube-like machine covered with lice

Article

Underwater robot updates understanding of ice shelf crevasses

Crevasses play an important role in circulating seawater beneath Antarctic ice shelves, potentially influencing their stability, finds Cornell-led research based on first-of-its-kind exploration by an underwater robot.
tiny island sprouting palm trees and a few buildings

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From bottom up, bureaucrats elevate climate change as priority

Climate has gained priority, driven by bureaucrats who learn about its importance in highly vulnerable countries and then spread that knowledge.
illustration of gravitaional waves

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After 15 years, gravitational waves detected as cosmic ‘hum’

A 15-year collaboration in which Cornell astrophysicists have played leading roles has found the first evidence of gravitational waves slowly undulating through the galaxy.
Black and white image of two people sitting on a bench, seen from behind

Article

Spouses sharing friends may live longer after widowhood

New Cornell sociology research: The “widowhood effect” – the tendency for married people to die in close succession – is accelerated when spouses don’t know each other’s friends well.
Illustration of three planets side-by-side

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Exoplanet may reveal secrets about the edge of habitability

A recently discovered exoplanet may be key to solving how close a rocky planet can be to a star, and still sustain water and life.
Digital image of purple building-like shapes emerging from a blue floor

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Kreps: Generative AI holds promise, peril for democracies

Popularized in 2022 by Open AI’s ChatGPT, generative artificial intelligence threatens to undermine trust in democracies when misused, but may also be harnessed for public good.
Bright pink circle shot through with blue against a black background

Article

Neutron star’s X-rays reveal ‘photon metamorphosis’

Scientists were surprised when a NASA satellite detected that lower- and higher-energy X-rays were polarized differently, with electromagnetic fields oriented at right angles to each other.
 Kristina Hugar, Ph.D. ‘15, Ecolectro’s chief science officer, conducts research in the startup’s laboratory space at Cornell’s McGovern Center.

Article

Integrating STEM majors won’t end gender segregation at work

Only 36% of the gender segregation seen among college-educated workers is tied to their undergraduate degrees, a new study finds.
Happy face drawn on pavement

Article

Circumstances influence happiness as much as personality

Surveys of happiness and life satisfaction overstate the importance of psychological traits, but a methodological change – simply asking someone how they’re doing – enables a fairer comparison.
TV screen, socked feet on a coffee table

Article

‘Cheap thrills’: Low-cost leisure leads to less work, more play

Researchers found that people today work substantially less than they did generations ago because of virtually unlimited cheap entertainment increasingly at their fingertips.
Person speaks to an audience in a room lighted blue

Article

Remember me? Gender, race may make you forgettable

Economist Michèle Belot says that systemic biases in the way we remember people could influence social networks important to career advancement.
Darryl Seligman

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First known interstellar interloper resembles ‘dark comet’

Insights from Oumuamua could advance our understanding of planet formation in this solar system and others.
Red circle with blue light at the end and two threads leading down

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Robot provides unprecedented views below Antarctic ice shelf

A U.S.-New Zealand research team recognized a shift as evidence of “ice pumping” – a process important to the stability of the Ross Ice Shelf.
A disc of stars in space

Article

Astronomers discover metal-rich galaxies in early universe

Cornell astronomers discovered a companion galaxy estimated at 1.4 billion years old while scanning images from NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope.
Group of people in an equipment room, a table of parts

Article

Underwater robot helps explain Antarctic glacier’s retreat

First-of-their-kind observations beneath the floating shelf of a vulnerable Antarctic glacier reveal widespread cracks and crevasses where melting occurs more rapidly, contributing to the glacier’s retreat.
A-frame house in the forest

Article

Same-race reviews reduce inequality in Airbnb bookings

White guests favor Airbnb properties with white hosts, but are more inclined to rent from Black or Asian hosts if they see featured reviews from previous white guests, Cornell research finds.
Book cover: 'Bombing among friends"

Article

‘Bombing among friends’: Historian probes Allied raids on Italy

In WWII, two-thirds of the Italian civilian victims of Allied bombing were killed when Italy was no longer an enemy.
An auditorium with a large crowd celebrating a graduation

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December graduation celebrates unique paths to Cornell education

More than 700 students were awarded degrees at the university’s 20th recognition ceremony Dec. 18.
Six people stand in a group at the front of a classroom, conversing

Article

Breaking barriers: Peer outreach boosts student veterans

The number of undergraduate veterans enrolled at Cornell has nearly quadrupled over the past five years, thanks in part to outreach by a team of student veteran peer counselors.
 Peter Enns

Article

Cornell-led election survey seeks to improve science of polls

The survey boasts a sample size 20 times larger than most nationally representative surveys.
Red flag against a white sky

Article

People over numbers: Book charts China’s neopolitical turn

Jeremy Lee Wallace explains how a few numbers came to define Chinese politics “until they did not count what mattered and what they counted did not measure up,” and the “stunning about-face” led by Xi Jinping within the Chinese Communist Party.
book cover: Contemporary State Building

Article

How security crises can spur state-building in Latin America

Gustavo Flores-Macías analyzes key factors of public safety across Latin America in his new book.
Two people stand in front of a pond surrounded by woods

Article

Outreach supports Black rural landowners in Northeast

Supported by a grant from the College of Arts and Sciences' Rural Humanities initiative through an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation award, a 30-page publication highlights the stories of five Black owners of forestland in Massachusetts, New York, New Hampshire and Vermont
Two people smile, discovering a piece of scientific equipment

Article

Academic boot camp boosts veterans’ higher ed mission

Professors in physics and classics contributed to the Warrior-Scholar Project (WSP) hosted at Cornell for military veterans July 23 to Aug. 6.
metal sculpture of a figure blindfolded and holding scales

Article

Courts, not amendments, best route for constitutional reform

Since the mid-20th century, Congress has repurposed Article V of the U.S. Constitution from a tool for constitutional reform into a mechanism for taking positions on issues, according to research by David A. Bateman.
Book cover: Up from the Depths

Article

How Herman Melville can help us cope with dark times

Prof. Aaron Sachs’ new book tells the stories of two American writers, who he says show us how history can offer hope.
World map, color coded

Article

Self-fulfilling rankings boost agencies’ power, influence

Cornell researchers developed a theoretical model that suggests an explanation for ratings produced by firms like Standard & Poor’s, Moody’s and Fitch, or the World Bank.
Mother holding baby, leaning her forehead against the baby's forehead. Both are smiling.

Article

After ‘mama,’ children’s first words include ‘this’ and ‘that’

A new Cornell study by Klarman Fellow Amalia Skilton is the largest ever, by sample size, of early vocabulary development in an Indigenous language.
People stand in a half circle in a sunny outdoor plaza

Article

Experts: Ukraine war puts world in ‘uncharted territory’

Clarity about the goals of sanctions against Russia will be key to attempts to de-escalate the conflict, Cornell faculty experts said during a March 4 panel discussion.
Apartment building on a gloomy street

Article

Tenant groups build power in marginalized communities

Scholars have overlooked tenant organizations as a crucial source of political power in the most precarious communities, according to new research co-authored by Jamila Michener.
Book cover: The Language Game

Article

Why language is like charades – and could save us from AI

Language emerges from a continual flow of creative improvisation, not biologically evolved genes or instincts, argue authors of a new book.
Child drinking water from a glass

Article

Water crisis increased Flint children’s lead exposure

As many as one in four children in Flint, Michigan – far above the national average – may have experienced elevated blood lead levels after the city’s 2014 water crisis, finds new research by Jerel Ezell, assistant professor in the Africana Studies and Research Center.
Person walking past a wall painted with many faces

Article

Fear of majority-minority changes perceptions of race

The threat of demographic change may alter who white Americans perceive as racial minorities, potentially making more people vulnerable to discrimination, suggests new Cornell psychology research.
book cover

Article

How to transform neighborhoods without destroying them

"In the wealthiest country on earth, can it possibly be that low-income residents only get to live in wretched places?"
Maserati in front of elaborate house with fountain and sculpture in courtyard

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Lavish wealth tolerated more for individuals than groups

Driving the effect, the researchers propose, is our tendency to see internal traits as more responsible for individual successes and failures than for group outcomes.
 Goldwin Smith Hall

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Weiss teaching awards honor 10 exceptional faculty

Three A&S faculty members have been selected to receive Stephen H. Weiss Awards honoring excellence in undergraduate teaching and mentoring, President Martha E. Pollack announced Oct. 18.
 New York City

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Center links economy and society to study changing world

The development of regional knowledge economies is one of several primary areas of research focus for the center’s Economic Sociology Lab, supported by graduate researchers and undergraduate assistants.
Dean Colleen Barry with microphone in hand, speaking at podiumSchool of Public Policy

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Decades in making, public policy school now a reality

The Cornell Jeb E. Brooks School of Public Policy creates a home for policy-oriented faculty to study and teach, and for students to learn, about effective, thoughtful policymaking, analysis and management.
Two mice perched on flowers and facing each other

Article

Lonely mice more vocal, more social after isolation

Female mice exhibit a strong drive to socialize with other females following periods of acute isolation.