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Stop motion images of a dragonfly turning over in flight

Article

Dragonflies use vision, subtle wing control to straighten up and fly right

As one of the oldest insect species on the planet, dragonflies are an early innovator of aerial flight.
Shiny spikes organized into a sphere

Article

Mechanism ‘splits’ electron spins in magnetic material

Cornell researchers have discovered a technique that could eventually lead to the development of more energy-efficient magnetic memory devices.
Spots of orange light against a dark background

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Light-infused particles go the distance in organic semiconductors

Prof. Andrew Musser and his team have found a way to tune the speed of polaritons' energy flow, using an approach that could eventually lead to more efficient solar cells, sensors and LEDs.
A.R. Ammons

Article

‘Ammons & the Falls’ highlights poet’s ties to Ithaca landscape

The April 26 celebration will include the unveiling of a new display of Ammons’ poem “Triphammer Bridge," a screening of an episode of “Poetry in America," and more.
Circular logo that says John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation around the outside and 1925 on the inside

Article

Musicologist and poet awarded Guggenheim fellowships

Alejandro L. Madrid, professor and chair of music, and Valzhyna Mort, associate professor of literatures in English, were honored as fellows.
Three people look at an artifact on a lab table

Article

Cross-college researchers unravel mummy bird mystery

What began as a passion project for a master’s student in archaeology, has become a cross-campus fascination that encompasses everything from ancient burial rituals to the lost history of donated artifacts, the totemic power of animals, and even Egyptian beer.
Book cover: The War that Made the Roman Empire

Article

Historian delves into the battle that shaped the Roman Empire

In his new book, “The War That Made the Roman Empire: Antony, Cleopatra, and Octavian at Actium,” historian Barry Strauss offers a more accurate, nuanced narrative of the conflict and the fascinating personalities at its core.
Orange pill bottle, spilling green pills

Article

Electrosynthesis energizes sustainable drug development

A Cornell-led collaboration used electrochemistry to stitch together simple carbon molecules and form complex compounds, eliminating the need for precious metals or other catalysts to promote the chemical reaction.
Person looks carefully at physics lab equipment

Article

Gender bias in lab groups not rooted in personal preference

The finding shows there is potential for instructional interventions that could correct the gender inequity in physics labs.
Book cover: The Queerness of Home

Article

Historian delves into LGBTQ life and the American home

The intimacy of domestic space was a crucial aspect of LGBTQ life in the postwar era, according to historian Stephen Vider, who explores that history in his new book.
Book cover: The Economic Weapon

Article

Economic sanctions evolved into tool of modern war

Economic sanctions have long been considered a nonviolent deterrent, but ironically they have become a tool of modern warfare, according to a new book by Nicholas Mulder, assistant professor of history.
Field of semiconductors

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Semiconductor demonstrates elusive quantum physics model

With a little twist and the turn of a voltage knob, Cornell researchers have shown that a single material system can toggle between two of the wildest states in condensed matter physics.
Two squares: one green and pink graph, the other rainbow

Article

3D semiconductor particles offer 2D properties

Cornell researchers have found that 3D semiconductor particles have 2D properties, which can be leveraged for photoelectrochemical processes that boost solar energy conversion technologies.
Campus buildings, cloudy sky, lake

Article

Three Cornellians named Schwarzman Scholars

Shaheer (Shawn) Haq ‘21, Daniel James II ’22 and Xiaochen (Brian) Ren ‘22 were elected to join the seventh cohort of Schwarzman Scholars, a program that nurtures a network of future global leaders.
 Voting sticker help up by a smiling person

Article

Modeling suggests friendships may lead to lopsided elections

Have you ever thought about not voting because your candidate’s victory seems assured? Think again.
 Roberto Sierra

Article

Sierra wins Latin Grammy for guitar sonata

Composer Roberto Sierra won for “Music from Cuba and Spain, Sierra: Sonata para Guitarra.”
Board game with black and white pieces

Article

Weak coupling shows flaw in strange metal model

Planckian metals have the potential to power high-temperature superconductors, quantum computers and a host of other next-generation technologies.
man looking at a piece of charcoal

Article

New timeline clarifies Indigenous history in Mohawk Valley

A collaboration between the Cornell Tree-Ring Laboratory and the New York State Museum in Albany has established a more precise timeline for some of the most iconic archeological sites in the Mohawk Valley.
book cover

Article

Book explores Nigerian women’s political activism

"The Great Upheaval: Women and Nation in Postwar Nigeria,” explores the years immediately following World War II, which were pivotal for women in Nigeria.
album cover

Article

Concerto highlights individual voice and the sound of community

“The Oberlin Concertos,” released Sept. 17, features a composition by Elizabeth Ogonek, which combines voice, piano and percussion.
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