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Martha Haynes with glasses, shoulder-length gray hair in a red top, with blurred stars on screen behind her

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‘Follow your dreams,’ writes astronomer Martha Haynes

“The Sky Is for Everyone” is a collection of autobiographical essays by “women who broke down barriers and changed the face of modern astronomy.”
Catherine “Cat” Ramirez Foss

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Recipients of inaugural undergraduate academic advising awards named

Catherine “Cat” Ramirez Foss, Advising Dean in the College of Arts and Sciences, receives one of the two awards, which recognize the critical work of front-line academic advisors.
Fernando Santiago

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Rochester lawyer receives NYS Hometown Alumni Award

Fernando Santiago ’86 was the first person in his family to go to college and majored in government in the College of Arts and Sciences.
Person crouching in a field, tinkering with a device near a fence

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Researchers consider invisible hurdles in digital ag design

Enabling farmers to tinker with their own systems and involving them early in the design process could better translate technology from the lab to the field.
Book cover: Adventure Capitalism

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Think twice before founding that free-market utopia

In a new book, Raymond Craib writes that libertarian attempts to escape regulation and build communities structured entirely through market transactions often have calamitous consequences for local populations.
Book cover: Medicine in the Talmud

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Ancient Jewish text preserves real-world remedies

A collection of rabbinic writings produced by Jews living in ancient Persia, contains a great deal of medical knowledge, according to a new book by the new director of the Jewish Studies Program.
Riché Richardson

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Juneteenth marks emancipation’s progress and delay

The holiday reminds professor Riché Richardson of exciting celebrations of her youth, but also of obstacles that stand in the way of fully achieving Black freedom.
Alison Lurie

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Pulitzer Prize winner Alison Lurie to be celebrated in July 1 memorial

The service and reception honoring the acclaimed writer's life and work are open to the public.
Book cover: Up from the Depths

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How Herman Melville can help us cope with dark times

Aaron Sachs’ new book, “Up from the Depths: Herman Melville, Lewis Mumford, and Rediscovery in Dark Times,” tells the interconnected stories of two important American writers, arguing that they show us how history can offer hope.
Five clusters of bright orange light surrounding one cluster of dimmer magenta light

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Harnessing machine learning to analyze quantum material

Eun-Ah Kim used a machine learning technique developed with Cornell computer scientists to analyze massive amounts of data from a quantum metal, setting the stage for future machine learning aided insight into new phases of mater.
Giant white dish-shaped structure set in lush hills

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Rapid-fire fast radio burst shows hot space between galaxies

Sending out an occasional and informative cosmic ping from more than 3.5 billion light years away, these quick-fire surges provide a pathway for scientists to comprehend the perplexing, mysterious and million-degree intergalactic medium.
Oil painting of a person in robes at a desk, holding a flaming heart

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Klarman Fellow traces ideas of slavery from ancient Rome to upstate NY

Toni Alimi’s book project, “Slaves of God,” delves deep into the Augustine cannon, explaining the philosopher’s reasons for justifying slavery.
Person staning inside a room with a book shelf

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Michael Koch, Epoch editor, remembered for ‘quiet grace’

Koch’s expertise made a mark on American literature and influenced writers who went on to publish bestselling and prize-winning works of fiction and poetry.
Song Lin

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Song Lin wins EPA Green Chemistry Challenge award

Lin's new process uses readily available substances and inexpensive electrodes to create the large and complicated molecules widely used in the pharmaceutical industry.
Barn-like building with open doors, lit within

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Tear down academic silos: Take an ‘undisciplinary’ approach

A new Cornell study suggests that solving societal problems such as climate change could require dismantling rigid academic boundaries, so that researchers from varying disciplines could work together collaboratively.
Three people in a sunny room with yellow walls

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Student films document Cornell’s LGBTQ history

Short documentaries created by the class, which draws students from all of Cornell’s schools and colleges, celebrate the 30th anniversary of Cornell’s LGBT Studies Program.
J Nation blowing on an instrument made out of long white pipes, with a yellow balloon attached

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Instrument-building festival challenges, inspires

Hosted by the Cornell ReSounds Project, the FutureSounds Festival featured guest builders and performers as well as newly designed instruments and compositions by Cornell students.
The three researchers are sitting around a desk and Ailong Ke is pointing to an image of the IscB molecule on the computer screen.

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Discovery offers starting point for better gene-editing tools

“Transposons are specialized genetic hitchhikers, integrating into and splicing out of our genomes all the time...by defining these enzymes in high resolution, we can tap into their powers.”
 Ray Jayawardhana

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Jayawardhana reappointed A&S dean, named Bethe professor

“Dean Jayawardhana has been an exceptional leader of the university’s most academically diverse college,” Provost Michael Kotlikoff said.
woman at waterfall

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Cornell celebrates bumper crop of Fulbright students

Seven 2021 graduates and recent Cornell alumni accepted Fulbright U.S. Student awards to research, study or teach English during the 2021-22 academic year, 15 were chosen for 2022-23.
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