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Byline: Tom Fleischman

Person wearing a bright yellow jacket places a ticket on a car windshield

Article

Parking ticket reminders work, but not for all

New research by Cornell behavioral economists reveals that people who would benefit the most from gentle “nudges” to pay their fines – those who are least responsive to tickets in the first place – respond least to those reminders.
Red wires on a black background

Article

Cornell joins Schmidt AI in Science postdoc research initiative

Cornell, including A&S, will recruit and train a cohort of up to 100 postdoctoral fellows in the fields of natural sciences and engineering. 
Person wearing red and pearls, speaking at a podium

Article

Pollack lauds ‘amazing Cornellians’ in State of the University speech

Cornell's president highlighted recent achievements of Arts and Sciences faculty.
a low evening sun peeks through the branches of a giant tree, sending shadows across a lush lawn. three people stroll down a hill.

Article

Three projects awarded Belonging at Cornell innovation grants

The "Can You Hear My Voice?" project, a collaboration between Arts and Sciences, the ILR School, eCornell and the College of Human Ecology, received one of three Belonging at Cornell innovation grants for 2022.
Ray Jayawardhana

Article

Jayawardhana reappointed A&S dean, named Bethe professor

“Dean Jayawardhana has been an exceptional leader of the university’s most academically diverse college,” Provost Michael Kotlikoff said.
Pink buds on a tree branch; a bell tower in the background

Article

Radical Collaboration initiative adds AI, quantum, design tech

The universitywide initiative has resulted in the hiring and retention of world-class faculty, millions of research dollars invested, and published research that has helped push science forward and change lives in New York state, the nation and the world.
Two police officers stand near a police car

Article

Legal language affects how police officers are judged

Referring to police using the legal phrase “objectively reasonable” puts the officer in a more favorable light, regardless of race, according to new research from Neil Lewis Jr. ’13, assistant professor of communication, and doctoral student Mikaela Spruill.
Sabrina Karim

Article

Assistant professor wins NSF early-career award

Sabrina Karim, Hardis Family Assistant Professor of government, has received an NSF early career award.
Bruce Lewenstein

Article

Bruce Lewenstein appointed university ombudsman

Bruce Lewenstein, professor of science communication in both the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the College of Arts and Sciences, has been appointed Cornell’s 13th university ombudsman.
Campus buildings, cloudy sky, lake

Article

Seven faculty members elected AAAS fellows

Seven Cornell faculty members have been elected fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the world’s largest general scientific society. This year's fellows, 564 in all, will be honored at a virtual event Feb. 19.
Glass beakers on a table, one partially filled with liquid

Article

Four assistant professors win early-career awards

Two professors in the Department of Chemistry & Chemical Biology have received Early Career Awards to further their research.
Alex Townsend

Article

Eleven assistant professors win NSF early-career awards

Alex Townsend, Goenka Family Assistant Professor of mathematics, is among the 11 Cornell faculty members who have recently received National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development Awards.
Three students on the Arts Quad
Lindsay France/Cornell University Anjan Mani ’23 (left) and Alexander Chung ’21, near the Arts Quad.

Article

Students save man from frigid lake after fishing mishap

“I’ve been a swimmer for 15 years, so I didn’t hesitate to jump in," said Alexander Chung '21.
Author Ijeoma Oluo, seen on a computer screen

Article

Oluo offers practical antiracism strategies in MLK Lecture

Author Ijeoma Oluo, the featured speaker at the virtual Martin Luther King Jr. Commemorative Lecture, held March 1, said the white male in America has always enjoyed relatively unfettered passage – usually at the expense of others.
Katherine A. Tschida

Article

Agarwal, Rush, Tschida, Udell win Sloan Fellowships

Katherine A. Tschida, assistant professor of psychology, is among four Cornell faculty who have won 2021 Sloan Research Fellowships from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. The fellowships support early-career faculty members’ original research and education related to science, technology, mathematics and economics.
Ijeoma Oluo

Article

Author, journalist Ijeoma Oluo to give annual MLK Lecture

Seattle-based writer Ijeoma Oluo will give the 2021 Martin Luther King, Jr. Commemorative Lecture at Cornell, in a virtual forum on March 1. This year’s event will be a conversation between Oluo and Edward Baptist, professor of history and author of “The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism."
book cover: 1774, The Long Year of Revolution

Article

Professor emerita to discuss latest work in ‘Book Breaks’

Mary Beth Norton will discuss her book, “1774: The Long Year of Revolution,” in the next “Book Breaks” discussion, hosted Jan. 31 by the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History in New York City.
Peng Chen, Peter J. W. Debye Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biology

Article

A first: Cornell researchers quantify photocurrent loss in particle interface

With a growing global population will come increased energy consumption, and sustainable forms of energy sources such as solar fuels and solar electricity will be in even greater demand. And as these forms of power proliferate, the focus will shift to improved efficiency.

David Henderson

Article

Professor Emeritus David Henderson dies in accident

David Wilson Henderson, professor emeritus of mathematics, died Dec. 20 in Newark, Delaware, from injuries suffered when he was struck by a vehicle in a pedestrian crosswalk in Bethany Beach, Delaware. He was 79.

According to published reports, Henderson was struck shortly after 5 p.m. on Dec. 19. After being taken to nearby Beebe Medical Center in Lewes, Delaware, Henderson was transported to Christiana Hospital in Newark, where he died the next day.

Alex Hayes and Ailong Ke

Article

Provost Research Innovation Award winners announced

Innovative research with great impact is one of Cornell’s hallmarks, and to recognize some of the best examples of that work, the Office of the Provost has established an annual award that highlights the depth and breadth of the university’s research efforts.

The inaugural Provost Research Innovation Awards recognize midcareer faculty from engineering, the humanities, life sciences, social sciences and physical sciences.

Illustration of neural networks

Article

Nine faculty members elected AAAS fellows

Nine Cornell faculty members have been elected fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the world’s largest general scientific society.

Sarah Kreps

Article

Global Grand Challenges event to spark faculty dialogue

What are the biggest threats facing inhabitants of Earth in the 21st century? A two-day symposium will bring together people from across the university for a dialogue on the “grand challenges” of a world that’s both more connected than ever and increasingly fractured.

Supreme Court justices

Article

Doctoral student applies physics modeling to voting of SCOTUS ‘Super Court’

The maelstrom surrounding the nomination and subsequent confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court was to be expected, when one justice’s vote could change the country’s moral compass for generations. But looking at the high court over a period of decades, have political leanings been its strongest barometer?

Article

Arthur Ashkin, Ph.D. ’52, shares Nobel Prize in physics

Ashkin received the prize for his invention of "optical tweezers" that move objects with light.
Lawrence Kidder

Article

Lawrence Kidder elected fellow of American Physical Society

Award-winning senior astronomy research associate Lawrence Kidder, who contributed to the 2016 confirmation of gravitational waves detected in 2015, has been elected a fellow of the American Physical Society (APS).
Event recorded with the CMS detector in 2012 at a proton-proton centre of mass energy of 8 TeV. 3D perspective. Courtesy of CERN.

Article

Cornell part of $25M NSF effort to untangle future physics data

Particle accelerators such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) produce massive amounts of data that help answer long-held questions regarding Earth and the far reaches of the universe. The Higgs boson, which had been the missing link in the Standard Model of Particle Physics, was discovered there in 2012 and earned researchers the 2013 Nobel Prize in physics.

Article

Unraveling titanium dioxide’s self-cleaning ability

Titanium dioxide is one of several minerals that are self-cleaning; they use energy from the sun to convert any “schmutz” that lands on their surface to a harmless gas, which then floats away.

Donald Holcomb

Article

Donald Holcomb, emeritus physics professor, dies at 92

Emeritus professor of physics Donald F. Holcomb, who served two terms as chair of the department and championed the cause of improving physics education, died Aug. 9 in his residence at Kendal at Ithaca.
Members of the Brett Fors lab in chemistry

Article

On-demand polymers may yield designer materials

Researchers at Cornell are devising a method for creating new polymers in much the same way that a jewelry maker creates a beaded necklace.
Image from Cornell University College of Arts and Sciences

Article

Accelerator project gets push from National Academy of Sciences

A National Academy of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine (NAS) committee has endorsed the idea of building an electron-ion collider (EIC) in the United States, for the purpose of expanding understanding of the fundamental building blocks of matter.

Image from Cornell University College of Arts and Sciences

Article

Singer group will use DOE funding to create new quantum states of matter

Andrej Singer, assistant professor of materials science and engineering and David Croll Sesquicentennial Faculty Fellow, will lead a three-year project funded by the Department of Energy’s Office of Science that will attempt to create new quantum states of matter.

Image from Cornell University College of Arts and Sciences

Article

Garbage to gold: getting good results from bad data

Researchers sought a way to obtain usable protein structure images without the expense and time of an X-ray free electron laser source.
Image from Cornell University College of Arts and Sciences

Article

Guinness World Record for micro view into hidden worlds

In a recent research paper published in Nature, a group led by physics professors David Muller and Sol Gruner claimed a world record for electron microscope resolution using a high-powered detector and a technique called ptychography. Their technique was shown to measure down to 0.39 ångströms or 0.039 nanometers (one-billionth of a meter).

Image from Cornell University College of Arts and Sciences

Article

Electron microscope detector achieves record resolution

Electron microscopy has allowed scientists to see individual atoms, but even at that resolution not everything is clear.

Hector D. Abruna, Cornell Arts & Sciences Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biology (CHEM), in the lab with post-doctoral students.

Article

$10.75M grant aids next-gen fuel cell development

Fuel cells could someday power numerous devices – automobiles and mass transit systems, buildings, and virtually any type of portable electronic device.

Unlike batteries, which eventually run out of power (and thus need to be recharged), a fuel cell will continue to generate electrical energy as long as it has a fuel – usually hydrogen – and oxygen or some other oxidant necessary for the complete electrochemical reaction.

Michael Niemack

Article

Three on faculty honored by World Economic Forum

An A&S physics professor is one of 50 scientists under the age of 40 named among the top young scientists.
Hector Abruna

Article

A&S faculty member elected to National Academy of Sciences

Hector Abruña's research emphasizes fundamental studies of battery and fuel cell systems to molecular electronics.
Jerrold Meinwald

Article

Jerrold Meinwald, 2014 National Medal of Science winner, dies at 91

Jerrold Meinwald, the Goldwin Smith Professor of Chemistry Emeritus and a 2014 winner of the National Medal of Science, the nation’s highest honor for achievement in science and engineering, died April 23 in Ithaca. He was 91.

Image from Cornell University College of Arts and Sciences

Article

Twelve assistant professors win NSF early-career awards

The awards support junior faculty members’ research projects and outreach efforts.
model of quantum computation

Article

Researchers pave an enlightened path to anyons and quantum computation

Their work provides a blueprint for future work involving other types of anyons and more complicated quantum states.
hydrogen bonds

Article

First proof of hydrogen-bonded water wires could lead to better desalination

Identifying the chirality of water structures could inspire the design of more efficient purification technologies.
Chen

Article

Understanding nanocatalysts' 'talk' could better inform design

Enzymes are nature’s best nanoscale catalysts, and often show what’s known as catalytic allostery – that is, reactions at one site affecting reactions at another site, typically a few nanometers away, without direct interaction between the reactants.

McGraw Tower

Article

University reaffirms its commitment to, support of undocumented students

Numerous resources are available on campus for undocumented students with and without DACA status.
A sapling

Article

It's mostly luck, not pluck, that determines lifetime reproductive success

While trait variation can influence the fate of a population, researchers found that the fates of individuals are often determined by “dumb luck.”
Chemistry professor

Article

Chemistry professor wins Sloan fellowships

Assistant professors Brett Fors, Karthik Sridharan and Jin Suntivich have been named recipients of Alfred P. Sloan Foundation fellowships. These awards support early-career faculty members’ original research and broad-based education related to science, technology and economic performance.

Man shooting basketball

Article

For the win (or tie): Most avoid risk, despite better chance at reward

Say you’re the coach of a basketball team that’s trailing by two points in the dying seconds of a game. Your team has the ball and you call a timeout to set up a play.

Or imagine your football team has just scored a touchdown with three seconds to play to pull to within one point. Instead of immediately sending out the placekicker for the point-after, you call your final timeout to discuss your next move.

researcher

Article

Research probes key protein's role in cancer cell growth

Two new studies led by Hening Lin, professor of chemistry and chemical biology, offer new insights into oncogene RAS, the most frequently mutated gene of its type in human cancer.
Aye lab students

Article

Aye Lab takes its protein-assessing tool to the next level

In 2016, Yimon Aye, Howard Milstein Faculty Fellow and assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, introduced the world to “T-REX” – a chemical method for targeting and modulating single proteins to analyze and screen for specific oxidation-reduction (redox) events, which are vital to many basic functions of life.

A chart comparing various geometric shapes

Article

Physicists take first step toward cell-sized robots

These electricity-conducting, environment-sensing, shape-changing machines could become a powerful source for exploration.
close up of cell

Article

Randomness a key in spread of disease, other ‘evil’

An unfortunate church dinner more than 100 years ago did more than just spread typhoid fever to scores of Californians. It led theorists on a quest to understand why many diseases – including typhoid, measles, polio, malaria, even cancer – take so much longer to develop in some affected people than in others.

Research in the lab

Article

Newly developed techniques shed light on key protein’s regulatory ability

Fundamental processes that occur along strands of DNA, including RNA transcription and DNA replication, commonly encounter obstacles – or “roadblocks” – that can impede progress and ultimately result in mutations and/or DNA damage.

diagram of topological superconductor

Article

Keck-funded group proposes new topological superconductor

The Keck Foundation announced in early July that it had awarded $1 million to a Cornell cross-campus collaboration of professors in engineering and physics aimed at turning theory into reality – namely, creating a specific topological superconducting material that could help pave the way to quantum computing.

image of Paul McEuen's work

Article

Cornell collaboration reports unique property of bilayer graphene

Imagine walking through the Northwest wilderness, camera phone at the ready, hoping to catch at least a faint glimpse of Bigfoot, and instead returning home with an Ansel Adams-quality picture of the mythical beast as he lumbers past you.

That’s kind of what a team led by physics professor Paul McEuen has done in research into the optical properties of single-atom-thick layers of graphene.

Lt. Gov Hochul

Article

Lt. Gov. Hochul announces $15M from state for CHESS upgrade

The grant will provide CHESS with enhanced capabilities, making it a leading synchrotron source in the U.S.
Steven Strogatz

Article

Strogatz's study of 'swarmalators' could direct future science

How does the Japanese tree frog figure into the latest work of noted mathematician Steven Strogatz? As it turns out, quite prominently.

Itai Cohen

Article

Top-flight rheometer allows for outside-the-box research

Until last week, if students in Itai Cohen’s research group wanted to perform advanced measurements on a fluid – such as applying both rotation and sinusoidal oscillations to gauge whether the flow disruption was hydrodynamically or contact-mediated – they’d have to drive 330 miles east.
Justin Wilson

Article

Binding molecule could improve injected radiation therapy

Radiation therapy has been proven effective for the treatment of cancer, but its side effects can be severe depending on the patient and the location of the tumor.

Model of electron valance

Article

Where did those electrons go? Decades-old mystery solved

The concept of “valence” – the ability of a particular atom to combine with other atoms by exchanging electrons – is one of the cornerstones of modern chemistry and solid-state physics.
Visualization of enhanced catalytic activity

Article

First-ever visualization of enhanced catalytic activity reported

Just as two heads are better than one when trying to solve a problem, two metals are better than one when trying to catalyze a chemical reaction.

Dean Gretchen Ritter speaking on a panel of participants

Article

Milstein: Program will embrace long-held Cornell ethos

“Think differently” – it’s been a central theme at Cornell for more than 150 years and a driving force behind numerous educational initiatives including the new Cornell Tech campus, which opened this fall on Roosevelt Island in the heart of New Yor

Illustration of polymer growth

Article

Magnetic tweezers reveal ‘hairballs’ in polymer growth

Conventional wisdom has said that when molecules known as monomers band together to create a polymer chain, that creation takes place steadily as the chain forms, like spaghetti out of a pasta maker. But a Cornell research collaboration shows that’s just not the case.

Fluorescence micrograph of a live HeLa cell.

Article

Advance in lipid imaging could impact cancer treatment

A cellular biology “mystery” is closer to being solved, thanks to sleuthing in the lab of Jeremy Baskin, assistant professor and Nancy and Peter Meinig Family Investigator in the Life Sciences in the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology and the Weill Institute for Cell and Molecular Biology.

An orange octopus with blue spots

Article

Octopus inspires 3-D texture morphing project

A group led by Rob Shepherd, assistant professor in the Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, is using the cephalopod as inspiration for a method to morph flat surfaces into three-dimensional ones on demand.
student working using large microscope for research

Article

Center for Materials Research's NSF funding extended, increased

The Cornell Center for Materials Research – which through research and education is enhancing national capabilities in science, technology, engineering, mathematics and materials research at all levels – has been has been granted $23.2 million for the next six years from the National Science Foundation.
Yimon Aye

Article

Aye group discovers avenue for precision cancer treatment

One of the goals of personalized medicine is to be able to determine which treatment would work best by sequencing a patient’s genome. New research from the lab of Yimon Aye, assistant professor of chemistry and chemical biology, could help make that approach a reality.

Researcher standing infront of American flag

Article

Mouse tracking may reveal ability to resist temptation

The devil on your right shoulder is telling you, “Go ahead, grab that candy bar! You know you want it!”

Meanwhile, the angel on your left is gently saying, “The apple is a much healthier option, isn’t it?”

Graphs showing solitary waves

Article

Surprising nature of quantum solitary waves revealed

Solitary waves – known as solitons – appear in many forms. Perhaps the most recognizable is the tsunami, which forms following a disruption on the ocean floor and can travel, unabated, at high speeds for hundreds of miles.

Clifford J. Earle

Article

Clifford Earle, emeritus professor of math, dies at 81

Clifford J. Earle, professor emeritus of mathematics, whose nearly 40-year tenure at Cornell included three years as chair of the math department, died June 12 at Hospicare in Ithaca. He was 81.

Born Nov. 3, 1935, in Racine, Wisconsin, Earle earned his bachelor’s degree from Swarthmore College in 1957, and his master’s (1958) and doctorate (1962) from Harvard University.

Jeremy Baskin

Article

Baskin, Chang win Beckman Young Investigator award

Assistant professors Jeremy Baskin, from the College of Arts and Sciences, and Pamela Chang, from the College of Veterinary Medicine, are among eight assistant professors across the nation to be named a Beckman Young Investigator, a prize is given to promising young faculty members in the early stages of their academic careers in the chemical and life sciences.

Steven Strogatz

Article

Strogatz, colleagues aim to improve math communications

Mathematicians often struggle with the idea of communication – to the rest of the world, and even with each other – but a recently secured grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) will help math “evangelist” Steven Strogatz and his colleagues tackle that problem.

John Marohon

Article

Group's measuring tool probes solar-cell materials

Next-generation solar cells made from organic compounds hold great promise in meeting future energy needs, but researchers are still striving to gain a deep understanding of the materials involved – including the efficiency with which they convert light into mobile charge, known as photocapacitance.

Illustration of hydration

Article

Water forms 'spine of hydration' around DNA, group finds

Water is the Earth’s most abundant natural resource, but it’s also something of a mystery due to its unique solvation characteristics – that is, how things dissolve in it.

Professor Hening Lin

Article

SIRT6's ability to suppress cancer cell growth is explained

The group found that preventing a certain type of reaction slows cell division and, therefore, cancer cell proliferation.
Yimon Aye

Article

Yimon Aye awarded young investigator cancer research prize

Yimon Aye, a Howard Milstein faculty fellow and assistant professor of chemistry and chemical biology in the College of Arts and Sciences with a secondary appointment at Weill Cornell Medicine, is one of six winners of this year’s Pershing Square Sohn Prize for Young Investigators in Cancer Research, which supports New York-based scientists exploring innovative avenues in the fight against cancer.

Geoffrey W. Coats in his lab

Article

Chemistry's Coates elected to National Academy of Sciences

Geoffrey W. Coates, the Tisch University Professor in the Department of Chemistry & Chemical Biology, is one of 84 new members elected to the National Academy of Sciences, the academy announced May 2.

Robert Hughes

Article

Robert Hughes, professor emeritus of chemistry, dies at 92

Robert E. Hughes, Ph.D. ’52, who taught chemistry at Cornell for 16 years and was co-founder of the University of Pennsylvania’s Laboratory for Research on the Structure of Matter (LRSM), died at his home in Round Hill, Virginia, April 2.
Eun-Ah Kim

Article

Group works toward devising next-gen superconductor

The experimental realization of ultrathin graphene – which earned two scientists from the University of Manchester, U.K., the Nobel Prize in physics in 2010 – has ushered in a new age in materials research.
Data map of Manhattan showing traffic patterns

Article

Ride-sharing study findings are scalable to different cities

Results from analyzing a huge data set of GPS information could point city planners toward a “greener” future.
Geoffrey Coates

Article

Polymer additive could revolutionize plastics recycling

The discovery also could spawn a whole new class of mechanically tough polymer blends.

Nilay Yapici and Kyle Lancaster

Article

Brito, Lambert, Yapici, Lancaster receive Sloan Fellowships

Assistant professors Ilana Brito, Guillaume Lambert, Kyle Lancaster and Nilay Yapici have been named recipients of Alfred P. Sloan Foundation fellowships that support early career faculty members’ original research and broad-based education related to science, technology and economic performance.

Yimon Aye

Article

Aye, Shepherd win Young Investigator awards from Navy

Cornell assistant professors Yimon Aye and Robert Shepherd are among 33 scientists selected from among 360 applicants to receive Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Program (YIP) awards, which support early-career academic scientists and engineers.

Kurt Gottfried

Article

Gottfried receives 2016 Scientific Freedom and Responsibility Award

Kurt Gottfried, emeritus professor of physics and a recognized expert on nuclear arms control, has been awarded the 2016 Scientific Freedom and Responsibility Award from the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). 

Yimon Aye

Article

Group uses its own 'toolset' to probe chemical responses

Using a novel chemical procedure developed in her lab, Yimon Aye and her group are helping to blaze a trail in the emerging field of precision medicine by targeting and modulating single proteins to achieve desired responses.

Decoration

Article

Microscope becomes gauge to measure forces within crystals

All materials found in nature – even the most “perfect” diamond – contain defects, since the atoms inside them are never arranged in perfect order.

Such structural disorder causes complex force distributions throughout the material. Measuring these forces is critical to understanding the material’s behavior, but these force measurements have been impossible to perform through conventional techniques, which only determine average responses to stress.

students doing research in lab

Article

Ultrashort cell-free DNA reveals health of organ transplants

When cells die, whether through apoptosis or necrosis, the DNA and other molecules found in those cells don’t just disappear. They wind up in the blood stream, where degraded bits and pieces can be extracted.

Decoration

Article

Graphene used as a frequency mixer in Cornell-led research

A professor, a postdoctoral researcher and a graduate student hop onto a trampoline.

Hening Lin

Article

Mutant enzyme study aids in understanding of sirtuin's functions

The enzyme sirtuin 6, or SIRT6, serves many key biological functions in regulating genome stability, DNA repair, metabolism and longevity, but how its multiple enzyme activities relate to its various functions is poorly understood.

Article

A&S Merrill scholars honor teachers

Jason Lefkovitz invited his high school history teacher, David Miles, to join him at the 28th annual Merrill Presidential Scholars Convocation luncheon.

He also invited Ronald Ehrenberg, the Irving M. Ives Professor of Industrial and Labor Relations and Economics, as each of the 33 Merrill scholars was asked to bring to the event two teachers who have made a great impact on their lives, academic and otherwise. Nine of the scholars are Arts & Sciences students.

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Article

Electrical properties of superconductor altered by 'stretching'

In the early 1970s, in the basement of Clark Hall, the Cornell team of professors David Lee and Robert Richardson, along with then-graduate student Douglas Osheroff, first observed superfluid helium-3. For that breakthrough, the catalyst for further research into low-temperature physics, the trio was awarded the 1996 Nobel Prize in physics.

Honeybee on flower

Article

'Following The Wild Bees' a how-to for honeybee hunting

Once a popular pastime, bee hunting involves capturing and feeding wild bees, then releasing and following them back to their hive.

The practice is little-known today, but bee expert Thomas D. Seeley – the Horace White Professor in Biology in the College of Arts and Sciences and author of several books on honeybees – has just published a book that offers insights into the history and science of bee hunting.

Hening Lin

Article

Cornell-Swiss study reveals a 'sirtuin' way to a healthy heart

Cornell researchers, working in collaboration with scientists in Switzerland, have identified a strong connection between a protein, SIRT5, and healthy heart function. 

Illustration in chemistry textbook

Article

Four in Class of 2017 win Barry Goldwater Scholarships

A&S student Shivansh Chawla from the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology is researching the biochemistry underpinning diseases.

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Article

'Sticky waves': Molecular interactions at the nanoscale

Like the gravitational forces that are responsible for the attraction between the Earth and the moon, as well as the dynamics of the entire solar system, there exist attractive forces between objects at the nanoscale.

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Article

Quantum dot solids: This generation's silicon wafer?

Just as the single-crystal silicon wafer forever changed the nature of electronics 60 years ago, a group of Cornell researchers is hoping its work with quantum dot solids – crystals made out of crystals – can help usher in a new era in electronics.

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Article

Researcher's chiral graphene stacks break new ground

Hands and feet are two examples of chiral objects – non-superimposable mirror images of each other. One image is distinctly “left-handed,” while the other is “right-handed.” A simple drinking glass and a ball are achiral, meaning the object and its mirror image look exactly the same.

Yimon Aye (left) and David Mimno (right)

Article

Aye, Mimno receive Sloan Foundation Fellowships

Cornell assistant professors Yimon Aye and David Mimno have been named recipients of fellowships from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, which supports early career faculty members’ original research and broad-based education related to science, technology and economic performance.

Biology professor "Chip" Aquadro

Article

Aquadro, Harrington, Nicholson win Weiss fellowships

Biology professor "Chip" Aquadro was honored for teaching and mentoring undergrads.

A team of chemistry, physics and engineering researchers

Article

First self-assembled superconductor structure created

A team of chemistry, physics and engineering researchers has created a self-assembled, three-dimensional gyroidal superconductor.

Polymer diagram

Article

Polymer breakthrough could revolutionize water purification

A team of Cornell researchers has invented a material that could revolutionize the water-purification industry.