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Media source: Cornell Chronicle

Double helix strands made out of tiny blue beads against a dark blue background

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CRISPR insight: How to fine-tune the Cas protein’s grip on DNA

A new explanation of nanoscale mechanics by Michelle Wang's lab contributes to the future of CRISPR technology.
abstract pattern featuring green dots in neat rows, intersected by orange lines

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Physicist identifies how electron crystals melt

Eun-Ah Kim and Michael Matty, M.S. ’19, Ph.D. ’22, describe a phase in between the liquid and the solid for electron structures.
A black and white image of Tom Davis in suit and tie, wearing black plastic glasses and smiling.

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Economist Tom Davis dies at 93

Tom E. Davis, professor emeritus of economics, was an expert on economic development in Latin America.
three women with tote bags

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Laidlaw scholars at Cornell gain global perspectives

Four current Laidlaw scholars share their summer research or leadership in action experiences.
man speaking

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Cornell, global partners discuss the next ‘grand challenge’

Global Cornell will host a town hall in December for additional feedback and announce the new Global Grand Challenge theme in the coming year.
someone holding vegetables

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Town-gown awards honor food-related community partnerships

The awards celebrate cooperation between the university and the greater Ithaca community.
A star shining brightly onto the red surface of a planet.

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Webb telescope shows exoplanet atmosphere as never seen before

“This is the first time we see concrete evidence of photochemistry – chemical reactions initialized by energetic stellar light – on exoplanets.”
Person speaking passionately into a microphone

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Anthology celebrates Nuyorican Poets Cafe founder

A digital and print collection, co-edited by Karen Jaime, pays tribute to the late Miguel Algarín.
A plate of Peruvian fried rice

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Goffe: Collaboration is key to major humanities grants

Grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Mellon Foundation will help make humanities research more accessible to scholars and the public.
Large aircraft without a cockpit parked on a runway at sunset

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Public views drone strikes with other countries’ support as most legitimate

A first-of-its kind survey reveals that Americans consider tactical strikes, used with the consent of other nations, to be the most morally legitimate or appropriate.
Two people wearing suits speak, seated on a stage among plants

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Iceland president: ‘Turn smallness into strength’

During a highlight of a two-day visit to Cornell, Guðni Th. Jóhannesson discussed his country’s commitment to peace, diversity and science-based climate solutions during a sold-out lecture held Nov. 10.
Six people stand in a group at the front of a classroom, conversing

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Breaking barriers: Peer outreach boosts student veterans

The number of undergraduate veterans enrolled at Cornell has nearly quadrupled over the past five years, thanks in part to outreach by a team of student veteran peer counselors.
A few dozen men sit and stand in a group, talking intensely

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‘Young, male and aimless’: Why are men in India delaying marriage?

Economic changes in India are forcing adaptations in traditional marriage practices, but not enough for a modernizing overhaul to this deeply traditional institution.
Book cover: Black Women's Rights

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Book: Time for Black women to claim the right to lead

Extending her research on writing by Black women around the world, Carole Boyce Davies examines the stories of Black women political leaders in Africa and in the global African Diaspora.
Jennifer Wissink

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Winter Session spotlight: Jennifer Wissink

Students can earn up to four credits in the three-week winter session – including Wissink's ECON 1110 Introductory Microeconomics course.
Peter Enns

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Cornell-led election survey seeks to improve science of polls

The survey boasts a sample size 20 times larger than most nationally representative surveys.
Headshots of three people

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Experts will offer day-after election analysis

The in-person event The Day After: What Happened on Election Night and What Happens Next will be held November 9 from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. in Martha Van Rensselaer Hall Room 155.
Three young people stand in a wood-paneled room

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Students get out the vote, on campus and across the state

“The youth have so much power, and we just don’t use it,” said Lauren Sherman ’24, Arts and Sciences student.
Horizontally-oriented abstract shapes in purple, green and black

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Common dietary fiber promotes allergy-like immune responses

Inulin, a type of dietary fiber commonly used in health supplements and known to have certain anti-inflammatory properties, can also promote an allergy-related type of inflammation in the lung and gut, and other parts of the body, according to a preclinical study from Cornell researchers.
Red flag against a white sky

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People over numbers: Book charts China’s neopolitical turn

Jeremy Lee Wallace explains how a few numbers came to define Chinese politics “until they did not count what mattered and what they counted did not measure up,” and the “stunning about-face” led by Xi Jinping within the Chinese Communist Party.
Eleven people pose on a staircase

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Cornell students to work at UN’s COP27 conference in Egypt

Eleven Cornell students, including two from Arts & Sciences, will help delegations from specialized agencies and small countries gain a stronger voice at the United Nations’ COP27 conference.
Person wearing a bright yellow jacket places a ticket on a car windshield

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Parking ticket reminders work, but not for all

New research by Cornell behavioral economists reveals that people who would benefit the most from gentle “nudges” to pay their fines – those who are least responsive to tickets in the first place – respond least to those reminders.
man in office

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Polarization research in Ecuador underscores risks to U.S. democracy

When political parties stoke partisan conflicts – often by contesting formal state institutions, like systems for managing elections – actual democratic capacity may take a hit as public opinion polarizes.
Stamps showing Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Toni Morrison

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Morrison, Ginsburg to be honored with U.S. postage stamps

Both Morrison and Ginsburg graduated from the College of Arts & Sciences.
Red wires on a black background

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Cornell joins Schmidt AI in Science postdoc research initiative

Cornell, including A&S, will recruit and train a cohort of up to 100 postdoctoral fellows in the fields of natural sciences and engineering. 
six women on steps of Goldwin Smith Hall

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Student group, Women of Color Athletics, creates space

A new group provides female athletes of color at Cornell with a community of women who understand their challenges.
Person speaking into a microphone

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eLab announces record cohort of student startups

Student founders from any field across Cornell may apply; once accepted, participants engage in entrepreneurship bootcamps, conduct customer discovery, refine their business plans and gain access to a network of successful Cornell alumni, all while earning college credit.
Goldwin Smith Hall in the fall

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Weiss teaching award honors eight exceptional faculty

Four A&S faculty members have been honored for their excellence in undergraduate teaching and mentoring.
Book cover: Blood Novels

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‘Blood Novels’ explores material, metaphor in Spanish realist fiction

Julia Chang examines the presence of blood and its deeper literary and cultural meaning in novels by three Spanish authors.
Person standing in a field, surrounded by green, yellow and red plants

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From fabric arts to human waste: Student Biennial projects transcend

More than a dozen students are taking part in the Cornell Biennial, which aims to serve as an anchor for the arts at Cornell.
book cover: Contemporary State Building

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How security crises can spur state-building in Latin America

Gustavo Flores-Macías analyzes key factors of public safety across Latin America in his new book.
Person wearing red and pearls, speaking at a podium

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Pollack lauds ‘amazing Cornellians’ in State of the University speech

Cornell's president highlighted recent achievements of Arts and Sciences faculty.
A few dozen people sit around a large square of tables in a room decorated with maps

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Global Cornell awards support new international courses

Five International Cornell Curriculum grants totaling $114,000 will support faculty developing courses that feature international experiences for students.
Looking down on a campus with buildings, green lawn, and a lake in the distance

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Staff changes will support interdisciplinary research

Julia Thom-Levy, professor of physics in the College of Arts and Sciences, has been named associate vice provost for physical sciences.
Two squares: on the left, large squares of black, purple and green. On the right, much higher resolution

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Lipid expansion microscopy uses the ‘power of click chemistry’

Cornell researchers have discovered a way to apply expansion microscopy, which expands cell components to make them more visible, to lipids using click chemistry, recognized with the 2022 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.
Book cover: Pandemic Politics

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Book: Partisanship led to disastrous response to COVID-19

Survey data shows how the Trump administration’s partisan response led ordinary citizens to prioritize what was good for their “team” rather than what was good for their country.
artist drawing of Jupiter's moon Europa

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Juno’s new views heighten Europa Clipper excitement

Scientists believe Europa’s global ocean contains more than twice as much water as all of Earth’s oceans combined and may be suitable for life.
Two people talking in a wooded setting

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‘Our story’: Native American writers cultivate their craft

Fourteen authors from upstate New York participating in the Oñgwaga•ä’ Writers Workshop this month.
Among several people in a tent, a woman in red traditional clothing faces three officials in white shirts and black trousers, sitting on a couch

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Creating ‘political economy of hope’ at Pakistan-India border

When politicians get close to constituents, either physically or digitally, they manage expectations and offer assurances to constituents. But they also expose themselves to scrutiny, giving people the chance to see beyond the performance into imperfect government workings.
Magnified image shows an arrow-shaped embryo, glowing red, yellow and purple at the edges, appearing to give off red smoke

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Cornell chemists contributed to Nobel Prize-winning work

Jeremy M. Baskin and Pamela Chang were doctoral students in Carolyn Bertozzi’s lab at the University of California, Berkley, in the mid-2000s.
Two people wearing gloves work with football-sized museum object

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Mummified bird gets second life in multisensory exhibition

“A Tale of Two Mummies: Multisensory Experience” runs Oct. 7-9, from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., in Upson Hall’s Lounge 116.
Two people stand in front of a pond surrounded by woods

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Outreach supports Black rural landowners in Northeast

Supported by a grant from the College of Arts and Sciences' Rural Humanities initiative through an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation award, a 30-page publication highlights the stories of five Black owners of forestland in Massachusetts, New York, New Hampshire and Vermont
Two-part illustration: on the left, a three-color wheel; on the right, an elongated tangle of blue, grey and purple threads

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Protein family shows how life adapted to oxygen

“By understanding the evolution of these proteins, we can understand how nature adapts to environmental changes at the molecular level. In turn, we also learn about our planet’s past.”
People sitting in a college classroom

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Active Learning Initiative, at 10, elevates teaching and belonging

The initiative has supported classes in the humanities, the social and natural sciences, mathematics, information science and engineering.
two women students outside in the snow

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Registration opens Oct. 17 for Winter Session Online

Enrollment is open to anyone interested in taking a class.
Thitirat Boonyanuphong

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Part-time study helps employees, visiting students boost careers

When Thitirat Boonyanuphong isn’t on her housekeeping rounds at the Statler Hotel or teaching conversational Thai at Cornell’s Language Resource Center, the 43-year-old can be found in a classroom on campus earning college credits.
Person lecturing at a podium

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Craib and Fiani win graduate, professional teaching prize

“These professors have demonstrated an extraordinary commitment to teaching and mentoring their students.”
Person standing in front of a small space craft

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Scientists depict Dragonfly landing site on Saturn moon Titan

When NASA’s 990-pound Dragonfly rotorcraft reaches Saturn’s moon in 2034, Cornell’s Léa Bonnefoy '15 will have helped to make it a smooth landing.
Book cover: State of Disaster

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Book: Policymakers are failing ‘climate refugees’

The United States must transform its outdated migration policies to address the human devastation that is left in the wake of climate change and environmental catastrophe, Maria Cristina Garcia argues.
Blazing yellow celestial body seen beyond the horizon of another globe, tinted red

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Synthetic lava in the lab aids exoplanet exploration

Cornell researchers developed a starter catalog for finding volcanic worlds that feature fiery landscapes and oceans of magma.
Person speaking authoritatively from a stage

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Panelists: War in Ukraine reshapes world political order

Faculty and journalist experts considered the consequences of the ongoing conflict during “Aftershocks: Geopolitics Since the Ukraine invasion."
Abstract blue, grey and black pattern

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Layering, not liquid: Astronomers explain Mars’ watery reflections

Using computer simulations, Cornell researchers demonstrate that strong reflections can be generated by interference between geological layers, without liquid water or other rare materials.
Illustration of a blocky silver robot

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Brains on board: Smart microrobots walk autonomously

Electronic “brains” on solar-powered robots that are smaller than an ant’s head allow them to walk by themselves.
Red cliffs reaching down to blue ocean; a city of white buildings appears small

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Statistical analysis aims to solve Greek volcano mystery

Sturt Manning has zeroed in on a much narrower range of dates, approximately 1609–1560 BCE, for the eruption on Santorini, a pivotal event in the prehistory of the region.
Medical professoional wearing a mask and protective gloves gives a shot to a person wearing a Cornell Big Red t-shirt

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Collaboration to infuse human behavior into epidemiological models

Six Cornell faculty members from three different colleges will work together to improve epidemiological models of infectious disease using a $1 million grant from the National Science Foundation.
2030 PROJECT LOGO

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From methane to microbes: 2030 Project conveys first grants

… vacuum – can be used to recover carbon dioxide.  Tristan Lambert , professor of chemistry and chemical biology (A&S), …
Desert land seen from above, showing a huge crater

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Student team will seek public’s views on planetary defense

The researchers will conduct public opinion surveys on how governments respond when asteroids and comets threaten cities, countries, or at the extreme, even the entire earth.
Ancient stone building with a spire and foliage growing on the roof

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Report shows near-total erasure of Armenian heritage sites

The study compiled decades of high-resolution satellite imagery from the Nakhchivan Autonomous Republic of Azerbaijan.
breast cancer cells

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Proteins could lead to early breast cancer diagnosis, treatment

A team of researchers has discovered a non-invasive biomarker that could aid with earlier diagnosis of breast cancer, the most common cancer among women, which will likely affect one in 13 women during their lives.
Sydney Shoemaker

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Sydney Shoemaker, leading figure of Cornell philosophy, dies at 90

Remembered as a powerful thinker and brilliant teacher, Shoemaker contributed to the outstanding reputation of Cornell philosophy during the second half of the twentieth century,
Hilary Beckles

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A.D. White Professors are named; fall visits announced

An acclaimed historian of the Caribbean and a multidisciplinary professor of the built environment have been appointed the newest A.D. White Professors-at-Large.
Khadija Monis

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Afghan students – now Cornellians – look to future

Nine Afghan undergraduates from Bangladesh-based Asian University for Women fled their country after the Taliban took control in August 2021, arriving in Ithaca four months later.
Person standing in front of a huge black & white image of a comet with a rocky surface

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Cornell scientists show how terrain evolves on an icy comet

Astronomers have shown how smooth terrains – a good place to land a spacecraft and to scoop up samples – evolve on the icy world of comets.
Luminescent tree-like structure with purple branches and bright green canopy: The lateral habenula in the mouse brain

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Study finds tiny brain area controls work for rewards

The discovery has implications for psychiatric disorders, particularly depression and anxiety.
a low evening sun peeks through the branches of a giant tree, sending shadows across a lush lawn. three people stroll down a hill.

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Three projects awarded Belonging at Cornell innovation grants

The "Can You Hear My Voice?" project, a collaboration between Arts and Sciences, the ILR School, eCornell and the College of Human Ecology, received one of three Belonging at Cornell innovation grants for 2022.
Two spherical celestial bodies against a dark background

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Cornell helps detect CO2 for first time on faraway world

A large international team found molecular evidence of carbon dioxide on the exoplanet WASP-39b, a giant gaseous world orbiting a sun-like star about 700 light-years away.
Two people stand in a garden

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Seeds of survival: Botanic Gardens honors the Black experience

Arts & Sciences student Jakara Zellner ’23, co-leader on the Garden Ambassador team, who served on the advisory committee and narrated the audio tour of a Cornell Botanic Gardens featuring 21 plants significant to the Black experience in the Americas.
James Turner, the founding director of Cornell’s Africana Studies and Research Center and a a professor emeritus of African and African American Politics and Social Policy in the College of Arts and Sciences,

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James Turner, a ‘giant’ of Africana studies, dies at 82

James Turner, the founding director of Cornell’s Africana Studies and Research Center and a pioneer of the multidisciplinary approach to exploring the African diaspora, died Aug. 6 in Ithaca.
Two people smile, discovering a piece of scientific equipment

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Academic boot camp boosts veterans’ higher ed mission

Professors in physics and classics contributed to the Warrior-Scholar Project (WSP) hosted at Cornell for military veterans July 23 to Aug. 6.
teacher standing at the front of a classroom full of students

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Teachers critical to detecting and reporting child maltreatment

Time spent in school and the resulting contact with teachers and other school staff leads to increases in reports of child maltreatment – cases that would not have been discovered otherwise.
Laura Niemi

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Laura Niemi wins Kaplan Family Fellowship

Niemi won for her work teaching applied moral psychology through community-engaged learning.
protestors with signs

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Interns experience a memorable Washington summer

Students completing internships in Washington, D.C. through the Cornell in Washington program are experiencing an in-person summer.
dark gray worms with pointed ends surrounded by dots of other microscopic things

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Worms as a model for personalized medicine

“You need to figure out how to tailor biomedical recommendations to different people based on their individual metabolism."
3-D shapes, black on top and orange red beneath, in a square of textured gray

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Ice Age human footprints discovered in Utah desert

Altogether 88 footprints were documented, including both adults and children, offering insight into family life in the time of the Pleistocene.
metal sculpture of a figure blindfolded and holding scales

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Courts, not amendments, best route for constitutional reform

Since the mid-20th century, Congress has repurposed Article V of the U.S. Constitution from a tool for constitutional reform into a mechanism for taking positions on issues, according to research by David A. Bateman.
Book cover: The Downfall of the American Order

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Is American influence waning? Book considers what comes next

The collection, “The Downfall of the American Order?” explores global affairs at this moment in history, a turning point in American influence.
Two people hold a laptop-sized piece of equipment

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$3.8M NSF grant begins a new era of early universe research

The grant from the National Science Foundation will support a team of Cornell physicists who smash matter into its component parts to learn about elementary particles and their interactions.
Book cover: Sonorous Desert

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Desert sounds offer lessons in solitude and community

In a new book, Kim Haines-Eitzen explores the rich range of desert sounds and what they can teach us about place, the past, solitude and community.
Ann Simmons smiling, with very short hair, red lipstick, earrings and a black jacket over a black top.

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WSJ Moscow Bureau Chief named A&S Zubrow Visiting Journalist for fall 2022

“We’re privileged to host Ann Simmons on campus at this time of global turmoil to share her deep insights with the Cornell community,” said Ray Jayawardhana, the Harold Tanner Dean of Arts and Sciences.
Person holds baby up in the air

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Babies learn power of voice through experimentation

Cornell researchers have found that babies learn their prelinguistic vocalizations – coos, grunts and vowel sounds – change the behaviors of other people, a key building block of communication.
Collage of green squares

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Cornell Atkinson awards $1.4 million to new sustainability projects

This year’s Academic Venture Fund (AVF) seed grants for research support equitable and sustainable development, offshore wind energy, and improved indoor air quality.
Martha Haynes with glasses, shoulder-length gray hair in a red top, with blurred stars on screen behind her

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‘Follow your dreams,’ writes astronomer Martha Haynes

“The Sky Is for Everyone” is a collection of autobiographical essays by “women who broke down barriers and changed the face of modern astronomy.”
Catherine “Cat” Ramirez Foss

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Recipients of inaugural undergraduate academic advising awards named

Catherine “Cat” Ramirez Foss, Advising Dean in the College of Arts and Sciences, receives one of the two awards, which recognize the critical work of front-line academic advisors.
Fernando Santiago

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Rochester lawyer receives NYS Hometown Alumni Award

Fernando Santiago ’86, the first person in his family to go to college, majored in government in the College of Arts & Sciences.
Person crouching in a field, tinkering with a device near a fence

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Researchers consider invisible hurdles in digital ag design

Enabling farmers to tinker with their own systems and involving them early in the design process could better translate technology from the lab to the field.
Book cover: Adventure Capitalism

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Think twice before founding that free-market utopia

In a new book, Raymond Craib writes that libertarian attempts to escape regulation and build communities structured entirely through market transactions often have calamitous consequences for local populations.
Book cover: Medicine in the Talmud

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Ancient Jewish text preserves real-world remedies

The Babylonian Talmud, a collection of rabbinic writings produced in ancient Persia, contains a great deal of medical knowledge, according to a recent book by the new director of the Jewish Studies Program.
woman looking at another woman's phone

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Overlooked, undervalued: Cornell research seeks to elevate home care workers

Madeline Sterling '08, an Arts & Sciences alum, is part of a team launching a research program to elevate the value of home care workers.
Riché Richardson

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Juneteenth marks emancipation’s progress and delay

The holiday reminds professor Riché Richardson of exciting celebrations of her youth, but also of obstacles that stand in the way of fully achieving Black freedom.
Alison Lurie

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Pulitzer Prize winner Alison Lurie to be celebrated in July 1 memorial

The service and reception honoring the acclaimed writer's life and work are open to the public.
Book cover: Up from the Depths

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How Herman Melville can help us cope with dark times

Prof. Aaron Sachs’ new book tells the stories of two American writers, who he says show us how history can offer hope.
Five clusters of bright orange light surrounding one cluster of dimmer magenta light

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Harnessing machine learning to analyze quantum material

Prof. Eun-Ah Kim's research, using a machine learning technique developed with Cornell computer scientists, sets the stage for insights into new phases of matter.
Giant white dish-shaped structure set in lush hills

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Rapid-fire fast radio burst shows hot space between galaxies

Sending out an occasional and informative cosmic ping from more than 3.5 billion light years away, these quick-fire surges provide a pathway for scientists to comprehend the perplexing, mysterious and million-degree intergalactic medium.
Oil painting of a person in robes at a desk, holding a flaming heart

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Klarman Fellow traces ideas of slavery from ancient Rome to upstate NY

Toni Alimi’s book project, “Slaves of God,” delves deep into the Augustine cannon, explaining the philosopher’s reasons for justifying slavery.
Person staning inside a room with a book shelf

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Michael Koch, Epoch editor, remembered for ‘quiet grace’

Koch’s expertise made a mark on American literature and influenced writers who went on to publish bestselling and prize-winning works of fiction and poetry.
Song Lin

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Song Lin wins EPA Green Chemistry Challenge award

Lin's new process uses readily available substances and inexpensive electrodes to create the large and complicated molecules widely used in the pharmaceutical industry.
Barn-like building with open doors, lit within

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Tear down academic silos: Take an ‘undisciplinary’ approach

A new Cornell study suggests that solving societal problems such as climate change could require dismantling rigid academic boundaries, so that researchers from varying disciplines could work together collaboratively.
Three people in a sunny room with yellow walls

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Student films document Cornell’s LGBTQ history

The film projects for the introductory class, which draws students from all of Cornell’s schools and colleges, celebrate the 30th anniversary of Cornell’s LGBT Studies Program.
J Nation blowing on an instrument made out of long white pipes, with a yellow balloon attached

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Instrument-building festival challenges, inspires

Hosted by the Cornell ReSounds Project, the FutureSounds Festival featured guest builders and performers as well as newly designed instruments and compositions by Cornell students.
The three researchers are sitting around a desk and Ailong Ke is pointing to an image of the IscB molecule on the computer screen.

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Discovery offers starting point for better gene-editing tools

“Transposons are specialized genetic hitchhikers, integrating into and splicing out of our genomes all the time...by defining these enzymes in high resolution, we can tap into their powers.”