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Byline: James Dean

Six people stand in a group at the front of a classroom, conversing

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Breaking barriers: Peer outreach boosts student veterans

The number of undergraduate veterans enrolled at Cornell has nearly quadrupled over the past five years, thanks in part to outreach by a team of student veteran peer counselors.
Peter Enns

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Cornell-led election survey seeks to improve science of polls

The survey boasts a sample size 20 times larger than most nationally representative surveys.
Red flag against a white sky

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People over numbers: Book charts China’s neopolitical turn

Jeremy Lee Wallace explains how a few numbers came to define Chinese politics “until they did not count what mattered and what they counted did not measure up,” and the “stunning about-face” led by Xi Jinping within the Chinese Communist Party.
book cover: Contemporary State Building

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How security crises can spur state-building in Latin America

Gustavo Flores-Macías analyzes key factors of public safety across Latin America in his new book.
Two people stand in front of a pond surrounded by woods

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Outreach supports Black rural landowners in Northeast

Supported by a grant from the College of Arts and Sciences' Rural Humanities initiative through an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation award, a 30-page publication highlights the stories of five Black owners of forestland in Massachusetts, New York, New Hampshire and Vermont
Two people smile, discovering a piece of scientific equipment

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Academic boot camp boosts veterans’ higher ed mission

Professors in physics and classics contributed to the Warrior-Scholar Project (WSP) hosted at Cornell for military veterans July 23 to Aug. 6.
metal sculpture of a figure blindfolded and holding scales

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Courts, not amendments, best route for constitutional reform

Since the mid-20th century, Congress has repurposed Article V of the U.S. Constitution from a tool for constitutional reform into a mechanism for taking positions on issues, according to research by David A. Bateman.
Book cover: Up from the Depths

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How Herman Melville can help us cope with dark times

Prof. Aaron Sachs’ new book tells the stories of two American writers, who he says show us how history can offer hope.
World map, color coded

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Self-fulfilling rankings boost agencies’ power, influence

Cornell researchers developed a theoretical model that suggests an explanation for ratings produced by firms like Standard & Poor’s, Moody’s and Fitch, or the World Bank.
Mother holding baby, leaning her forehead against the baby's forehead. Both are smiling.

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After ‘mama,’ children’s first words include ‘this’ and ‘that’

A new Cornell study by Klarman Fellow Amalia Skilton is the largest ever, by sample size, of early vocabulary development in an Indigenous language.
People stand in a half circle in a sunny outdoor plaza

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Experts: Ukraine war puts world in ‘uncharted territory’

Clarity about the goals of sanctions against Russia will be key to attempts to de-escalate the conflict, Cornell faculty experts said during a March 4 panel discussion.
Apartment building on a gloomy street

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Tenant groups build power in marginalized communities

Scholars have overlooked tenant organizations as a crucial source of political power in the most precarious communities, according to new research co-authored by Jamila Michener.
Book cover: The Language Game

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Why language is like charades – and could save us from AI

Language emerges from a continual flow of creative improvisation, not biologically evolved genes or instincts, argue authors of a new book.
Child drinking water from a glass

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Water crisis increased Flint children’s lead exposure

As many as one in four children in Flint, Michigan – far above the national average – may have experienced elevated blood lead levels after the city’s 2014 water crisis, finds new research by Jerel Ezell, assistant professor in the Africana Studies and Research Center.
Person walking past a wall painted with many faces

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Fear of majority-minority changes perceptions of race

The threat of demographic change may alter who white Americans perceive as racial minorities, potentially making more people vulnerable to discrimination, suggests new Cornell psychology research.
book cover

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How to transform neighborhoods without destroying them

"In the wealthiest country on earth, can it possibly be that low-income residents only get to live in wretched places?"
Maserati in front of elaborate house with fountain and sculpture in courtyard

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Lavish wealth tolerated more for individuals than groups

Driving the effect, the researchers propose, is our tendency to see internal traits as more responsible for individual successes and failures than for group outcomes.
Goldwin Smith Hall

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Weiss teaching awards honor 10 exceptional faculty

Three A&S faculty members have been selected to receive Stephen H. Weiss Awards honoring excellence in undergraduate teaching and mentoring, President Martha E. Pollack announced Oct. 18.
New York City

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Center links economy and society to study changing world

The development of regional knowledge economies is one of several primary areas of research focus for the center’s Economic Sociology Lab, supported by graduate researchers and undergraduate assistants.
Dean Colleen Barry with microphone in hand, speaking at podiumSchool of Public Policy

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Decades in making, public policy school now a reality

The Cornell Jeb E. Brooks School of Public Policy creates a home for policy-oriented faculty to study and teach, and for students to learn, about effective, thoughtful policymaking, analysis and management.
Two mice perched on flowers and facing each other

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Lonely mice more vocal, more social after isolation

Female mice exhibit a strong drive to socialize with other females following periods of acute isolation.
book cover

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How moviemaking evolved to draw us in

James Cutting, the Susan Linn Sage Professor of Psychology Emeritus in the College of Arts and Sciences, has a new book, “Movies on Our Minds: The Evolution of Cinematic Engagement,” published Aug. 24
Kaushik Basu wearing a tweed jacket with hand upraised as he delivers a talk.

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Dear diary: Basu shares notes from policymaking’s front lines

Prof. Kaushik Basu's new book recounts his experiences in government, as India's chief economist and as senior vice president at the World Bank.
Family gathering for a group hug

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Religious have fewer children in secular countries

The study reveals that “societal secularism” is a better predictor of fertility rates than surveys of individuals’ religiosity or secularism.
Wedding bouquet and rings

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Choose wisely: Spouses consolidate resources in families

In consolidating multiple types of resources, married partners deal themselves and their children better hands with long-term payoffs, but the process may amplify inequality across generations.
People placing their hands together in a circle

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Following the ‘wisdom of crowds’ can stifle diversity

People who believe there is a single right answer to a question are better at coordinating with others, but that benefit may come at the expense of a diversity of opinions.
Book cover: Hijacking the Agenda

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Money talks: Wealthy ‘hijack’ agenda to gain policy influence

Analyzing more than 20 years of floor speeches by members of Congress, a new book co-authored by Peter K. Enns, professor in the Department of Government, explains why corporate and wealthy interests dominate the national economic agenda.
Map in yellow, green and pink sections

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Report: Ithaca economy shouldn’t return to business as usual

Economist Michèle Belot and the ILR School’s Ithaca Co-Lab recommend workforce strategies to reduce racial disparities, remove barriers to work and prioritize living-wage jobs.
Colleen Barry

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Colleen Barry named inaugural dean of public policy school

Colleen L. Barry, a professor and department chair at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, has been named the Cornell Jeb E. Brooks School of Public Policy’s first dean, effective Sept. 15.
McGraw Tower seen behind a small hill

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Gift endows, names Cornell Jeb E. Brooks School of Public Policy

The major gift from the Brooks family, whose Cornell roots span three generations, provides an early boost to help the university’s newest school achieve world-class excellence.
Person wearing a business suit

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Face value? Attractiveness biases financial decisions

Vivian Zayas, associate professor of psychology, found attractive investment partners were seen as more trustworthy even if they weren’t the most profitable.
bottles labeled 'coronavirus vaccine'

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Skipping the second shot could prolong pandemic, study finds

New Cornell research shows many Americans remain confused about when COVID-19 vaccines provide strong protection.
View between two library shelves full of books

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Grants advance social sciences research, collaboration

The Cornell Center for Social Sciences has awarded spring grants supporting research and conferences involving more than 30 faculty and researchers across campus, including collaborations within new and expanded superdepartments.
Water faucet

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Water crisis took toll on Flint adults’ physical, mental health

“If you don’t trust your water and you actively avoid it over persistent concerns on its safety, that’s a stark form of psychological trauma in and of itself.”
Person hunching fearfully over a computer

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Fear year: Pandemic politics made us anxious, but hardly safer

According to new research by government professor Uriel Abelof, the past year has seen a dramatic rise in existential fear, with people around the world thinking about death twice as often as before.
Donuts decorated with fruit and flowers

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Sweet rewards valued more, may contribute to obesity

Next time you reward a child with a treat, consider offering nuts instead of candy, a Cornell economist suggests.
Face on computer screen of President Bill Clinton
Jason Koski/Cornell University Former President Bill Clinton speaks March 18 during the first event in the Milstein State of Democracy Address series.

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President Clinton: U.S. in ‘dogfight’ for democracy

During a March 18 webinar on the state of American democracy hosted by the Institute of Politics and Global Affairs (IOPGA), former President Bill Clinton challenged more than 3,600 students and other viewers to stand up for democratic norms including voting rights.
campus buildings with lake in background

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Search committee set for policy school’s founding dean

The university has launched a search for the founding dean of the School of Public Policy, building excitement about the fledgling school that could formally start operations as soon as this fall.
campus buildings with lake in background

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Center for Social Sciences announces 2021-22 faculty fellows

Political polarization, environmental justice and inclusion in higher education are a few of big issues faculty members—including several from the College of Arts and Sciences—will tackle in the next academic year as fellows at the Cornell Center for Social Sciences (CCSS).
Students, sitting far apart, meet for class in Milstein Hall
Jason Koski/Cornell University

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Pandemic reshaped ‘small world’ campus networks

Through courses alone, more than 90% of students were linked by three or fewer degrees of separation.
Grand building, blue skuy

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Perceived erosion of democracy spawns new campaign

During his 16 years representing a Long Island district in Congress, Steve Israel said he saw divisiveness and partisanship grow exponentially. By the time he retired from the House of Representatives in 2017, compromise and respect for democratic norms seemed almost irrelevant, he said, and his biggest fear was not of foreign conflict but internal division.

Scale and gavel on a desk

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Migrations initiative wins $5M Mellon grant for racial justice

Migrations: A Global Grand Challenge, part of Global Cornell, has won a three-year, $5 million grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation’s Just Futures Initiative that will bring together scholars across the university and beyond to study the links between racism, dispossession and migration.
Journals on shelves in front of a window

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Center’s grants seed diverse research in the social sciences

How do perceptions of luck shape views about inequality and redistribution? Could interventions nudge hiring managers to evaluate job candidates blindly, and thus more objectively? Has remote instruction during the pandemic improved student interactions and equity in science labs?

Person in a long hallway

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Cornell team seeks mercy for Lisa Montgomery

A team of Cornell faculty, graduate students and undergraduates is fighting to save Lisa Montgomery from federal execution next month, supporting her bid for clemency from courtrooms to recording studios to a social media campaign urging followers to #SaveLisa and consider #HerWholeTruth.

candle and flame

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Micky Falkson, senior lecturer in economics, dies at 83

Micky Falkson, a senior lecturer in the Department of Economics and one of its longest-serving faculty members, died at home in Ithaca Nov. 7. He was 83.

Mail in ballot envelop and face masks

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Student poll found voters anxious about election

Of respondents, 53.5% said they felt fearful about America's future.
plastic viles being filled with vaccine in a machine

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Efficacy, politics influence public trust in COVID-19 vaccine

If an initial COVID-19 vaccine is about as effective as a flu shot, uptake by the American public may fall far short of the 70% level needed to achieve herd immunity, new Cornell research suggests.

candle and flame

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Michael Morley, emeritus professor of math, dies at 90

Michael D. Morley, professor emeritus of mathematics in the College of Arts and Sciences (A&S), died Oct. 11 at Guthrie Robert Packer Hospital in Sayre, Pennsylvania. He was 90.

Screen shot showing ten people

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Site empowering student voters wins ‘Pitch for the People’

In the 2016 presidential election, stronger turnout among college students could have flipped the outcomes in several states that were decided by razor-thin margins.

Red dots on a dark map

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Experts: Acknowledge uncertainty in COVID communication

The researchers examined how politicians’ rhetoric and media framing affected support for using COVID-19 models to guide policies.
Screen shot showing six people

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Policing, incarceration examined in racism webinar debut

The Racism in America series will resume in November with a focus on residential and educational segregation.
test image

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Policing, incarceration examined in racism webinar debut

When armed white militia members stormed Michigan’s state capitol in May, they were treated as peaceful protestors of a coronavirus stay-at-home order. Yet reports of excessive violence against Black Americans – including the police killings of George Floyd in Minneapolis and Breonna Taylor in Louisville – have become almost routine.
A frog

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Lost frogs rediscovered with environmental DNA

Scientists have detected signs of a frog listed extinct and not seen since 1968, using an innovative technique to locate declining and missing species in two regions of Brazil.
Two people setting up a tent

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Peer pressure: Students promote culture of responsibility

From her COVID-19 supply tent in front of the Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts in Collegetown on a recent morning, Bianca Santos-Declet ’23 invited passersby to grab a free face mask, bottle of hand sanitizer or touchless stylus tool.

Infographic: concentric circles with a blue box in the center

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World Economic Forum features history professor’s analysis

Governments and businesses should strive to limit the use of economic sanctions, which have increased dramatically since the 1970s, advises Nicholas Mulder, assistant professor of history in the College of Arts and Sciences.

Book cover: The Myth of the Imperial Presidency

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Book casts doubt on notion of ‘imperial presidency’

Even Trump has backpedaled from numerous policies in the face of public backlash, the authors say.
Two people in a screen shot

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Panel: Pandemic has exposed long-standing health inequities

Scholars discussed the deep roots of health inequalities in the U.S. during a webinar, “Systemic Racism and Health Equity,” moderated by Jamila Michener, associate professor of government.
Person holding a sign

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Roper Center collection remembers, amplifies Black voices

In 1946, the Minneapolis Tribune’s Minnesota Poll billed itself as “an impartial, scientific weekly survey of what Minnesotans think on leading topics of the day.”

A student sits on a grassy hill near a tree turned orange by autumn

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After fall decision, focus shifts to implementation

The decision to reactivate Cornell’s Ithaca campus for residential instruction this fall was a difficult one. Now comes the even harder work of making it happen.

One student walks through a campus plaza

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Cornell plans to reactivate Ithaca campus for fall semester

Fall classes will start Sept. 2 and most students will return home before Thanksgiving break.
Person speaking on screen

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Panel: Protests ‘a defining moment’ in quest for racial justice

Weeks of protests across the nation, signs supporting Black Lives Matter in more conservative neighborhoods, and reforms enacted since George Floyd’s death in Minneapolis all signal “a defining moment” and an opportunity for systemic change, four black lawmakers said June 15 during a Cornell-sponsored forum.

House, grass, sidewalk

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Place doesn’t beat race as predictor of incarceration

“There’s a systemic and a deep inequality in American society."
Campus buildings with lake in the backgroup

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A&S faculty paving way for policy school, superdepartments

The major initiatives will enhance the social sciences at Cornell.
Cornell's central campus with lake beyond

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Center advances social sciences research with spring grants

Why has implicit bias persisted as self-reported attitudes have grown more tolerant? What are the consequences when owners of mobile platforms like Apple’s App Store compete in their own marketplaces? Could pretending to be a scientist help young girls overcome gender stereotypes about scientists?

Two people walking, wearing masks

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Social sciences center awards COVID-19 grants

As the coronavirus pandemic escalated in the United States, reports of bias and hostility against immigrants and Asian Americans also grew.

New research supported by a rapid response grant from the Cornell Center for Social Sciences (CCSS) will study public attitudes about COVID-19 across the country and whether they are linked to increased social bias regionally or nationally.

Brown gavel on white background

Article

Judges who’ve served with women more likely to hire women

The findings suggest diversity at a profession’s highest levels may open doors for underrepresented groups at entry levels, potentially helping to reduce discrimination.
Beer bottle and glass by a computer

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Alum’s ‘crazy idea’ helped launch craft beer revolution

“I think I failed as an English teacher, but it turned out I was a pretty good beer teacher.”
Raven Schwam-Curtis ’20

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Access Fund eased pandemic’s burden on students

Raven Schwam-Curtis ’20 had seen the coronavirus coming: She visited China and South Korea on a research trip over winter break, when the first cases were being reported there.

But she was still confronted with financial and emotional disruption when the pandemic forced Cornell to abruptly suspend classes in mid-March and switch to remote learning April 6, following spring break.

Computer showing five people

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Problem Solvers Caucus strives to lead pandemic response

A bipartisan group of lawmakers hopes to shape Congress’ response to the COVID-19 pandemic and encourage a less divisive – and more productive – climate in Washington, a pair of members said during a Cornell forum April 23.

Christian icon depicting five people

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Classics scholar awarded Guggenheim fellowship

Eric Rebillard, the Avalon Foundation Professor of the Humanities in the Department of Classics, in the College of Arts and Sciences, has been named a 2020 fellow by the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation.

A historian of early Christianity and late antiquity, Rebillard is one of 175 writers, artists, scholars and scientists awarded the Guggenheim fellowship this year, selected from nearly 3,000 applicants.

Two women students talking

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Cornellians rally to support each other during transition

"Everyone is just coming together right now."
campus buildings with lake in background

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Center for Social Sciences names 2020-21 faculty fellows

Climate change, school segregation and online interaction are among the topics to be investigated by the Cornell Center for Social Sciences’ newest group of faculty fellows.

Provost Michael I. Kotlikoff

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Provost announces School of Public Policy, superdepartments

Concluding a multiyear review, Provost Michael I. Kotlikoff has announced a pair of initiatives intended to chart the future of social sciences scholarship and education at Cornell.

The university will launch the Cornell School of Public Policy, a separate school with its own dean who will report to the provost. In addition, “superdepartments” drawing faculty from multiple colleges or schools will be created or expanded in the disciplines of economics, psychology and sociology.

Peter Enns
Peter K. Enns, the Robert S. Harrison Director of the Cornell Center for Social Sciences, Executive Director of the Roper Center for Public Opinion Research and professor of government

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Roper Center gives voice to American public opinion

With voting to select this year’s presidential nominees in full swing, the Roper Center for Public Opinion Research at Cornell has launched a series of initiatives to help inform citizens and journalists and support the democratic process.

Their goal: to bring public opinion back to the public.

Voting sticker help up by a smiling person

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Cornell professor, pollster taking pulse of Latino voters

Univision last year tapped Sergio Garcia-Rios as director of polling throughout the presidential campaign.
Medication

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Hospitality, not medical care, key to patient satisfaction

Would you choose a hospital based on its Yelp reviews?

Relying on hospitals’ patient satisfaction scores as a guide amounts to much the same thing, according to new Cornell research.

Arts Quad in summer

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Grants seed social science research, conferences

Studies exploring the effects of disadvantaged neighborhoods, a reimagined school recess and customized avatars were among a slate of faculty projects receiving grants this fall from the Cornell Center for Social Sciences (CCSS).
A pile of dollar bills.

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Economic scarcity shifts perception, leads to discrimination

“Scarcity mindsets can really exacerbate discrimination,” said Amy Krosch, assistant professor of psychology
Adam Schiff

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Adam Schiff discusses impeachment inquiry, national security

Around the globe and from within, the nation now faces the most vigorous challenge to the idea of liberal democracy since World War II, U.S. Rep. Adam Schiff said during an Oct. 10 visit to Cornell.

broken window

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Kids from tough neighborhoods more likely to become obese as adults

Children growing up in disadvantaged neighborhoods are nearly one-third more likely to experience obesity as adults, new Cornell research has found. 

NY stock exchange

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Book traces rise of 'free enterprise' as cornerstone of conservatism

Might today's political rhetoric signal an end to the modern era of free enterprise?