News

Displaying 141 - 160 of 3454

Book cover: Constants of the Motion

Article

Poetry book by Nobel-winning chemist features science, nature

Roald Hoffmann received a Nobel Prize in 1981 for chemistry—and he’s been writing poetry since the 1970s. His fifth book of poetry, “Constants in Motion,” was recently published by Dos Madres Press. These poems interweave Hoffmann’s scientific perspective with his poetic sensibility.
White and blue Israeli flag in front of stone buildings

Article

Netanyahu enters election in high spirits, despite prospect of deadlock

On Tuesday, Israelis will vote in their fourth parliamentary election in two years. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s party is engaged in a tight race that some commentators say will end up rewarding Netanyahu’s management of vaccine distribution in recent months. Uriel Abulof, visiting associate professor of government, comments.
Face on computer screen of President Bill Clinton
Jason Koski/Cornell University Former President Bill Clinton speaks March 18 during the first event in the Milstein State of Democracy Address series.

Article

President Clinton: U.S. in ‘dogfight’ for democracy

During a March 18 webinar on the state of American democracy hosted by the Institute of Politics and Global Affairs (IOPGA), former President Bill Clinton challenged more than 3,600 students and other viewers to stand up for democratic norms including voting rights.
Event poster: "Benchmark"

Article

Memories, tech intertwine in student play ‘Benchmark’

“Benchmark,” a play by Information Science Ph.D. student Anna Evtushenko about a woman who relies on technology to preserve her memories, will stream online March 26 and 27.
Event poster for "spit fire, drink gasoline"

Article

Solo performance 'spit fire, drink gasoline (repeat)' premieres March 25

An original solo performance, “spit fire, drink gasoline (repeat),” created and presented by Levi Wilson ’21, will have its YouTube premiere on March 25, available to view anytime until April 25. The event includes a Q&A with internationally acclaimed performance artist Tim Miller.
Candle and flame, dark background

Article

Ignoring anti-Asian crimes furthers white supremacist violence

Eight people were shot and killed Tuesday night at Atlanta-area massage parlors, six of whom were of Asian descent. Christine Bacareza Balance, director of the Asian American Studies Program and professor of performing & media arts at Cornell University, says such violent acts are a part of the white supremacist systemic violence against Black, indigenous, and all other communities of color.
Highway with lights snakes between mountain and bay

Article

US-China summit: ‘It's so cold in Alaska’

Top officials from the U.S. and China will meet in Anchorage on Thursday and Friday for the first high level summit after President Biden took office. Cornell College of Arts and Sciences faculty experts Allen Carlson discusses the political and economic implications of the summit.
Three students on the Arts Quad
Lindsay France/Cornell University Anjan Mani ’23 (left) and Alexander Chung ’21, near the Arts Quad.

Article

Students save man from frigid lake after fishing mishap

“I’ve been a swimmer for 15 years, so I didn’t hesitate to jump in," said Alexander Chung '21.
Orange and yellow origami bird

Article

Self-folding nanotech creates world’s smallest origami bird

The researchers have generated a throng of nanoscale machines and components, each seemingly faster, smarter and more elegant than the last.
Person places flowers beneath a tree

Article

What Sarah Everard’s Murder Illuminates—And Might Obscure

Writing in The Atlantic, Kate Manne, associate professor of philosophy, argues that we must consider why the Sarah Everard's murder case has attracted so much attention, to the exclusion of many others.
Red book cover: How to Tell a Joke

Article

Translation updates Cicero’s treatise on jokes as ‘weapons’

Michael Fontaine’s lively new translation amuses as well as instructs.
Seven students and the bear mascot, looking happy

Article

Giving Day brings Cornellians together, shatters records

In 24 hours, donors raised a record-breaking $10,040,921 to support Cornell students, programs and research on the university’s seventh Giving Day, March 11. Gifts from 14,411 donors poured in steadily throughout the day, with support from all 50 U.S. states, plus Puerto Rico and Washington D.C., as well as nearly 80 countries.
Laptop on a desk with a phone

Article

Event highlights strategies for online teaching

As instructors and students are still adjusting to the online format imposed on them at the outbreak of the pandemic a year ago, the Cornell Online Learning Community asked speakers and participants at its 7th annual event, “What Works and What’s Next in online teaching and learning?” Over 100 participants gathered virtually on March 9 to look back on a year of online teaching to understand successful strategies to adapt as they continue developing this relatively new learning space.
Yehonathan Indursky

Article

Director of Netflix hit “Shtisel” highlights Jewish Studies event

Yehonathan Indursky, director and writer of Netflix hit “Shtisel,” will talk about the series during an online event hosted by Cornell’s Jewish Studies Program on March 24.
Two gold rings on a dictionary definition of 'marriage'

Article

Same-sex marriage exposes 'cavernous divide' between Vatican, Catholics

The Vatican’s orthodoxy office has issued a formal response to a question about whether Catholic clergy have the authority to bless same-sex unions, saying the Catholic Church won’t bless same-sex unions since God “cannot bless sin.” Professors Landon Schnabel (sociology) and Kim Haines-Eitzen (religious studies) comment.
Person in lab, wearing protextive white gear
Provided Cornell doctoral student Ryan Porter prepares an superconducting radio-frequency cavity made from the element Nb3Sn in the clean room of Newman Lab.

Article

Cheaper, greener particle accelerators will speed innovation

A team of scientists at the Center for Bright Beams – a National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center led by Cornell – are working on the next generation of superconducting materials that will greatly reduce the costs associated with operating large particle accelerators and lessen their environmental impact. The research could also make it easier for smaller institutions and industry to use these critical tools.
Milky Way

Article

Ancient light illuminates matter that fuels galaxy formation

Using light from the Big Bang, an international team led by Cornell and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has begun to unveil the material which fuels galaxy formation. Lead author is Stefania Amodeo, a Cornell postdoctoral researcher in astronomy, who now conducts research at the Observatory of Strasbourg, France.
President Bill Clinton

Article

President Clinton to speak on the future of U.S. democracy

President Bill Clinton will join former U.S. Rep. Steve Israel on March 18 for a conversation about the future of democracy in America. The program launches the new Milstein State of Democracy Addresses.
hand holding fork with food on it

Article

The biology of hunger

Nilay Yapici, Nancy and Peter Meinig Family Investigator in the Life Sciences and assistant professor of neurobiology and behavior, investigates the mysterious brain-body connections that regulate eating behavior.
woman standing by a wall

Article

College Scholar graduate takes position in local DA’s office

Ariana Marmora ’11 was a College Scholar with interests in government, philosophy, intellectual history, comparative literature and public service.
Top