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 Journals on shelves in front of a window

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Center’s grants seed diverse research in the social sciences

How do perceptions of luck shape views about inequality and redistribution? Could interventions nudge hiring managers to evaluate job candidates blindly, and thus more objectively? Has remote instruction during the pandemic improved student interactions and equity in science labs?

 Person in a long hallway

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Cornell team seeks mercy for Lisa Montgomery

A team of Cornell faculty, graduate students and undergraduates is fighting to save Lisa Montgomery from federal execution next month, supporting her bid for clemency from courtrooms to recording studios to a social media campaign urging followers to #SaveLisa and consider #HerWholeTruth.

 candle and flame

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Micky Falkson, senior lecturer in economics, dies at 83

Micky Falkson, a senior lecturer in the Department of Economics and one of its longest-serving faculty members, died at home in Ithaca Nov. 7. He was 83.

 Mail in ballot envelop and face masks

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Student poll found voters anxious about election

Of respondents, 53.5% said they felt fearful about America's future.
 plastic viles being filled with vaccine in a machine

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Efficacy, politics influence public trust in COVID-19 vaccine

If an initial COVID-19 vaccine is about as effective as a flu shot, uptake by the American public may fall far short of the 70% level needed to achieve herd immunity, new Cornell research suggests.

 candle and flame

Article

Michael Morley, emeritus professor of math, dies at 90

Michael D. Morley, professor emeritus of mathematics in the College of Arts and Sciences (A&S), died Oct. 11 at Guthrie Robert Packer Hospital in Sayre, Pennsylvania. He was 90.

 Screen shot showing ten people

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Site empowering student voters wins ‘Pitch for the People’

In the 2016 presidential election, stronger turnout among college students could have flipped the outcomes in several states that were decided by razor-thin margins.

 Red dots on a dark map

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Experts: Acknowledge uncertainty in COVID communication

The researchers examined how politicians’ rhetoric and media framing affected support for using COVID-19 models to guide policies.
 Screen shot showing six people

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Policing, incarceration examined in racism webinar debut

The Racism in America series will resume in November with a focus on residential and educational segregation.
test image

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Policing, incarceration examined in racism webinar debut

When armed white militia members stormed Michigan’s state capitol in May, they were treated as peaceful protestors of a coronavirus stay-at-home order. Yet reports of excessive violence against Black Americans – including the police killings of George Floyd in Minneapolis and Breonna Taylor in Louisville – have become almost routine.
A frog

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Lost frogs rediscovered with environmental DNA

Scientists have detected signs of a frog listed extinct and not seen since 1968, using an innovative technique to locate declining and missing species in two regions of Brazil.
 Two people setting up a tent

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Peer pressure: Students promote culture of responsibility

From her COVID-19 supply tent in front of the Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts in Collegetown on a recent morning, Bianca Santos-Declet ’23 invited passersby to grab a free face mask, bottle of hand sanitizer or touchless stylus tool.

 Infographic: concentric circles with a blue box in the center

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World Economic Forum features history professor’s analysis

Governments and businesses should strive to limit the use of economic sanctions, which have increased dramatically since the 1970s, advises Nicholas Mulder, assistant professor of history in the College of Arts and Sciences.

 Book cover: The Myth of the Imperial Presidency

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Book casts doubt on notion of ‘imperial presidency’

Even Trump has backpedaled from numerous policies in the face of public backlash, the authors say.
 Two people in a screen shot

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Panel: Pandemic has exposed long-standing health inequities

Scholars discussed the deep roots of health inequalities in the U.S. during a webinar, “Systemic Racism and Health Equity,” moderated by Jamila Michener, associate professor of government.
 Person holding a sign

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Roper Center collection remembers, amplifies Black voices

In 1946, the Minneapolis Tribune’s Minnesota Poll billed itself as “an impartial, scientific weekly survey of what Minnesotans think on leading topics of the day.”

 A student sits on a grassy hill near a tree turned orange by autumn

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After fall decision, focus shifts to implementation

The decision to reactivate Cornell’s Ithaca campus for residential instruction this fall was a difficult one. Now comes the even harder work of making it happen.

 One student walks through a campus plaza

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Cornell plans to reactivate Ithaca campus for fall semester

Fall classes will start Sept. 2 and most students will return home before Thanksgiving break.
 Person speaking on screen

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Panel: Protests ‘a defining moment’ in quest for racial justice

Weeks of protests across the nation, signs supporting Black Lives Matter in more conservative neighborhoods, and reforms enacted since George Floyd’s death in Minneapolis all signal “a defining moment” and an opportunity for systemic change, four black lawmakers said June 15 during a Cornell-sponsored forum.

 House, grass, sidewalk

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Place doesn’t beat race as predictor of incarceration

“There’s a systemic and a deep inequality in American society."
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