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Byline: David Nutt

Magnified image shows an arrow-shaped embryo, glowing red, yellow and purple at the edges, appearing to give off red smoke

Article

Cornell chemists contributed to Nobel Prize-winning work

Jeremy M. Baskin and Pamela Chang were doctoral students in Carolyn Bertozzi’s lab at the University of California, Berkley, in the mid-2000s.
Two people wearing gloves work with football-sized museum object

Article

Mummified bird gets second life in multisensory exhibition

“A Tale of Two Mummies: Multisensory Experience” runs Oct. 7-9, from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., in Upson Hall’s Lounge 116.
Book cover: State of Disaster

Article

Book: Policymakers are failing ‘climate refugees’

The United States must transform its outdated migration policies to address the human devastation that is left in the wake of climate change and environmental catastrophe, Maria Cristina Garcia argues.
Illustration of a blocky silver robot

Article

Brains on board: Smart microrobots walk autonomously

Electronic “brains” on solar-powered robots that are smaller than an ant’s head allow them to walk by themselves.
Red cliffs reaching down to blue ocean; a city of white buildings appears small

Article

Statistical analysis aims to solve Greek volcano mystery

Sturt Manning has zeroed in on a much narrower range of dates, approximately 1609–1560 BCE, for the eruption on Santorini, a pivotal event in the prehistory of the region.
Ancient stone building with a spire and foliage growing on the roof

Article

Report shows near-total erasure of Armenian heritage sites

The study compiled decades of high-resolution satellite imagery from the Nakhchivan Autonomous Republic of Azerbaijan.
James Turner, the founding director of Cornell’s Africana Studies and Research Center and a a professor emeritus of African and African American Politics and Social Policy in the College of Arts and Sciences,

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James Turner, a ‘giant’ of Africana studies, dies at 82

James Turner, the founding director of Cornell’s Africana Studies and Research Center and a pioneer of the multidisciplinary approach to exploring the African diaspora, died Aug. 6 in Ithaca.
Book cover: Sonorous Desert

Article

Desert sounds offer lessons in solitude and community

In a new book, Kim Haines-Eitzen explores the rich range of desert sounds and what they can teach us about place, the past, solitude and community.
Book cover: Adventure Capitalism

Article

Think twice before founding that free-market utopia

In a new book, Raymond Craib writes that libertarian attempts to escape regulation and build communities structured entirely through market transactions often have calamitous consequences for local populations.
Wei Wang, in a blue shirt and black plastic-framed glasses, sits in a lab looking at an instrument while he adjusts another instrument with his right hand.

Article

Artificial cilia could someday power diagnostic devices

The technology could enable low-cost, portable diagnostic devices for testing blood samples, manipulating cells or assisting in microfabrication processes.
The sun shining over a field next to a powerplant spewing huge clouds into the air.

Article

Spongy material captures carbon dioxide in cavities

The materials are made from sugar and low-cost alkali metal salts, so they would be inexpensive enough for large-scale deployment.
Stop motion images of a dragonfly turning over in flight

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Dragonflies use vision, subtle wing control to straighten up and fly right

As one of the oldest insect species on the planet, dragonflies are an early innovator of aerial flight.
Shiny spikes organized into a sphere

Article

Mechanism ‘splits’ electron spins in magnetic material

Cornell researchers have discovered a technique that could eventually lead to the development of more energy-efficient magnetic memory devices.
Spots of orange light against a dark background

Article

Light-infused particles go the distance in organic semiconductors

Prof. Andrew Musser and his team have found a way to tune the speed of polaritons' energy flow, using an approach that could eventually lead to more efficient solar cells, sensors and LEDs.
A.R. Ammons

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‘Ammons & the Falls’ highlights poet’s ties to Ithaca landscape

The April 26 celebration will include the unveiling of a new display of Ammons’ poem “Triphammer Bridge," a screening of an episode of “Poetry in America," and more.
Circular logo that says John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation around the outside and 1925 on the inside

Article

Musicologist and poet awarded Guggenheim fellowships

Alejandro L. Madrid, professor and chair of music, and Valzhyna Mort, associate professor of literatures in English, were honored as fellows.
Three people look at an artifact on a lab table

Article

Cross-college researchers unravel mummy bird mystery

What began as a passion project for a master’s student in archaeology, has become a cross-campus fascination that encompasses everything from ancient burial rituals to the lost history of donated artifacts, the totemic power of animals, and even Egyptian beer.
Book cover: The War that Made the Roman Empire

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Historian delves into the battle that shaped the Roman Empire

In his new book, “The War That Made the Roman Empire: Antony, Cleopatra, and Octavian at Actium,” historian Barry Strauss offers a more accurate, nuanced narrative of the conflict and the fascinating personalities at its core.
Orange pill bottle, spilling green pills

Article

Electrosynthesis energizes sustainable drug development

A Cornell-led collaboration used electrochemistry to stitch together simple carbon molecules and form complex compounds, eliminating the need for precious metals or other catalysts to promote the chemical reaction.
Person looks carefully at physics lab equipment

Article

Gender bias in lab groups not rooted in personal preference

The finding shows there is potential for instructional interventions that could correct the gender inequity in physics labs.