News

Advanced options
Displaying 101 - 120 of 308

Byline: Array

Two people face many security cameras

Article

EU lacks leverage in pushing privacy standards on Amazon, Microsoft

The European Union’s privacy watchdog, the European Data Protection Supervisor has opened two investigations into EU institutions’ use of cloud computing services offered by Amazon and Microsoft. Sarah Kreps, professor of government, says the EU is in a difficult position when it comes to privacy and cloud storage.
Charlotte Logan

Article

Student Spotlight: Charlotte Logan

Charlotte Logan is a doctoral student in linguistics from Syracuse, New York. She chose to pursue further study at Cornell due to its location in the Haudenosaunee homelands and the American Indian and Indigenous Studies Program.
Stella Ocker

Article

Student Spotlight: Stella Ocker

Stella Ocker, a doctoral candidate in astronomy and space sciences, chose to pursue further study at Cornell due to the intellectually rigorous research and supportive environment.
flowering trees frame a glass building

Article

Cornell poet, scholar receive 2021-2022 Rome Prize

Valzhyna Mort, assistant professor of literatures in English, received the Rome Prize in Literature for 2021-2022. Mary Jane Dempsey, graduate student in the Department of Romance Studies, received the Rome Prize in Modern Italian Studies.
 outline of two slaves carrying bundles

Article

NEA grants $30,000 to music dept. for ‘Freedom on the Move: Songs in Flight’

The National Endowment for the Arts has approved a $30,000 Grants for Arts Projects award to the Department of Music to support a musical response to Freedom on the Move (FOTM), a database housing digitized, searchable fugitive slave advertisements.
Wire up close; mosque in background
Old City Jerusalem

Article

De-escalation up to Israelis and Palestinians, but U.S. can help

Deadly clashes between Israelis and Palestinians are likely to continue this week, as the Israeli military deploys additional forces near the Gaza Strip. Uriel Abulof, a visiting professor in Cornell University’s government department and professor at Tel-Aviv University, gives perspective.
people in business clothes check smart phones

Article

‘Who is guarding Facebook’s guardians?’ Lawmakers can step up oversight

Facebook’s Oversight Board voted to uphold the social media company’s suspension of former President Donald Trump on its platforms but insisted the company must review the suspension to determine an appropriate length of time and develop clearer policies to balance freedom of expression and public safety. Professor of government Sarah Kreps says that Facebook’s Oversight Board acts like a private firm without real accountability of its own and that its consequential decision making over Facebook’s policies require additional independent oversight.
Three children walk away down a path between tents

Article

Despite refugee boost and family reunification, Biden has ‘long road to go’

On Monday, the Biden administration announced a significant increase in the number of refugees allowed to enter the United States. The announcement comes as the administration also begins to reunite parents separated from their children under the Trump administration’s family separation policy. Maria Cristina Garcia, professor of history and Latino studies, and Chiara Galli, sociologist and Klarman Postdoctoral Fellow, comment.
City avenue leading toward US Capital building

Article

DC statehood represents ‘equal rights of citizenship,’ not politics

On Thursday, the U.S. House of Representatives passed H.R. 51, a bill that would make the District of Columbia the 51st state. David Bateman, professor of government says that while much of the critique of H.R. 51 is political, the bill represents a decision about whether residents of DC merit equal rights of citizenship.
Curviture of the earth, seen from a great height

Article

Research and restore: How Cornell scientists are conserving Earth’s resources

Cornell researchers are working to restore our planet’s natural resources — from the soil to the seas to the skies — and helping to ensure a sustainable future for years to come.
person in polic uniform, walking through shadowy space

Article

Chauvin verdict first step in police reform, finding alternatives to policing

On Tuesday, Derek Chauvin was convicted by a jury of killing George Floyd in an act of police violence on May 25, 2020. Joe Margulies, professor of law and government, says the verdict in Chauvin’s case underscores that police should only respond to calls requiring an armed officer.  
Colorful mural of the word "VOTE"
Jennifer Griffin/Unsplash Chicago artist Mac Blackout's mural encouraging Americans to get out and vote.

Article

Business-GOP alliance fraying as CEOs oppose voting limits

On Wednesday, hundreds of companies’ executives joined in a new statement to call out Republican-sponsored voting bills that they say will curtail voting access in several American states. History professor Lawrence Glickman, an expert on consumer activism, comments
Person receiving a post-vaccine bandage from a medical worker

Article

J&J vaccine pause a sign of ‘super cautious’ health agencies

Federal health agencies have recommended pausing the use of Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 vaccine after six people developed blood clots within two weeks of receiving the one-shot vaccine. Government professors Sarah Kreps and Doug Kriner, who have surveyed nearly 2,000 American adults on issues regarding their willingness to get a vaccine, comment.
Jake Turner

Article

Cornell Postdoc Jake Turner receives prestigious NASA Hubble Fellowship

“These outstanding young scientists are the future of astrophysics, and their impact on our understanding of the cosmos will be felt for decades to come."
Construction equipment on a work site

Article

Expert discusses Biden’s sweeping infrastructure package

The Biden administration is making a pitch this week for new legislation that could provide a combined $3 trillion for infrastructure such as roads, rail lines, electric vehicle charging stations and grid upgrades, while investing in universal pre-kindergarten, paid family leave and free community college. Noliwe Rooks, the W.E.B. Du Bois Professor in Africana studies and an expert on the role of segregation in American society, comments.
Evanston, Illinois
Image by Madcoverboy; Creative Commons license 3.0 Evanston, Illinois

Article

'Not a local affair': Evanston reparations could harm national movement

On Monday night the city of Evanston, Illinois approved the nation’s first government-run reparations program that would make funds available to Black families for homeownership and mortgage assistance. Olúfémi Táíwò, professor of Africana studies, and Noliwe Rooks, the W.E.B. Du Bois Professor in Africana studies and director of the American Studies Program, comment.
White and blue Israeli flag in front of stone buildings

Article

Netanyahu enters election in high spirits, despite prospect of deadlock

On Tuesday, Israelis will vote in their fourth parliamentary election in two years. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s party is engaged in a tight race that some commentators say will end up rewarding Netanyahu’s management of vaccine distribution in recent months. Uriel Abulof, visiting associate professor of government, comments.
Tianyao Qu

Article

Student Spotlight: Tianyao Qu

Tianyao Qu is a doctoral student in sociology from China.
Highway with lights snakes between mountain and bay

Article

US-China summit: ‘It's so cold in Alaska’

Top officials from the U.S. and China will meet in Anchorage on Thursday and Friday for the first high level summit after President Biden took office. Cornell College of Arts and Sciences faculty experts Allen Carlson discusses the political and economic implications of the summit.
Candle and flame, dark background

Article

Ignoring anti-Asian crimes furthers white supremacist violence

Eight people were shot and killed Tuesday night at Atlanta-area massage parlors, six of whom were of Asian descent. Christine Bacareza Balance, director of the Asian American Studies Program and professor of performing & media arts at Cornell University, says such violent acts are a part of the white supremacist systemic violence against Black, indigenous, and all other communities of color.
Top