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woman standing in front of school

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Exploring life in front of a classroom

Stephanie Naing is working with sixth and seventh graders this summer who want to gain entrance into New York City's independent schools.
3-D shapes, black on top and orange red beneath, in a square of textured gray

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Ice Age human footprints discovered in Utah desert

Altogether 88 footprints were documented, including both adults and children, offering insight into family life in the time of the Pleistocene.
student digging in the woods

Article

Chasing carbon from trees to soils

A group of students, including some in the Nexus Scholars Program, completed field work and analysis this summer on soil coming from a long-term forest fertilization experiment.
man standing outside in New York City

Article

Internship offers insights into banking career

Eros Georgiou ’25 is spending the summer exploring a career in banking, with help from a Summer Experience Grant.
Book cover: Corrections in Ink

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In a Brutally Honest Memoir, Alum Recalls Addiction and Imprisonment

Having returned to complete her degree in literatures in English, reporter Keri Blakinger ’11, BA ’14, now covers the prison system for the Marshall Project.
woman with lab equipment

Article

Student researchers explore changing chemical reactions

Undergrads in the Musser lab are using ultrafast laser spectroscopy to understand how organic semiconductors behave when they absorb and emit light.
two women outside

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Studying connections between animal-human health

Their map will visualize research about the spread of existing or known and new or emerging zoonotic diseases.
metal sculpture of a figure blindfolded and holding scales

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Courts, not amendments, best route for constitutional reform

Since the mid-20th century, Congress has repurposed Article V of the U.S. Constitution from a tool for constitutional reform into a mechanism for taking positions on issues, according to research by David A. Bateman.
Anna Shechtman

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Get a Clue: Anna Shechtman Is a Star in the World of Crosswords

The Klarman Fellow (and future prof) is a regular contributor to the New Yorker—and she created a puzzle just for Cornellians!
geometric pattern in browns and blues: a dry part of Australia seen from above

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Satellite Imaging, Not Tourism, Is the Modern Space Race

While Jeff Bezos, Richard Branson and Elon Musk send people into orbit, real-time mapping of the Earth has much broader applications, writes Dean Ray Jayawardhana.
Book cover: The Downfall of the American Order

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Is American influence waning? Book considers what comes next

The collection, “The Downfall of the American Order?” explores global affairs at this moment in history, a turning point in American influence.
Two people hold a laptop-sized piece of equipment

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$3.8M NSF grant begins a new era of early universe research

The grant from the National Science Foundation will support a team of Cornell physicists who smash matter into its component parts to learn about elementary particles and their interactions.
American flag background with two people appearing at the sides

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Will Biden and Trump face off again in 2024?

In Washington Post commentary, Roper Center director Peter K. Enns bucks conventional polling by asking Americans to name who they would like to see on the ticket, a technique that has proved remarkably accurate.
Person posing at a piano

Article

Center for Historical Keyboards summer academy hosts 12 young piano stars

Young artists from around the world will be immersed in one of the world’s most significant collections of performance-ready historical pianos, with performances open to the public August 1-6.
Book cover: Sonorous Desert

Article

Desert sounds offer lessons in solitude and community

Nearly 1,700 years ago, Christian monks trekked into the deserts near Israel and Egypt in search of a quiet spot for contemplation. In a new book, Kim Haines-Eitzen explores the rich range of desert sounds and what they can teach us about place, the past, solitude and community.
Stephan's Quntet

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Cornell astronomers cheer new space telescope’s first images

Faculty respond to the release of the first images from the James Webb Space Telescope
Ann Simmons smiling, with very short hair, red lipstick, earrings and a black jacket over a black top.

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WSJ Moscow Bureau Chief named A&S Zubrow Visiting Journalist for fall 2022

“We’re privileged to host Ann Simmons on campus at this time of global turmoil to share her deep insights with the Cornell community,” said Ray Jayawardhana, the Harold Tanner Dean of Arts and Sciences.
Poster: Communicating Mathematics

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Talking numbers: Cornell hosts math communication workshop

August 8-11, mathematics researchers and college-level teachers will discuss what it takes to communicate effectively among mathematicians, to students, and to the public.
Person writing on a chalkboard

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Klarman fellow achieves ‘beautiful results’ with outstanding math problems

Christian Gaetz uses his specific focus in mathematics – algebraic combinatorics – to make exciting progress on open problems.
smiling woman

Article

Celluloid recollections: Cornell Cinema names new director

A new director, Molly Ryan, will take the helm of Cornell Cinema this fall, succeeding Mary Fessenden, who has led the organization for 35 years, eight years as 8 manager and 27 as director.
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