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man looking at a piece of charcoal

Article

New timeline clarifies Indigenous history in Mohawk Valley

A collaboration between the Cornell Tree-Ring Laboratory and the New York State Museum in Albany has established a more precise timeline for some of the most iconic archeological sites in the Mohawk Valley.
book cover

Article

Book explores Nigerian women’s political activism

"The Great Upheaval: Women and Nation in Postwar Nigeria,” explores the years immediately following World War II, which were pivotal for women in Nigeria.
album cover

Article

Concerto highlights individual voice and the sound of community

“The Oberlin Concertos,” released Sept. 17, features a composition by Elizabeth Ogonek, which combines voice, piano and percussion.
Lab beakers, one partly filled with liquid

Article

Chemistry professor helped catalyze Nobel-winning breakthrough

A small contribution from chemistry Professor Tristan Lambert when he was a doctoral student helped catalyze the breakthrough in catalysis that led to the 2021 Nobel Prize in chemistry.
Juliana Hu Pegues

Article

Book explores connections of Alaska’s Native and Asian peoples

Juliana Hu Pegues often heard stories of Asian immigrants as she was growing up, but they never made it into the history books.
whale coming out of water

Article

Project celebrates the beauty of humpback whale songs

“The Whale Listening Project,” which runs Sept. 23-26, is a four-day immersion in the beauty of whale song and a celebration of the 50th anniversary of the best-selling 1970 album, “Songs of the Humpback Whale,” co-produced by pioneering bioacoustics researchers Roger Payne, Ph.D. ’61, and Katy Payne ’59, a retired research associate with the Cornell Lab of Ornithology’s Bioacoustics Research Program.
Colored three-dimensional scan of the hands and footprints

Article

Hand and footprint art dates to mid-Ice Age

To answer whether this could be the oldest art ever found, the team turned to A&S research scientist Thomas Urban.
 Workers walking with a solar panel

Article

Scientists harness machine learning to lower solar energy cost

A Cornell-led collaboration received a $3 million grant from the U.S. Department of Energy to use machine learning to accelerate the creation of low-cost materials for solar energy.
bubble wrap

Article

Polymer enables tougher recyclable thermoplastics

The resulting thermoplastic is strong and flexible enough to be used for large-scale applications such as packaging products.
James Bramble

Article

Mathematician James H. Bramble dies at 90

James H. Bramble, professor emeritus of mathematics in the College of Arts and Sciences, died July 20 at his home in Austin, Texas. He was 90.
 Roberto Sierra

Article

Sierra symphony highlights Caribbean culture

The Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra will launch its 2021-22 season on Oct. 14 with the world premiere of “Symphony No. 6,” composed by Roberto Sierra, the Old Dominion Foundation Professor in the Humanities in the College of Arts and Sciences.
Cover art for "The Queer Nuyorican"

Article

Book explores historical queerness of the Nuyorican Poets Cafe

“What’s really interesting about the space and these artists is that there is a queerness that has always been at the cafe, but that has never been used to frame the space.”
Beams of light

Article

Chaotic electrons heed ‘limit’ in strange metals

"We are finally unlocking the enigma behind the intense motions of electrons in strange metals.”
Mukoma Wa Ngugi

Article

From Kenya to Cornell, writer Mukoma ranges across genres

Mukoma Wa Ngugi channeled his fascination with Ethiopian "Tizita" songs into his fourth novel, “Unbury Our Dead With Song,” which will be published Sept. 21.
Graphic featuring yellow, red and blue balls

Article

Small molecule plays outsize role in controlling nanoparticle

A breakthrough imaging technique enabled Cornell researchers to gain new insights into how tiny ligands adsorb on the surface of nanoparticles and how they can tune a particle’s shape.
a colorful orb

Article

Machine learning tool sorts the nuances of quantum data

An interdisciplinary team of Cornell and Harvard University researchers developed a machine learning tool to parse quantum matter and make crucial distinctions in the data, an approach that will help scientists unravel the most confounding phenomena in the subatomic realm.
Drawing of a black and red zigzag line
Provided This schematic illustration shows the structure of a conjugated polymer, which is essentially a series of clustered molecules strung along a backbone that can conduct electrons and absorb light.

Article

Magnetic tweezers reveal polymers’ hidden properties

Cornell researchers were able to stretch and twist individual molecules of a conjugated polymer and measure its mechanical and kinetic properties, gaining insights that could eventually lead to more flexible and robust soft electronic materials.
Illustration of blue and grey balls layered over blue diamonds and yellow balls
Provided A Cornell team sought to explore the properties of monolayer iron selenide because, as a high-temperature superconductor, it has the potential to help researchers create novel electrical devices that conduct with zero resistance and, therefore, much greater efficiency.

Article

Monolayer superconductor exhibits unusual behavior

Cornell researchers have discovered a rare “pseudogap” phenomenon that helps explain how the superconducting transition temperature can be greatly boosted in a single monolayer of iron selenide, and how it might be applied to other superconducting materials.
wooden structure set into the ground
Ministry of Culture - Italy The Noceto Vasca Votiva’s lower and upper tanks, dated to 1444 and 1432 B.C., respectively.

Article

Researchers link ancient wooden structure to water ritual

Cornell researchers used dendrochronology and a form of radiocarbon dating to identify the ancient origins of the structure in Northern Italy.
Blue and green abstract image

Article

Superfluid reacts strangely under pressure change

A Cornell-led collaboration identified an unusual behavior of superfluid helium-3 when it undergoes a phase transition between two different superfluid states – a transition that theoretically shouldn’t happen reliably.
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