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Kaushik Basu

Article

Kaushik Basu receives Humboldt Research Award

Basu plans to use the Humboldt Research Award for economics to work on moral philosophy and game theory, and on law and economics.
Enormous structure made of yellow hexagons; tiny people in clean suits
NASA A view of the James Webb Space Telescope in 2017, from the NASA Goddard cleanroom observation window.

Article

Could alien astronomers have spotted Earth?

In an op-ed on CNN, Lisa Kaltenegger explains how she and other astronomers look for life beyond Earth – and how technologically advanced extraterrestrials might look for us.
Blue oblong shapes (bacteria magnified)

Article

Moonlighting proteins

Brianna Johnson ’21, who has had her own battles with diseases caused by microscopic organisms, found a passion for trying to understand their impacts and intricacies through biological sciences research.
A planet with stars and a dark sky in the background
OpenSpace/American Museum of Natural History Artistic view of the Earth and sun from thousands of miles above our planet, showing that stars can enter and exit a position to see Earth transiting the sun.

Article

Exoplanets get a cosmic front-row seat to find backlit Earth

Astronomers have identified 2,034 nearby star-systems – within 326 light-years – that could find life on Earth by watching our pale blue dot cross our sun.
Cover art for The Humanities Pod

Article

Podcast episode explores creation: medieval poems to Thai temples

A new episode of “The Humanities Pod” explores the language and materiality of belief through literary and anthropological methods of humanities research.
Campus buildings, blue sky with clouds

Article

Two doctoral students receive Ford Fellowships

Doctoral students Monique Pipkin and Ama Bemma Adwetewa-Badu have been selected to receive 2021 Ford Foundation Fellowships. Honorable mentions were awarded to nine additional Cornell graduate students.
Francesco Sgarlata

Article

Klarman postdoc tackles ‘theory of everything’ with first principles

Physicist Francesco Sgarlata is taking a bottom-up approach to finding a theory of quantum gravity.
Books in a display case; colored cloth background

Article

There’s no syllabus for this

Supporting community-engaged learning at Cornell, Amber Haywood ’21 found a way to put her values into action.
Marine Le Pen
Claude Truong-Ngoc /Wikimedia Commons Marine Le Pen

Article

Trends favor Le Pen victory, ‘somersaults’ in French politics

Mabel Berezin, professor of sociology, says that regional elections in France on June 20 could serve as an early indicator of what may come in the 2022 presidential election.
Crowd of people holding signs

Article

Reunion panel steers racism conversation toward action

The panel suggested listening to scholarly experts, implementing new initiatives and engaging students and faculty in organizations beyond the university.
Margaret Washington

Article

Radio interview discusses Juneteenth

On June 15, the "All Things Equal" podcast featured Cornell Arts & Sciences Professor of American History Margaret Washington for a discussion of Juneteenth.
Drawing of a black and red zigzag line
Provided This schematic illustration shows the structure of a conjugated polymer, which is essentially a series of clustered molecules strung along a backbone that can conduct electrons and absorb light.

Article

Magnetic tweezers reveal polymers’ hidden properties

Cornell researchers were able to stretch and twist individual molecules of a conjugated polymer and measure its mechanical and kinetic properties, gaining insights that could eventually lead to more flexible and robust soft electronic materials.
Jamila Michener
Lindsay France/Cornell University Jamila Michener, associate professor of government, says when enslaved people gained their freedom, they lacked the political and socioeconomic power to influence their lives. In many ways, Black people still lack that power, she says.

Article

Juneteenth reverberates with triumph, pain, past and present

The holiday celebrates the day enslaved people gained their freedom. But they lacked political power then, as Black people too often do today, says associate professor Jamila Michener.
Carol-Rose Little, Ph.D. ’20

Article

Removing barriers through remote opportunities

Many Graduate School students, alumni and staff, including linguistics alumna Carol-Rose Little, Ph.D. ’20 have learned to use remote and hybrid environments to their benefit.
Colleen Barry

Article

Colleen Barry named inaugural dean of public policy school

Colleen L. Barry, a professor and department chair at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, has been named the Cornell Jeb E. Brooks School of Public Policy’s first dean, effective Sept. 15.
Liz Kellogg

Article

Pew scholar builds on gene-editing technology

Elizabeth Kellogg, assistant professor of molecular biology and genetics in the College of Arts and Sciences, has been named to the Pew Scholars Program to pursue research into advancing gene editing capability.
Person serving a piece of pie
Jason Koski/Cornell University Michael Stillman enjoys some pie during a Pi Day celebration, 2015

Article

Stillman receives UI achievement award for mathematics

A 2021 Outstanding Achievement Award from the University of Illinois Department of Mathematics recognizes advances in the field by Michael Stillman, professor of mathematics.
Reika Tei
Provided Reika Tei

Article

Six graduate students receive 2021 Wu Scholarships

Six graduate students were awarded 2021 Hsien and Daisy Yen Wu Scholarships. These scholarships recognize graduate students for their academic ability, performance and character as well as financial need.
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