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Book cover: Subdivision

Article

Lennon publishes doubleheader of new fantastical fiction

J. Robert Lennon, who teaches fiction in Cornell’s Creative Writing Program, published two new books on April 6: “Subdivision,” a fantastical novel about memory and trauma; and “Let me Think,” 71 short stories collected from years of observing and chronicling the American absurd in fiction.
Silhouette of person kneeling by a pond

Article

Religion follows patterns of politicization during COVID-19

The analysis confirmed a documented benefit of religion: increased mental health.
William J. Kennedy

Article

Kennedy recognized by Renaissance Society of America

The Renaissance Society of America has given William J. Kennedy its Paul Oskar Kristeller Lifetime Achievement Award, honoring “a lifetime of uncompromising devotion to the highest standard of scholarship accompanied by exceptional achievement in Renaissance studies.”
James Walsh

Article

Klarman fellow bridges divide between math and philosophy

Working in the field of logic, James Walsh, a Klarman Postdoctoral Fellow in philosophy, studies the axiomatic method, a central methodology in mathematics whereby claims are proven from axioms.
Person holding a baby close

Article

Faculty examine racism ‘embedded’ in US health care

During the “Racism in America: Health” webinar on March 29, four Cornell faculty members elaborated on ways the COVID-19 pandemic has exposed race-based discrepancies in health care and health outcomes under the American health care system.
Book cover: Feral Ornamentals

Article

‘Playful uncertainty’ apparent in new poetry by Charlie Green

In “Feral Ornamentals,” Literatures in English senior lecturer Charlie Green finds whimsy in uncertainty and humor in the “terrifying,” creating new poems with a fact-based look at the natural world and a sense of exploration through process.
Salah Hassan

Article

Hassan honored for elevating the study of global modern art

Salah Hassan, Distinguished Professor of Arts and Sciences in Africana Studies, has been elected as the 2021 Distinguished Scholar by the College Art Association for his scholarship and curatorial work, which have been deeply formative in bringing recognition to the study of modern and contemporary African and African diaspora art.
Samantha Trumbo

Article

Astronomy to host 51 Pegasi b Fellow Samantha Trumbo ’13

As a 51 Pegasi b Fellow hosted by the astronomy department, Samantha Trumbo ’13, a doctoral student in planetary science at the California Institute of Technology, will follow up on her breakthrough research on Europa and other of Jupiter's moons.
Yehonathan Indursky

Article

Director of Netflix hit “Shtisel” highlights Jewish Studies event

Yehonathan Indursky, director and writer of Netflix hit “Shtisel,” will talk about the series during an online event hosted by Cornell’s Jewish Studies Program on March 24.
Barbara Baird

Article

Baird honored among Distinguished Women in Chemistry, 2021

Barbara Baird, the Horace White Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biology in the College of Arts and Sciences, has been honored as one of the 2021 Distinguished Women in Chemistry or Chemical Engineering by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry.
cell tissue magnified in bright red and blue
Tissue slice of mouse melanoma, with all cells labeled in blue and cancer cells labeled in red by immunofluorescence

Article

Baskin lab identifies pathway for treating deadly melanomas

Baskin said he is excited about this potential pathway for treating melanoma, which is dangerous because of its ability to spread from skin to other tissues.
Three students in the back of a classroom

Article

Latinos, Blacks less swayed by college-bound friends

In new research, Steven Alvarado reports that having college-bound friends increases the likelihood that a student will enroll in college. However, the effect of having college-bound friends is diminished for Black and Latino students compared with white and Asian students, especially for males and especially for selective and highly selective colleges, due to structural and cultural processes.
Charles Petersen

Article

Klarman postdoc conducting ‘radical critique’ of meritocracy

Charles Petersen, Klarman Postdoctoral Fellow in history, studies 20th-century American history to better understand the rise of social and economic inequality in recent decades.
Person holds up images of a brain on film

Article

Neuroimaging reveals how ideology affects race perception

The study appears in a special issue about political neuroscience.
Red wires on a black background

Article

Tech Policy Lab launches with focus on AI

The lab examines how politics shapes the deployment of new technology that affects the lives of millions.
Photo of Lou Reed and Andy Warhol
John Munson/Cornell University A photo of Hall of Fame musician Lou Reed and artist Andy Warhol, in Cornell Library's Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections

Article

Fellowship will fund study of Warhol’s impact on ’70s music

Music Professor Judith Peraino won the 12-month fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities.
Modern building lit up at dusk, seen from above

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Arts and Sciences welcomes eight new Klarman Fellows

The incoming cohort of fellows will explore subjects ranging from the evolution of primate lifespans to urban public art in China to the effects of uncertainty and debt on financial decision-making.
Humanities Pod logo

Article

New ‘Humanities Pod’ a virtual space for ideas

A podcast launched this semester by the Society for the Humanities in the College of Arts and Sciences, provides a space for humanities scholars to share ideas virtually, keeping cross-disciplinary dialogue going even during pandemic conditions and extending the reach of these conversations beyond Cornell.
Antique line drawing of person in a tree, pursued by a dog

Article

NEH grants Cornell $750K to develop ‘Freedom’ database

Ed Baptist, professor of history in the College of Arts and Sciences, has received a $750,000 digital infrastructure grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to support the development of the Freedom on the Move (FOTM) database. Launched in 2014, the database collects and compiles fugitive slave advertisements from 18th- and 19th-century U.S. newspapers.
Kate Manne

Article

Manne to give Society for the Humanities talk on male entitlement

Kate Manne, associate professor of philosophy, will give a talk titled “He Said, She Listened: Mansplaining, Gaslighting, and Epistemic Entitlement.”
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