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Person looks carefully at physics lab equipment

Article

Gender bias in lab groups not rooted in personal preference

A team led by Natasha Holmes, the Ann S. Bowers Assistant Professor, set out to interview and survey physics undergraduates to see what role their preferences play in the well-documented gender disparities in physics lab courses.
Book cover: The Queerness of Home

Article

Historian delves into LGBTQ life and the American home

The intimacy of domestic space was a crucial aspect of LGBTQ life in the postwar era, according to historian Stephen Vider, who explores that history in his new book, “The Queerness of Home: Gender, Sexuality, and the Politics of Domesticity after World War II.”
Book cover: The Economic Weapon

Article

Economic sanctions evolved into tool of modern war

Economic sanctions have long been considered a nonviolent deterrent, but ironically they have become a tool of modern warfare, according to a new book by Nicholas Mulder, assistant professor of history.
Field of semiconductors

Article

Semiconductor demonstrates elusive quantum physics model

With a little twist and the turn of a voltage knob, Cornell researchers have shown that a single material system can toggle between two of the wildest states in condensed matter physics.
Two squares: one green and pink graph, the other rainbow

Article

3D semiconductor particles offer 2D properties

Cornell researchers have found that 3D semiconductor particles have 2D properties, which can be leveraged for photoelectrochemical processes that boost solar energy conversion technologies.
Campus buildings, cloudy sky, lake

Article

Three Cornellians named Schwarzman Scholars

Shaheer (Shawn) Haq ‘21, Daniel James II ’22 and Xiaochen (Brian) Ren ‘22 were elected to join the seventh cohort of Schwarzman Scholars, a program that nurtures a network of future global leaders.
 Voting sticker help up by a smiling person

Article

Modeling suggests friendships may lead to lopsided elections

Have you ever thought about not voting because your candidate’s victory seems assured? Think again.
 Roberto Sierra

Article

Sierra wins Latin Grammy for guitar sonata

Composer Roberto Sierra won for “Music from Cuba and Spain, Sierra: Sonata para Guitarra.”
Board game with black and white pieces

Article

Weak coupling shows flaw in strange metal model

Planckian metals have the potential to power high-temperature superconductors, quantum computers and a host of other next-generation technologies.
man looking at a piece of charcoal

Article

New timeline clarifies Indigenous history in Mohawk Valley

A collaboration between the Cornell Tree-Ring Laboratory and the New York State Museum in Albany has established a more precise timeline for some of the most iconic archeological sites in the Mohawk Valley.
book cover

Article

Book explores Nigerian women’s political activism

"The Great Upheaval: Women and Nation in Postwar Nigeria,” explores the years immediately following World War II, which were pivotal for women in Nigeria.
album cover

Article

Concerto highlights individual voice and the sound of community

“The Oberlin Concertos,” released Sept. 17, features a composition by Elizabeth Ogonek, which combines voice, piano and percussion.
Lab beakers, one partly filled with liquid

Article

Chemistry professor helped catalyze Nobel-winning breakthrough

A small contribution from chemistry Professor Tristan Lambert when he was a doctoral student helped catalyze the breakthrough in catalysis that led to the 2021 Nobel Prize in chemistry.
Juliana Hu Pegues

Article

Book explores connections of Alaska’s Native and Asian peoples

Juliana Hu Pegues often heard stories of Asian immigrants as she was growing up, but they never made it into the history books.
whale coming out of water

Article

Project celebrates the beauty of humpback whale songs

… ’59, a retired research associate with the Cornell Lab of Ornithology’s Bioacoustics Research Program. That album … from Hawaii and used software developed by the Lab of Ornithology to annotate a 40-minute selection of humpback … ’59, a retired research associate with the Cornell Lab of Ornithology’s Bioacoustics Research Program. … Project …
Colored three-dimensional scan of the hands and footprints

Article

Hand and footprint art dates to mid-Ice Age

To answer whether this could be the oldest art ever found, the team turned to A&S research scientist Thomas Urban.
 Workers walking with a solar panel

Article

Scientists harness machine learning to lower solar energy cost

A Cornell-led collaboration received a $3 million grant from the U.S. Department of Energy to use machine learning to accelerate the creation of low-cost materials for solar energy.
bubble wrap

Article

Polymer enables tougher recyclable thermoplastics

The resulting thermoplastic is strong and flexible enough to be used for large-scale applications such as packaging products.
James Bramble

Article

Mathematician James H. Bramble dies at 90

James H. Bramble, professor emeritus of mathematics in the College of Arts and Sciences, died July 20 at his home in Austin, Texas. He was 90.
 Roberto Sierra

Article

Sierra symphony highlights Caribbean culture

The Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra will launch its 2021-22 season on Oct. 14 with the world premiere of “Symphony No. 6,” composed by Roberto Sierra, the Old Dominion Foundation Professor in the Humanities in the College of Arts and Sciences.
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