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Marine Le Pen
Claude Truong-Ngoc /Wikimedia Commons Marine Le Pen

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Trends favor Le Pen victory, ‘somersaults’ in French politics

Mabel Berezin, professor of sociology, says that regional elections in France on June 20 could serve as an early indicator of what may come in the 2022 presidential election.
Crowd of people holding signs

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Reunion panel steers racism conversation toward action

The panel, moderated by Noliwe Rooks, discussed ways to steer conversation toward meaningful action, including: listening to scholarly experts; implementing new initiatives; and engaging students and faculty in organizations beyond the university.
Margaret Washington

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Radio interview discusses Juneteenth

On June 15, the "All Things Equal" podcast featured Cornell Arts & Sciences Professor of American History Margaret Washington for a discussion of Juneteenth.
Drawing of a black and red zigzag line
Provided This schematic illustration shows the structure of a conjugated polymer, which is essentially a series of clustered molecules strung along a backbone that can conduct electrons and absorb light.

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Magnetic tweezers reveal polymers’ hidden properties

Cornell researchers were able to stretch and twist individual molecules of a conjugated polymer and measure its mechanical and kinetic properties, gaining insights that could eventually lead to more flexible and robust soft electronic materials.
Jamila Michener
Lindsay France/Cornell University Jamila Michener, associate professor of government, says when enslaved people gained their freedom, they lacked the political and socioeconomic power to influence their lives. In many ways, Black people still lack that power, she says.

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Juneteenth reverberates with triumph, pain, past and present

The holiday celebrates the day enslaved people gained their freedom. But they lacked political power then, as Black people too often do today, says associate professor Jamila Michener.
Carol-Rose Little, Ph.D. ’20

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Removing barriers through remote opportunities

Many Graduate School students, alumni and staff, including linguistics alumna Carol-Rose Little, Ph.D. ’20 have learned to use remote and hybrid environments to their benefit.
Colleen Barry

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Colleen Barry named inaugural dean of public policy school

Colleen L. Barry, a professor and department chair at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, has been named the Cornell Jeb E. Brooks School of Public Policy’s first dean, effective Sept. 15.
Liz Kellogg

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Pew scholar builds on gene-editing technology

Elizabeth Kellogg, assistant professor of molecular biology and genetics in the College of Arts and Sciences, has been named to the Pew Scholars Program to pursue research into advancing gene editing capability.
Person serving a piece of pie
Jason Koski/Cornell University Michael Stillman enjoys some pie during a Pi Day celebration, 2015

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Stillman receives UI achievement award for mathematics

A 2021 Outstanding Achievement Award from the University of Illinois Department of Mathematics recognizes advances in the field by Michael Stillman, professor of mathematics.
Illustration of blue and grey balls layered over blue diamonds and yellow balls
Provided A Cornell team sought to explore the properties of monolayer iron selenide because, as a high-temperature superconductor, it has the potential to help researchers create novel electrical devices that conduct with zero resistance and, therefore, much greater efficiency.

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Monolayer superconductor exhibits unusual behavior

Cornell researchers have discovered a rare “pseudogap” phenomenon that helps explain how the superconducting transition temperature can be greatly boosted in a single monolayer of iron selenide, and how it might be applied to other superconducting materials.
McGraw Tower seen behind a small hill

Article

Gift endows, names Cornell Jeb E. Brooks School of Public Policy

The major gift from the Brooks family, whose Cornell roots span three generations, provides an early boost to help the university’s newest school achieve world-class excellence.
University campus seen from above, sunny day

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New impact grants expand humanities research

The Society for the Humanities added to its grant offerings in 2021, awarding Humanities Impact Grants to humanities projects that “engage in broader public conversations with social impact in mind.”
Joseph Margulies

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Margulies receives Levy faculty engagement award

Joseph Margulies, professor of the practice of law and government, has been awarded the 2021 George D. Levy Faculty Award for his work to break down barriers for previously incarcerated people in Tompkins County.
wooden structure set into the ground
Ministry of Culture - Italy The Noceto Vasca Votiva’s lower and upper tanks, dated to 1444 and 1432 B.C., respectively.

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Researchers link ancient wooden structure to water ritual

Cornell researchers used dendrochronology and a form of radiocarbon dating called “wiggle-matching” to identify the ancient origins, and possible purpose, of a unique wooden structure in Northern Italy.
Abstract asian art

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New Global Asia minor expands study options for undergrads

Students throughout the university can now minor in Global Asia Studies, with faculty approving the new area of study in May.
Jamila Michener

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Employers are Begging for Workers. Maybe That's a Good Thing.

Jamila Michener, associate professor of government, discusses employer panic, America's poverty addiction and the messy politics of work on the Ezra Klein Show.
Supreme Court building

Article

A Supreme Court Case Poses a Threat to L.G.B.T.Q. Foster Kids

In a New York Times op-ed, Stephen Vider considers the possible repercussions of the Supreme Court's decision, expected this month, on Fulton v. City of Philadelphia, a case that asks whether the city of Philadelphia can bar Catholic Social Services from screening future foster parents.
Person wearing a business suit

Article

Face value? Attractiveness biases financial decisions

Research by Vivian Zayas, associate professor of psychology, found attractive investment partners were seen as more trustworthy even if they weren’t the most profitable.
Stack of books

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New A&S faculty bring Indigenous studies expertise

Two new faculty members who specialize in Native American and Indigenous literatures will join the Department of Literatures in English for the fall of 2021.
Three people in the mountians
Maya Cutforth ’20, her father Nick, and her sister Asia hiking Colorado’s Mount Flora in July 2020

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Class of 2020: Learning to let it flow

Eight members of the Class of 2020 share candid reflections on their lives over this past year.
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