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Book cover: Up from the Depths

Article

How Herman Melville can help us cope with dark times

Aaron Sachs’ new book, “Up from the Depths: Herman Melville, Lewis Mumford, and Rediscovery in Dark Times,” tells the interconnected stories of two important American writers, arguing that they show us how history can offer hope.
World map, color coded

Article

Self-fulfilling rankings boost agencies’ power, influence

Cornell researchers developed a theoretical model that suggests an explanation for ratings produced by firms like Standard & Poor’s, Moody’s and Fitch, or the World Bank.
Mother holding baby, leaning her forehead against the baby's forehead. Both are smiling.

Article

After ‘mama,’ children’s first words include ‘this’ and ‘that’

A new Cornell study by Klarman Fellow Amalia Skilton is the largest ever, by sample size, of early vocabulary development in an Indigenous language.
People stand in a half circle in a sunny outdoor plaza

Article

Experts: Ukraine war puts world in ‘uncharted territory’

Clarity about the goals of sanctions against Russia will be key to attempts to de-escalate the conflict, Cornell faculty experts said during a March 4 panel discussion.
Apartment building on a gloomy street

Article

Tenant groups build power in marginalized communities

Scholars have overlooked tenant organizations as a crucial source of political power in the most precarious communities, according to new research co-authored by Jamila Michener.
Book cover: The Language Game

Article

Why language is like charades – and could save us from AI

Language emerges from a continual flow of creative improvisation, not biologically evolved genes or instincts, argue authors of a new book.
Child drinking water from a glass

Article

Water crisis increased Flint children’s lead exposure

As many as one in four children in Flint, Michigan – far above the national average – may have experienced elevated blood lead levels after the city’s 2014 water crisis, finds new research by Jerel Ezell, assistant professor in the Africana Studies and Research Center.
Person walking past a wall painted with many faces

Article

Fear of majority-minority changes perceptions of race

The threat of demographic change may alter who white Americans perceive as racial minorities, potentially making more people vulnerable to discrimination, suggests new Cornell psychology research.
book cover

Article

How to transform neighborhoods without destroying them

"In the wealthiest country on earth, can it possibly be that low-income residents only get to live in wretched places?"
Maserati in front of elaborate house with fountain and sculpture in courtyard

Article

Lavish wealth tolerated more for individuals than groups

Driving the effect, the researchers propose, is our tendency to see internal traits as more responsible for individual successes and failures than for group outcomes.
 Goldwin Smith Hall

Article

Weiss teaching awards honor 10 exceptional faculty

Three A&S faculty members have been selected to receive Stephen H. Weiss Awards honoring excellence in undergraduate teaching and mentoring, President Martha E. Pollack announced Oct. 18.
 New York City

Article

Center links economy and society to study changing world

The development of regional knowledge economies is one of several primary areas of research focus for the center’s Economic Sociology Lab, supported by graduate researchers and undergraduate assistants.
Dean Colleen Barry with microphone in hand, speaking at podiumSchool of Public Policy

Article

Decades in making, public policy school now a reality

The Cornell Jeb E. Brooks School of Public Policy creates a home for policy-oriented faculty to study and teach, and for students to learn, about effective, thoughtful policymaking, analysis and management.
Two mice perched on flowers and facing each other

Article

Lonely mice more vocal, more social after isolation

Female mice exhibit a strong drive to socialize with other females following periods of acute isolation.
book cover

Article

How moviemaking evolved to draw us in

James Cutting, the Susan Linn Sage Professor of Psychology Emeritus in the College of Arts and Sciences, has a new book, “Movies on Our Minds: The Evolution of Cinematic Engagement,” published Aug. 24
Kaushik Basu wearing a tweed jacket with hand upraised as he delivers a talk.

Article

Dear diary: Basu shares notes from policymaking’s front lines

Prof. Kaushik Basu's new book recounts his experiences in government, as India's chief economist and as senior vice president at the World Bank.
Family gathering for a group hug

Article

Religious have fewer children in secular countries

The study reveals that “societal secularism” is a better predictor of fertility rates than surveys of individuals’ religiosity or secularism.
Wedding bouquet and rings

Article

Choose wisely: Spouses consolidate resources in families

In consolidating multiple types of resources, married partners deal themselves and their children better hands with long-term payoffs, but the process may amplify inequality across generations.
People placing their hands together in a circle

Article

Following the ‘wisdom of crowds’ can stifle diversity

People who believe there is a single right answer to a question are better at coordinating with others, but that benefit may come at the expense of a diversity of opinions.
Book cover: Hijacking the Agenda

Article

Money talks: Wealthy ‘hijack’ agenda to gain policy influence

Analyzing more than 20 years of floor speeches by members of Congress, a new book co-authored by Peter K. Enns, professor in the Department of Government, explains why corporate and wealthy interests dominate the national economic agenda.
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